Ron Edmondson

  • 10 Bible Truths about Freedom

    Blessed is the nation whose God is the Lord... Psalm 33:12

    If my people who are called by my name humble themselves, and pray and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven and will forgive their sin and heal their land. 2 Chronicles 7:14

    And work for the peace and prosperity of the city where I sent you into exile. Pray to the LORD for it, for its welfare will determine your welfare.” Jeremiah 29:7

    Trust in the Lord with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding; in all your ways submit to him, and he will make your paths straight. Proverbs 3:5–6

    I will walk about in freedom, for I have sought out your precepts. Psalm 119:45

    Then you will know the truth, and the truth will set you free. John 8:32

    Now the Lord is the Spirit, and where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is freedom. 2 Corinthians 3:17

    For freedom Christ has set us free; stand firm therefore, and do not submit again to a yoke of slavery. Galatians 5:1

    Live as people who are free, not using your freedom as a cover-up for evil, but living as servants of God. 1 Peter 2:16

    But our citizenship is in heaven, and from it we await a Savior, the Lord Jesus Christ, who will transform our lowly body to be like his glorious body, by the power that enables him even to subject all things to himself. Philippians 3:20–21


    Ron Edmondson pastors Immanuel Baptist Church. Find out more at: http://www.ronedmondson.com/about

  • A Brilliant Setup to the Most Important Question Ever…

    While He was praying in private and His disciples were with Him, He asked them, “Who do the crowds say that I am? ” They answered, “John the Baptist; others, Elijah; still others, that one of the ancient prophets has come back.” “But you,” He asked them, “who do you say that I am? ” Peter answered, “God’s Messiah! ” (Luke 9:18-20)

    I am not sure Jesus cared what others were saying at this point. It was an introduction to a more important question. He was getting all the options on the table. I’m not even sure we heard all of the ones they listed.

    But the real issue was, “Who do YOU say I am?”

    In the end, as far as you should be concerned, that’s all that matters. Answering that question isn’t a group activity. It’s not a team consensus. It’s not subject to public opinion or popularity of the culture of the day.

    But it’s the most important question you’ll ever answer…

    Who do you say the “I AM” is?

    Who is Jesus to you?

  • 12 Game-Changing and Tweetable Proverbs

    A gentle answer deflects anger, but harsh words make tempers flare. – Proverbs 15:1

    A wise person is hungry for knowledge, while the fool feeds on trash. – Proverbs 15:14

    Plans go wrong for lack of advice; many advisers bring success. – Proverbs 15:22

    Greed brings grief to the whole family – Proverbs 15:27

    Pride goes before destruction – Proverbs 16:18

    Discretion is a life-giving fountain to those who possess it – Proverbs 16:22

    Kind words are like honey – Proverbs 16:24

    Better to be patient than powerful – Proverbs 16:32

    Love prospers when a fault is forgiven. – Proverbs 17:9

    A cheerful heart is good medicine. – Proverbs 17:22

    Spouting off before listening to the facts is both shameful and foolish. – Proverbs 18:13

    Enthusiasm without knowledge is no good; haste makes mistakes. – Proverbs 19:2

    Which of these most speak to you?

  • 5 Things I Learned in Church Planting

    I’ve planted two churches. In each plant, God overwhelmed us continually with what He did among us. I feel humbled and blessed to be a part of such healthy environments God uses to reach people with the Good News of Jesus Christ.

    I have learned a few things in the process. Some of these were new insights and some of were things I had confirmed, but all are things I would suggest other church planters consider.

    Here are 5 lessons I learned in church planting:

    Don’t shy away from leaders, even though they are churched — you’ll need them – When we started, if a person showed up who regularly attended another local church, we shied away from them. We weren’t rude to them, but we really didn’t pursue them as we did other visitors, simply out of respect of other churches. What I have learned, however, is that many times this was standing in the way of something God was doing in the person’s life. At the same time, we were suffering from a leadership void not having enough people ready to lead in a church setting. There’s a huge difference in recruiting and accepting churched people into a church plant.

    Don’t be afraid to talk about money — you’ll need it - I know this is a problem for many church planters, because a perception is that people church plants reach are repelled by money talks. Granted, some people wrongly feel that all churches talk about is money and so they push back any time money is mentioned. We can know and tell people that Jesus talked much about money (some say more than any other subject), but in an attempt to be attractive to unchurched people, church plants often avoid any money talk whatsoever. What I learned, however, is that it takes money to minister to people. Additionally, part of the spiritual growth process of a person is how they view and handle money and one of my roles is to help them mature in this area. I can’t do that unless we talk about it. And the pushback when we do, if handled with truth and grace, is far less than I expected it to be.

    Surround yourself with some encouragers—some days they’ll keep you going - The work of church planting by itself is tough and places a strain on the planter and his or her family, but church planting also has plenty of naysayers. The church world can be very competitive, and church planters are not always the most popular pastors among the established church world. And because things are new and in the discovery phase of building a church, not everyone will agree with every decision. (That’s in every church setting.) I’ve learned I needed enough people around me who believe in me and the vision of the plant so that on the days when I was down, they could encourage me to pick my head up and keep moving forward towards what God had called us to do.

    Know what to control and what to let go of—you’ll be stretched if you don’t - There are some things to hold on to very tightly, such as vision or senior leadership positions, but I learned to let go of things such as how the vision gets implemented or what color we use for rugs in the preschool area. (I never would have stressed about that last one—but you get the idea.) The more I allowed others to do and take leadership of, the greater success we had in reaching our overall vision.

    Embrace hurting people—as much as it hurts - We extended so much grace to people—and we were burned a few times. I have been personally hurt by people to whom I invested so much love and support, who quickly fell back into their old way of life. I know God rewards this sacrifice, but it still stings. The fact is, however, that some of the best leaders we developed over the years were hurting, broken people when they arrived. God still does miracles with people when we extend His grace and truth. (And those have to be extended on an equal basis.)

    I am not sure these are unique experiences to church plants—in fact, they are true now that I’m serving in church revitalization, but certainly church planting was where these paradigms were shaped in me. It was a learning process every day—as all leadership positions are, but my hope is that others will learn from our experience.

    Which of these do you most need reminding of today?


    Ron Edmondson pastors Immanuel Baptist Church. Find out more at: http://www.ronedmondson.com/about

  • About Ron Edmondson

    Ron Edmondson serves as the senior pastor of Immanuel Baptist Church in Lexington, Kentucky, and has an impressive history of church planting and church growth. A nationally known Christian leader, he was raised in a Christian home and active in his home church, First Baptist Church of Clarksville, Tennessee, serving as a lay leader, deacon, Sunday School director, and teacher. After twenty years in business, including time owning an insurance agency and a small manufacturing company, Ron heard God’s call to ministry.

    A lifelong student of the Bible, Ron’s strong theological background guides him to teach faithfully from Scripture. Ron identifies himself as a wisdom seeker and a teacher.

    Find out more at: http://www.ronedmondson.com/about