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Chapter VIII

SHOULD FROM THAT TIME FORM ONE OF THE GREAT MISSIONARY Schemes Of Our Church. In July 1841, a similar resolution was passed by the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in Ireland. So thus one grand result of this undertaking has been, that the venerable Church of Scotland, in days of darkness and perplexity, along with her revived and vigorous offspring in Ireland, has been led to acknowledge herself debtor Doth to the Jews and to the Greeks, and humbly to imitate the Apostolic Church of Jerusalem, by sending forth some of her sons to the heathen, and some to the circumcision.* True, when we turn our eyes on the millions of the blinded heathen, and the scattered bones of Israel that whiten the valley of vision, we feel that absolutely nothing has been done at all adequate to the awful need of a perishing world, and the weight of our responsibility. Yet a beginning has been made; the cry, "Come over and help us," is now distinctly heard in the remotest corners of our land. And all who take pleasure in tracing the steps of the Son of man, as he walks amidst his golden candlesticks, cannot but thank God that these two Churches have now come forth in their full Evangelistic character—preaching Christ and him crucified to their people at home, and stretching out their hands abroad, with the offer of the water of life to the distant Gentiles and the dispersed of Judah. "Not unto us, O Lord, not unto us, but unto thy name give glory, for thy mercy and for thy truth's sake."

• Gal. ii. 9.

rent reading of the principal prayers. (The system of mutual instruction.) 3d School—Catechetical instruction, moral and religious: a first or elementary class, and a second or superior class. 3d School—Reading and translating the prayers. The reading of the Pentateuch, and some chapters of the Prophets (mOfln,) with the tonic accents (O,Dp0.)

Italian rendering of Hebrew vocables. Rules for

the vowel points and tonic accents.

More Advanced Schools.

1st School—Complete and progressive reading of the Bible,
and the oral rendering of it into the vernacular language.
1st Class—The Pentateuch and first historical books.
2d Class—The other books of the Bible.

Rudiments of Hebrew Grammar. Religious duties

of the Jews. Hebrew text, read and translated, of Maimonides

•\vih iun, Part I, abridged. Hebrew text, read and translated, of Jarchi ('gn) on

the Pentateuch. Hebrew text, read and translated, along with the Chaldee paraphrase of Onkelos. 2d School—A course of Hebrew grammar. 3d School—Oral and written translation of the Bible.

Selections and moral illustrations of the some.

Talmudical work called " Everlasting Way*.TM) The ritual of Caro—rules regarding the prayer*

(voL I. p. 1.) Select treatises of the Mishna. (The Mishna of

rabbi Bartenora.'v

Literary School.

Higher Hebrew Grammar.

Translation of Themes from Italian into Hebrew.*
Complete course of Biblical Illustration—including grammati-
cal, moral, philological, and archaeological comments.

Rabbinical School.

Talmud—select treatises, with illustrations (such as nwu,
"Blessings before meat;" nar, "Sabbath;" en, "Fes-
rivals.")
Maimonidee—select illustrations (such as nniDK m'wKD, " for-
bidden meats/')
A complete course from the Rituary of Caro, with illustrations.

* As a specimen of the way in which they teach the scholar to write Hebrew, we subjoin the following. The master of the class took up a book that was lying by him, and read the following sentence in Italian. *• I counsel thee to read with the pen in your band, and to write on the book the useful and new ideas. This is the best means.of imprinting them in your minds; and farther, being in this way able always to find them, they will be help, ful to you in your conduct when they are good." A lad, in the coarse of a few minutes, thus rendered the passage into Hebrew, using the current Hebrew hand:—

mavnen iBDa aina1?) oara ovin np a'iBDa nyh Dan* fp» »« ranxao m naSm oaaaSa Qws awn ynn mn nt niinm roVpuj

APPENDIX. 523

The commentaries of the Mishna (such aa rurn w*n, "New

Year;" ro'D, " Feast of Tabernacles.")
Opinions of the rabbis on questions regarding ceremonies.

CIVIL INSTRUCTION.

Elementary Schools.

1st School—Formation of syllables and reading. Penman.

ship, Arithmetic, the four first rules and fractions. (The

system of mutual instruction.) 2d School—Instructive readings. 3d School—Drawing. Geometrical figures—principles of

ornament and architecture.

More Advanced Schools.

1st School—Penmanship and Orthography completed. Higher

arithmetic, applied to Commerce. Italian Grammar. 2d School—" Scrittura Doppia." System of weight*, measures, and coins. Mercantile Correspondence. 3d School—The French language.

4tb School—Elements of history, geography and cosmography. 5th School—Lessons and exercises in vocal music, as used in the sacred songs of the synagogue.

Institution Tor Fxmales.

I. Religious and Moral Instruction.

Formation of syllables, exercises on the vowel points, and reading of Hebrew.

Reading of the daily and common prayers, in Hebrew.

Oral translation of the same.

The Catechism.

Daily reading, in the assembled classes, of moral and religious books, with illustrations and applications.

II. Civil Instruction.

Formation of syllables, and reading of Italian. (The system

of mutual instruction.)
Instructive moral readings.
Penmanship.
Arithmetic

III. Instruction in the Common Domestic Arts.

1. Sewing, knitting, Slc.

3. Embroidery, and works of the needle.

524 APPENDIX.

No. II.

VALUE OF THE COINS MENTIONED IN THE COURSE OF THIS WORK.

A Piastre in Syria, = lid. =3 cents.

in Asia Minor, = 2d. = 4 cents.

in Moldavia, = 3d. =6 cents.

Harieh in Egypt and Syria, = 9 piastres, = 27 cents.

A Para, = 40th part of a piastre.

A Zwanzig, = 8d. =16 cents.

A Kreutzer, ^a of a Zwanzig, less than a half-penny.

A Polish Gulden, = 6d. = 12 cents.

A Preuss Gulden, = 2s. = 48 cents.

We may subjoin a specimen of the endless variety of Turkish coins which annoy and perplex the traveller. At Smyrna, the following note of the value of coins was given us along with our bag of money.

No. III.

BISTORT OF RABBI SIMEON BZN VOCIIaI.

We give the following as one out of a thousand specimens of Jewish credulity.—Rabbi Simeon is said to have lived in the second or third century. One day when some of them were met together, a rabbi named Pupas, who had visited Rome, related to his friends the wonders he had seen,—dwelling especially upon the works of public utility, such as the bridges, the baths, and the highways. Rabbi Simeon was much displeased at his commendsthat were ploughing in the fields within their sight. On this, God commanded them to return back to the cave, lest the whole world should be consumed by them; and there they remained other twelve years. During this period rabbi Simeon composed the Book of Zohar, still enjoying the instruction of the prophet Elijah. On leaving the cave the second time, the frowns of rabbi Eliezer were as destructive as rabbi Simoon's had been the first time, but the blessing of rabbi Simeon restored all that rabbi Eliezer laid waste. They hid the Zohar, in the cave, where it was found 400 years after, the roll being as fresh as if written only yesterday. Pilgrimages are performed to the rabbi's grave at Marona every year by Jews from all parts of the world. They remain at it three days, spending the time in mirth and festivity. Often hundreds of pounds worth of shawls, dipped in oil, are burned in his honour. Vows are made to him, and prayers presented for deliverance from any misfortune. Even in the time of the late earthquake, hundreds came to pour out their prayers over his grave.

No. IV.

JEWS OF CORFU.

Communicated by a Resident there. (Bee page 393.)

The number of Jews in the island of Corfu is about 2000. They all reside in a particular quarter of the town, but are not separated from tho rest of the population by any enclosed wall, as is the case at Rome, Ancona, and other places in Italy. They have two synagogues, and two small oratories There is some trifling difference in the ceremonies performed at the two synagogues, but not such as to prevent a Jew, who is in the habit of attending one of the synagogues, from frequenting and worshipping at the other. The Jews at Corfu I consider a very unfavourable specimen of their race. They ore, in general, filthy in the extreme in their in me extreme.

Twenty years ago, a Jew dared not venture to show his face in the street during Passion-week. Detachments of troops si that season of the year, were stationed at their synagogues to protect them from insult and violence; but a great change has taken place since then, and they may now walk about the streets even on Good Friday with impunity.

The chief rabbi is a native of Gibraltar, and calls himself an Englishman. His name is Bibas. He is a genuine Pharisee of the old school, rigidly observing the Jewish law. Some time since he prohibited his people from carrying an umbrella on the Sabbath, as a violation of the fourth commandment The Jews here are generally very strict in their observance of the Sabbath, which they will not violate for any temporal consideration, but they revolted against the prohibition to carry an umbrella on that day In reply to the inquiry whether there are any Christians at Corfu who care for the souls of the Jews, I can only say that the Christians here, whether Greeks, Roman Catholics, or Protestants, care little, generally speaking, for their own souls, and therefore have little thought for the souls of the Jews.

No. V,

JEWS OP DAMASCUS.

Communicated by Erasmus 8. Cai.ma*. from personal observations a few years ago

The Jews of Damascus ore, like their brethren at Bagdad, the descendants of the first and second captivity; their descent may, many suppose, be traced as far back as the reign of King David.

books and tracts, and are very communicative. The fact of the Jewish quarter being at a distance from that of the Christians, cuts off any kind of intercourse except that of business, and this deprives them of every opportunity of giving vent to their ill-humour, which they might otherwise have done, and likewise lessens their dislike to Christianity. The Pasha of Egypt, since he has taken possession of Syria, has wrested all the secular authority from the hands of the rabbis, which is another reason for the liberal opinions of the Jews at Damascus. I would thus conclude, that Damascus, as a missionary station, is of the utmost importance, not only as it regards the direct preaching to the Jews, but also as it concerns the distribution of the word of God. Caravans come and go regularly from Damascus to Bagdad, Mosul, Aleppo, and other large towns, several times in the year, where the Jews purchase every copy of the Scriptures they can obtain from the British and Foreign Bible Society's Agent, and send them to the above-mentioned places, from which again they are sent to Persia and Curdistan; and this is the only channel I am aware of, by which the word of God can reach the Jews in these distant regions. The Society's edition of the Bible is almost the only one which is used in their families and the schools.

Schools for Jewish children may likewise be easily established there, where the Hebrew, Arabic, and English should be taught. The latter language grows daily in importance since the trade with England increased. At Beyrout, where the number of Jewa is comparatively small, not amounting to more than 100 iudivi528 APPENDIX.

duals, several families of Jews send their children to the American school intended for the native Christians there, and parents make no objection to their being instructed in the New Testament.

It is interesting to read the above observations, written before the sad persecutions of these Jews had somewhat changed their feelings and situation. Perhaps, however, even after all they have suffered at the hands of persecutors, on the ground of an alleged murder of a Christian, British Christiana will be found as welcome to the Jews of Damascus as ever before. For British Chris. tians have come forward to plead their cause as well as British Jews. Among others, the General Assembly of our Church in 1840, unanimously agreed to memorialize Government to interpose in behalf of the persecuted Jews at Rhodes and Damascus.

No. VL

JEWS OF BAODAD.

Communicated by Erasmus S. Calmah, Woo personally visited them.

The Jews of Bagdad believe that they are descendants of the Jews who were carried thither in the first captivity. Tbey still have over them one called "Head of the captivity in Babylon," ^333 nV?j-tt'NT, an office which arose in the first or second century. About the same time arose the office of K3f K»pj e>K> " Head prince of the Holy Land." It is probable that these titles and offices arose from a desire to counteract the prophecy of Jacob, "The Sceptre shall not depart from Judah, nor a lawgiver from between his feet until Shiloh come." They still apply the first part of this passage to their "Head prince of the captivity," and the "Lawgiver" to the u Head prince of the Holy Land." The Romans abolished the latter office, so that the Jews now content themselves with referring to the first. They further say, that none were made princes who could not prove their descent from Judah. It is said that the Jews themselves applied to the Romans to put down the Head prince of the Holy Land, because of his oppressions. At present, the Prince of the Captivity is not a descendant of Judah, but is raised up by the Porte and the local Government at Bagdad to exact from his brethren the money levied on the Jewish nation there. The people bate the office, and wish it was abolished. Mr. Caiman, on a visit to him, once asked him "If he really thought himself the sceptre that was to remain in Judah 7" He gave no answer; he would not say that he believed it, but only smiled. Yet

year accompany me caravans mai go 10 Damascus ana Aleppo, in order to visit the graves of their favourite rabbis, such as the author of the Zohar, at Marona. The poorer classes, who have not the means of making pilgrimages to the Holy Land, go on pilgrimages to the innumerable graves of the writers of the Talmud, in the vicinity of ancient Babylon. Some go to the graves of the prophets Jeremiah and Ezckiel, who are supposed to be buried on the frontiers of Persia, making vows and prayers to them.

They are occupied in bartering and traffic, the commerce of Bagdad and its vicinity being entirely in their hands. They have occasionally stopped trade by withdrawing their capital from the market, when the Pasha attempted to make alterations in the currency injurious to their interests. Few have any manual trade, except writing out the Pentateuch on parchment scrolls, for which they are famous in all the East .

They are bitterly opposed to Christianity and to missionaries. The reasons of this are—If any Jew were to embrace Christianity, the Head of the Captivity has power to punish him; and he has done this occasionally in so severe a way that the criminal has died under the lash. Another reason is, that Christians—Armenians especially—avenge themselves on the poor Jews for wrongs done them by the Mahometans. The peculiar hatred which the Jews bear to the Armenians may arise from a charge often brought against them, namely, that Hainan was an Armenian, and that the Armenians are the Amalekites of the Bible. When Mr. Caiman visited Bagdad with Mr. Groves in 1832, to try to open a school among the Jews, the attempt completely failed, chiefly through the fear they have of the Prince of the Captivity.

The Cabbala is more a matter of study than the Talmud, both here and in the East generally. Poland, instead of Babylon, may be said to have become the seat of the Talmud. The reason as"ready to perish in the land of Assyria."* When Mr. Caiman visited their Hacham, he was dressed in a long, coarse shirt, with a rope about his loins. A small square chamber served him both as a study and a synagogue. He had a few manuscripts, which be would not part with for any price in the world. He was delighted when Mr. C. told him that he was as much opposed to the Talmud as himself; and then listened to bim when he showed in the Old Testament the declarations of the prophets regarding a suffering Saviour. The Hacham's main objection to Christianity was Isaiah lxv. 4, "a people that eat swine's flesh."t Mr. Caiman showed him that this was not a reference to Christians, for the people spoken of "sacrifice in gardens," &c. The Karaites seem to be preserved as living witnesses against the Talmud, in the very seat of its former dominion and its birthplace.

No. VII.

STRIKING SIMILARITY IN THE MAIN FEATURES OF JUDAISM AND TOrlRT, PROVING THAT THEY HAVE ONE AUTHOR.

The object of both the systems of Judaism and Popery, is to lead men to go about to establish their own righteousness, and thus prevail upon them to live, and die without submitting to the righteousness of God. In the system of Judaism, the working of Satan is seen in excluding Christ, and offering the sinner a substitute for him: in Popery, his work is seen in including Christ, yet still presenting a substitute for him. On the forehead of both is written— Mystery or Iniquity.

• 1st, xxvii. 13. t lsa. lxv.«.

It is not safe to give the people at large the plain text of Scripture. And the prayers must be read in Latin, not in the vernacular tongue.

6

There is great merit in giving alms, and in prayers, pilgrimages, and other good works.

There is a purgatory. The beat of men must be purged after death, instead of at once entering into heaven.

8

No man can be sure of salvation till the very hour of death. Therefore he must try to make his vague hope somewhat surer by every means which the priests and the Church choose to point out.

9

It is right to pay the priests for the Confessional, saying Mass, &c

10

Prayer for the dead is useful to free

the soul from purgatory. Therefore,

after you die, we will pray for you,

if you pay us for doing to.

11

Prayers to dead saints and to the Virgin Mary, are of great benefit in time of trouble.

The plain grammatical sense of Scripture is to be taught to few. And we must never use any but Hebrew prayers, however few may understand them.

6

"Alms deliver from death." There is merit to be stored up by prayers, pilgrimages, feasts and fasis. "Touch not, taste not, handle not." 7

The Jew after death, must undergo atrial of fire, and roll under the earth to the Valley of Jeboshaphat.

8 No Jew in this life can come to a settled hope of acceptance; wherefore, be must use every means that the rabbis choose to appoint to make his hope surer.

The rabbis require a present for giving you advice, praying for your dead friends, &.c.

10

"May God remember the soul of my honoured father A. B., wbo is gone to bis repose; for that I now solemnly vow charity for his sake. In reward of this may his soul be bound up in the bundle of life." This is a prayer at the Feast of Tabernacles.

11 Every Jew ought to pray over the graves of the saints, asking them to intercede with God for him. It ia right also to plead the merit and services of our rabbis, and our fathers Abraham, Isaac, and lacob

rUiHl Uiuuil m ill"' Dinr- in inuair, no

ii a heretic; but if be re&d much of the Father*, he is a good son of the Church.

16 Keep the Sabbaths after forenoon service is over, by being gay and merry, and going to the theatres, 3tc.

17

Christ will receive those who make themselves holy before theycome, that is, who recommend themselves to him by their works, and their fidelity to the Church.

18

It is lawful to put a baptized man, woman, or child, to death, if they renounce the true Church.

19

There is no salvation out of the

Church of Rome.

a heretic or infidel; but if he stud/ much of the Talmud, this ia meri. torioui.

16

Keep the Sabbaths, when not oeeu pied in synagogue worship, by eating and drinking more than usual that day, taking three meals, and by walking about in gaiety, and calling oa each other.

17

It is not with pardon that Messiah has to do. He is to reward his faithful people, who are pardoned already by their alms, fasts, and prayers.

18 It is right to persecu te. even to death, any Jew who becomes a Christian.

19

•• Heretics and Epicureans go down to hell and are Judged for ever."

Such is a specimen of the coincidence between the doctrines of Judaism and those of Popery, and the instances could easily be multiplied, proving to a demonstration that both systems proceed from the Father of lies, the great adversary of Christ, and of the souls of men. Of the great mass of the deluded people under both systems, it may truly be said, "God has sent them strong delusion that they should believe a lie," while their priests and rulers subject themselves to that sentence from the lips of Christ—u Wo unto you, Scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! for ye shut up the kingdom of heaven against men; for ye neither go in yourselves, neither suffer ye them that are entering to go in."

2 Kings.
Verse.
8,
H,
29,
21,
1",
20,

1 Chronicles.

IV,
17,

2 Chronicles.

1.

6,

9,

31,

10,

ia,

36,

6.

23,

Nehemiaii.
2,4,

15,

5,

15,

17,18,
30,

Esther.

6,
14,
Jos.
13,14,
20, 21,

4,
15,
IS,

6,
11,
27,

6,8,

Psalms.
3,

4,
12,

Psalmscontinued.

Verse. Pane.

27, 64,134, 308 1

28,
34,

2,

11,

12,

13,

15,

20,

11,

2,

7,

10,

2,13,

16,

W,

2,

7,

1,

12,

5,

3,4,

12,

13,

2,3,

6,7,

18,

5,

6,7,

10,

4,

5,

12,

Jeremiah.

8,

18,

31,

32,

Versa
15,
17,

1,

13-15,

12,

18,

7,
11.
17,
13,
16,

5,

6,
19,
14,

C,

6.
20,
21.
10,
22,
18,
21,
18,

6,
21,
22,
33,
11,

7.

3,

8,

7,
14,
18,

5.

6,7,

45,46,

7,
38,
35,
47,
49,
Lamentations.

6,
12,

1,
1.5.

194,481
191

197
129

Acm—continued.

Chip. Verse. P««e.

5, 264

7, 238,312

8, 229
43

2, 347

7, 44

39, 35

nii. 23, 500

30,31, 478

Romans.

T. 8, 162

1 CoKINTHIANS.

rii. 28, 419

iz. 10, 116

». 26, 189

2 Corinthians.
if. 6, 137

▼ 1-4, 62

Galatians.

ii. 9, 520

Ephesians.

Iii. 18,19, 337

vi 12, 488

CoLOSSIANS.

H. 1, 338
It 13,15,16, 338

2 Thessalonuns.

ii. 4, 23,38

2 TlMOTHT.

i. 18, 328,337

It. 13, 347

MS

INDEX

or
THE CHIEF PLACES AND SUBJECTS.

Page
Alexandria, Governor's garden 51

16
12,16

515, 516
337

ir.

495

130, 136

20

329

4-:

39

339

434

104. 313

61

90

quern 71

school - 91

Aranesh Sueidan • 114

Arbela, caves oC or Bethabel 286
Archipelago, islands of 39, 42

Arimathea - - 122

Aries - • - 14

Ascension, church and hill of 159

Allasio

Alpea

Altona, Jewa of

Akhisar, or Thyatira

Am-el-Fehm

Amsterdam, Jews of

Anata or Anathoth

Ancona, Jewa of

a Jewess of
Andros -
Anti-melos
An'ioch of Piaidia
Aphikumen (Passover cakes)
Arab customa •

dance and song

oven

Asenibba
Ashdod -
Asher, tribe of
Ashkelon
Ashkenazim Jews

Abarim. hill of • •

Abbeville - •

Abilene, pass of

town and valley of

Aboukir, Bay of
Abraham's Oak •

Absalom's Monument •

Pillar

Abu-Dis. or Bethpage •
Abugilbany
Abusat, flock of
Abydos and Sestoa
Acacia tree in Galatz •
Aceldama
Achzib, now Zeeb
Acre, Ptolemais bazaar

-convent -
-synagogue

Page
144
6
310
810
55
184
146
157
195
63
117
347
373
151
- 238,315
23a 311,315;
311
312
314
148,314
100

Jews in

Adar or Adair, village of

A ill amy" mm • • 346;

Adriatic Sea - 35, 38,

.rt'gean Sea - 391

jf.gospotamoa, river • 3481

Ahmoud - . 55

Ai . • - 203

Ain-Derwa • - 178
Ain-el-Tin - . 286
Ain-Muhil , village of - 305
Ain-Tcen - - 318
Ain-Yebnid - • 206
Ain-Zeitoun - • 274
Ajaloun, valley of - 201
AlahSher, or Philadelphia 337
Albenga • 16
Alexandria - • 46, 53 Jewa in 50

coast of
Asia Minor, state of
Assos
Assoum •

Athaiiasiua, church of
Athens, Jews in
Athlete, ruins of
Jewish nynagogues 49 - Atonement, day of

404. m

Austria, system of )
espionage in S
Austrian Poland
A vims, country of
Avignon

Baal-perazim

Baba Capo, or Lectum

Baden, Jews in •

Bagdad, Jews in

Balkan Hills

Balteen

Balut tree

Barbary village -

Barley, field of, on Zion

mode of sowing

harvest

- winnowing

Bashan, hills of
Bathan •
Bath, an Eastern
Baths, Hot, at Tiberias
Bavaria, Jews in
Bazaars, Eastern 97,214, 357
Beatitudes, Mount of 276, 297
Beaucaire - • 13
Beauvais - 6
Bedouins - 77, 78,303
Bedouin Chief - - 71 mode of salutation 110, 113

Saiga
Bet-afta
Bet-car
Bet-daras
Beteen
Bet-emireen
Bet-nagar
Bet-hanina
Bethany
Bethaven
Bethcar
Bethel -
Bethesda, pool of
Beth-haccerem
Beth-hanoon
Beth-boor
Beth-horon
Bethlehem, view of

well

convent

114
110

114
'204
223
178
200
158,194,196,197
204
114

- 204,206
162

- 150, 135
106
2O0
201

- 175,185
185

— church of Helena

— cave

- Tekoali

- tents

112

60

268

203,204

83

Beds, Eastern

Bedundah

Beer, or Beeroth

Beer-el-abd

Beer-el-Defha - - 210

Beer-el-Luban - • 208

Beggars - - 449, 470

Bejepee, village ot - 467

Belus, river, or Schor Libnah 311

Benjamin, tribe of - 203

Bennishail village - 98

Bergamo, or Bergamoa 336

Berlin - - • 502

Jews in - 502

. state of religion in 504, 510

new school synagogue 505

churches - 506—7

- Sabbath desecration

Bethpeor, Mount

Bethpage

Bethsaida - *

Bet-Iba

Bet-Iksa, or Sechu

Betima -

Bet-Immer

Bet-Jalah, ancient Zelah

lit
-213
201

- Jewish school -

- university

- normal seminary

• missionary institution

507
509
510
511

2i1
181
3i"-8

Bet-Jan

Bet-Jibrim

Bet-Ouzin, a village

Bet-unia

Beyrout - 239,251,319

Sabbath schools 239

Jews in - - 242, 527

Roman remains 242

Beyukdere - -353,355

Bezetha - - 136

Birket-el-Gish - - 271

Birlat 401

Jews in - 402

Black Sea - - 366

Blanco, Cape - - 261,316

Bochnia - - 470

Boitzemburg - - 511

Bosphorus, the - 353

Bossanze, quarantine station 424
Botouchany - - 420

I Jews in - 420

Bouja, in Smyrna - 327, 329

[Boulogne - 3 interview with a Jew 4

Dabourieh. village of
Dacia, country of

language of

Dactyle -

Dair

Dalee

Damascus, Jews of

importance of, as a

missionary station
Damietta
Damour

Damoun, village of
Dan, tribe of
Danube, the River
Dardanelles or the }

Hellespont )

Dead Sea
Deeb Wady
Deer Emat
Deir-esnait
Deir-Eyub
Deir-maheysen •
Delos

Denmark, Jews in
Derbe
Dervishes, the Dancing

the Howling

Desert, the

preparation for jour- /

ney through the )

Dhura - - -

Dia
Dijon ...

Jews in

•— interview with two Jews

Dimreh •

Dinner, customs at Eastern

Dipsis

Dogs, Eastern -

Dor

Dover

Doves, Valley of

Doulis -

Drawing water, mode of

Dromedary, the

Druses -

Duadahr

- Ill

Eastern
cuatoms

profligacy of 23

Folds for flocks - 109,112

Foxshany, town of - 398

Jews in - 399

day of repentance 399

France ... 3—16

efforts necessary for
Jews in
Frank Mountain "'*'
Frankfort on the Oder
Fraustadt
Gaash • «*'-<

150
502
494

Gaba or Gibbethon
Gabatieh, village of
Gadarenes, country of
Galatz -

223

225

292

369—374

373

371,374

Galilee, Lake of 274, 275,293, 2941

mission to - 284

villages of - 148

Galley-slaves - 16,24,464

Gallipoli - - 348

Gateway, seat of judgment 91

- gipsies
- Jews in

• remarkable

Gaza, road to

— environb of

country -

Gazelles

Gceb

Gennesaretb, plain of

Genoa, bay and town of

Jews in

Popery

Gerar, valley of

Gerizim

Gertsman, village of

Gethsemane

Gibeah - »

Gibeon or El-Gceb

Gibbethon

Gibraltar, Jews in

a good missionary }

270,280

96, 100

101

102,104

296

206

276,286

16,20

18

20

91

21(1

433

142, 161, 194

200

201, 202

224

19, 243

Greek Church, su- ) .w, ~>, oq,
perstition in $ *M' *** ***
Grudak, village of - 467

Grunberg - - 502

Gulonitsky, village of • 441

Habad, a sect of Chasidim 412
Hadad-rimmon - 226

Hartsmi, Polish - 434,459

Hamburg, appearance of 512

population of 512

its character 512

af a missionary field 516

Jews in
synagogue

Hiemus, range of
Hamah

Hamath in Galilee
Handmills
Hasur -
Hatta

Hebrew language, advan- f
tage of grammatical >

174, 175
178

178,184
180

181
181
182
182

148, 184,246, 247
183
184

knowledge of
Hebron, road to

valley of •

town of

mosque of

Joseph's tomb

Wady Nazarah

pool of

tomb of Othniel

Jews in

synagogue

Abraham's Oak

Hellespont or Dardanelles 347
Hermon, Mount, or Jebel > ~,Q

Sheikh S

Hermon, Little - 276

Hermon beyond Jordan 289, 296
Hermopolis 40

Hierapolis - • 388

Hieres, Isle of - - 16

Ilinnom, valley of • 133, 151

Hith, Jews of - - 530

Holland, Jews in - 495

Holy Land. See Palestine.

station >

Gihon, valley and ) 133,i .,150

pools )

Gilboa 276

Gimzo - - - 117

Ginoaa - - 225

Gischala or Gish - 271

plain of - 272

Gleiwitz - - 482

Glogau - - - 498 . 500

Jews in - 498

Goats ... 82

Gob 206

Gomatter 78

Gorgona - • 32.

Gottenburg, Jews in - 515

Gozo - - - 34 i

Grasshoppers - • 113

Greece, coast of - 38,39
. prospects of mission- ) «>o

anesui

Greek Priests of Moldavia 372
Greek Priests of Wallachia 387

lbraila -
town

ornamental cross

——— river Seret

Jews in -

Icarian Sea *
Iconium-Konieh
Ida wells
Igzim, village of
Imbros -
Inkhorn, writer's
Isbirta - •

Ionia, shores of
Iscanderoon
Ismerieh
Ismid, Jews in -
Issacnar, tribe of
Ister-river _ •
Italy, coast of -

priesthood of

Jews in

efforts

ry for

Jacob's well
Jafla, Jews in
Jaglinsky, village church

— Jews

Janesherry, or Sigeum

Jaroslaw

Jassy

Day of Atonement

Jews in

schools

synagogues

Jebel Gaba Hill
Jehoshaphat, valley ) 141,

of S

Jenin, Gincsa -
Jenysus, now Khanounes
Jephthah-el, valley of -
Jeremiah's cave
Jerusalem, approach to

feelings on seeing

—— town of -

Olives Mount

Jews in 148, 130,

synagogues in -

Hebrew church -

Tomb of David •

barley field

——— valley of Hinnom

valley of Gihon -

Mount Zion

- extent of

Jerusalem, Sabbath in 137, 185

climate - - 138

sepulchre - 129

Calvary, moumere 141

Mount of Olives 141

Gethsemane - 143

Absalom's monument 146

paupers in - 148

valley of Gihon 150

Aceldama - 151

Casde of David 190

Temple wall - 191

Jeltar, village of - 267
Jews. See under various towns.
Jewish Burying-gTOund—'

at Alexandria - 52

at Brody - - 455

at Gulonitsky • 441

at Jerusalem - 156

at Khanounes - 98

at Leghorn - 28
at Tamapol - 441, 447

Jewish Ceremonies - 379

Day of Atonement 405

Circumcision - 59

Funeral - - 465
Last day of the feast, 436, 443

Marriage - - 416

New Year's Day - 388
Procession of the Law 438,442

Day of Repentance 399

Jewish Infirmary - 454
Jewish Reading-Rooms—

at Hebron - - 183

at Jerusalem - 193

at Saphet - - 273

Jewish Sabbath - 278

Jewish Synagogues. See under

various towns.
Jewish Schools—

none at Jerusalem 131

at Leghorn - 26

at Smyrna - 332

at Berlin - - 507

at Constantinople - 36O

at Cracow - - 4, i

at Jassy - - 413

missionary school at } ^g^

Posen )

at Schlichtingsheim 496

at Storchnest - 493
Jezreel, plain of - 225.298

village, now Zerin 303

Jibbah, village of - 268

town of 3O3

Jimso - 1"

550

INDEX.

Malta, Popery in - 36

Jews in - • 36

Mamre, plain of - 179

Manassch, half tribe of 224

Mareotic Lake - - x 54

Mareshah - • 115
Marmora, Sea of, or Propontis 348

Marona - - 280,281

Marriage, an Eastern - 56

Jewish, at Jossy 416

at Jaglinsky - 434

Marseilles, town of • 15

Jews in - 15

MarshukHill - - 317

Maruba, Wady - - 116

Matalish - • 223

Matapan, Cape Tasnarus 38

Maturieh - - 71

Mediterranean shore • 316

Hymn on 316

Meles, river - . 340
Molus ... 39
Menaghec, village of - 76
Menzaleh, Lake, or Mendes 70
Merj-lbrama - • 224
Mesmieh, village of - 115
Mestrael wind - • 14
Mezra 315
Mezra in Syria - - 206
Mezuzah, description of 456
Michmash - - 200
Misdul -.. 80
Miidel, village of - 287—288
Milan, Jews in - - 19
Millstone - - 110
Mirage, the - - 54
Misrach ... 469
Mizpch ... 144
Moab, hills of - - 182, 195
Modena, Jews in - 19
Modin -.. 122
Moes ... 7i
Moldavia, religion of - 371 its importance as a ) 243

scene of a Jewish mission J 424

number of Jews in 424

Montefiorc, Sir Moses - 142

Montlimart - - 13

Montreuil - - 6

Moriah, Mount - - 144, 145

Moschiska, village of • 467

Jews in - 467

Mourners, wailing of, in ) ,„„ ...

Jerusalem $ "* lu

Muezzin, the • 59,86

Music, no instrument} ,,. ...

of, in Palestine $ 118. 418

Mustard-tree - • 138

Mycone - 42

Mytilin. See Lesbos • 346

Nabka, the plant - 109

Nablous, Jews in - 148

valley of - 218

Naby-Samuel, or Roman 143, 199

Naby-Younes - - 253

Nabbok-tree 94

Nacoush, Jews in - 404

Nain. village of - 300, 303

Nakoura - - 219,315

Naphtali, tribe of - 268

mountains of 271, 280
prophecy regarding 285

Narkoping, Jews m
Naxos -
Nozarah, wady of
Nazareth, vale of

town of

bazaar

convent

Nebo, Mount

Nehemiah's well

Nephtoah, fountain of

Nets

Neusaltz

Nezib

Nice, Jews in

Nile, fulfilment of prophecy

reeds of -

Canopic branch

waters of -

banks of

Bolbotine branch

Mendesian do.

Pelusiac do.

Phatnitic or Bucolic do.

Sebennetic do.

Tanitic or Saitic da

Obeleshti, viflace of
Odv'ssus, now Varna
Offence, Mount of
Ohlau -
Olearos -
Olives, grove of
Mount of

Olive-press
Omar, Mosque of
Omeglia
Ophel -

482 Polish superstition

352 Polycarp's ijravc

353 Popery in Boulogne

354 in Brcslau
85 in Brody

114 in Civita Vccchia

90 in Cracow

in Genoa
19 in Jaglmsky

in Leghorn
in Malta
in Paris
in Poland
in Posen
in Kosetta
in Syra
in Smyrna
in Tarnapol
similarity with )
Judaism J
Porcupine or kaugfud
Post cart, Wallachian .
Poscn as a missionary )
station J

Jews in

schools

Potkamin, village of

Jews in -

130
321
321, 322

Potchoritz
Prausnitz

Jews in

Precipitation, Mount of
Premyslau

Jews in -

Propontis

Protestants in Boulogne
in Chalons
in Cracow
in Dijon
in Leghorn
in Lyons
in Marseilles
in Paris
in Posen
Provence

Prussia, Sabbath schools )
not allowed in \

nor prayer meetings 510

Prussian Schnell-post - 481

—School - 484

Teachers, mode of}

licensing

Oppeln -
Oriakoy, schools in

Jews in

village of

Ostracine
Oudsir • •

Oven, an Arab •

Padua, Jews in • •

Palestine—
Dillicultiea in the conver-
sion of Jews in
State of Jews in
Importance of, as a

missionary ticld
Means for sending gospel to 246
Population, different ac-) ,.g

counts of i

Number and condi-) 148, 164
tion of Jews in > 173

Missionaries to 193, 248, 321
qualifications of 193
Means of support in, for I
Jews J

Palm-tree

• few in Palestine

Palmosa or Patmos
Palus Condovia
Pamphylia, coast of
Paris, road to -

api,earance of

Jews in

Sabbath in

Parma, Jews in

Paros

Paths, places of •

Patmos, now Palmosa

Pavia, Jews in -

Pergamos, now Bergam

Jews in

Perleberg
Petra

Philadelphia
Plnlistia

Philistines, coast of
Piedmont, Jews in
Pilsno

Pisa, Jews in
Pisgah -
Pilesti, Jews in -
Pleschen, Jews in
Plough, Eastern
Podgorze .
Poland, Austrian

Prussian, as field of

missionary labour

471

127

I'J'.I

villages, charoc-1

terof
Pnith, tho
SOOlPloltiiiais.

See Acre.

IS",
432

Quarantine at Carmcl •
. at Galatz

'at Bossanze

Quern or handmill

Rachel's Sepulchre
Ram • •

Ramah -

Raman of the south
Ramallah • •

Ramath-lehi . •

Ramea - •

Manila •

Ramuuni, perhaps Hadad )

r»: I

Rimmon
Rnpha -

Raphat, ancient Raphia
Raa-el-ain
Raujeeb
Rawitz -
Reineh, village of
Rhaeteum
Reading places, or}

Yishvioth )

Reeds, disappearance of)

in Egypt J

Repentance, day of
Rephaim, plain of
Rhinocolura
Rhone, scenery on

Island at mouth

Rhodes

Jaws in

230

369

424

71

175
200

143, 199

99

200

103

218,269
124

226

96

203
317
209

48fi
307
317

168,193

32

399

135, 150, 174

86

Rice Mill
Rissa, El Arish
Rimnik, village
River of Egypt
Rome, Jews in
Ropsitza, village of

Jews in

Rosetta -

journey to

—— convent
—— rice-mill
—— bazaar

Jews in

Ruesh, village of
Russia, Jews in

Sabbath—

in Bucharest • 385

atCarmel - 230,233

in Constantinople - 364

in Cracow - - 472

in the Desert - 78

French - - 6,7

in Galatz - - 371

in Hamburg - 516

in Jaglinaky - 434

in Jerusalem - 137,188
sacrament 188

in Leghorn • 23

in Palestine - 94

in Paris - 7

in Posen • • 488

in Saphet - - 282

at Sea - 34, 44,346

in Smyrna - - 328

near Soutchava • 424

in Zopka • • 461

Saccas, village of - 272, 274

Safleen - - 115

Salmone, now Sidro

Saloniki. See Thessalonica

Samaria

road from Sychar to

hill of -

ruins of

natural scenery

mountains of -

Samaritan villages
synagogue

Samoa
Samothrace
Samson's hill
San, or Zoan
Sandovawiznia, Jews in
Sannin, hill of -
Sanour Castle -
Saone
Saphet •

Jews in

Sardis or Sart -
Sarepta or Sarfend
Saretsky, village of
Sarfend, ancient Zarepta
Sassow, village of
Jews of

Sawee
Scamander
Salagora, town of

257, 318
449

313
459
459
203
347
431

Sidro, or Sal mono - 44

Sigcum, now Jeiiesherry 347

Sihor ... 53

Sihor-Libnah - - 311

Silesia, province of - 481

— jews in - - 485

Siloam, fountain of - 153, 156

hymn on 156

village and pool 197

Simeon, tribe of - 93
Singed, village of - 207
Sipneer, village of . 177
Sipylus, Mount - - 339
Sirah, well of - 178
Sirbonian Lake - - 83
Sirocco 97
Slobodzi, village of - 383
Smyrna - • 327,345 a missionary station 334

Jews - - 330, 336

school - - 33-4

cypresses - 340

Solam, ancient Shunem 303

Solomon's Pools - 176, 317

Sorek, valley of - 107

Soutchava, town of - 427

Jews in • 428

Spandau - • 511
Spezzia ... 39
Stanchio, ancient Coot 325
St. Dcnys - 6
St . Julian 37
Storchnest - - 493
Stockholm, Jews in - 515
Subuste, village of - 219
Sweden, Jews in - 515
Sycamore-trees • 99
Sychar, valley of • 209 town of - 211

synagogues - 211, 215

Jacob's Well - 212

Joseph's Tomb 213

lf[iers - - 214

bazaar - - 214

Jews and Samaritans 215

Jews in - - 216

a Jew boy , • 217

Symplegadcs -' - 367
Synagogues. See under va-
rious towns.

Synagogue, ancient remains of 270

Syra (Scyros) - - 39—42

schools in - • 41

Syrophenicia • - 258

554

Tabor 276,297,298,

Tallith, description of

Tamaribk

Tamyras, river -

Tantour or Horn

Tabpanhes

Tamapol

bynagoguea

Jews in

-Popery

INDEX.

Tarichsea

Tarnow

Tarsus -

Taoutchy, village of

Tata-Maresti

Tekoah

Tel-Faramah, ruins of

Temple-wall of Jerusalem, old 191

Tenedos, island of""

Tents -

of Kedar -

Tephillin, description of
Terebinth-tree -
Tereecba
Terraces
Teshawitz, village of

conversation with

Turkey, depopulation of 339

influence of priesthood 342

Turkish coins • - 524

Turmus Aya • - 207

Tuscany, Jews in - 18,24

opposition to ) no .>-,

the truth in J "*

Tyre, now Sour - 238,259

town of - - 260

Jews in - 148,164,263

harbour - - 260

Synagogue - 263

Old - - 317

TyroptBon - • 152

Thrashing-floor

Thessalonica, Jews in

Thitcrin

Thorns and briers in J 117, 119

Palestine >

Thyatira - - 337

Tiberias • 276. 290,296

Jews in 143,148,246,291,322

Hot baths - - 295

Tiristria - - 368

Tobacco a common plant in } g-j

Palestine - i

Tombs of the Kings - 160

. of the Judges - 198

in the mosque at) ,„,
Hebron \ 181

Tomi - - - 368

Torture, ancient Dor • 228

Toulon .-- 15

Tournou • - 11

Tracts for Jews, their } 243 378

importance J'

Traenberg, Jews in - 485

Watering fields, mode of
Wells -
Wheels, Egyptian
Persian

Transfiguration, Mount of 301
Trembowla - 440

———— Jews in 440

Trevoux - • 11

Trees, few in Palestine • 100

Troas, coast of 346

Wilna, Karaite-Jews in
Windows, Eastern
Women, Eastern dress of

9S
514

67
48,89
43,59

Women. Druse

Moldavia

Wurtemburg, Jews in

Xiphos -

Yishvioth
Yoke for oxen -

Zaanaim, plain of
Zadcow, village of
^— Jews in
Zalesky, town of
- Jews in
Zalosc, town of Jews in

Zamow, Jews in

Zebulun or Abilene, valley of 310

—— town of - 310

Zebulun, prophecy regarding 285

Zeeb. SeeAchzib - 238,315

Zcitoun - - 315

Zelzah - - - 175, 199

Zenzow, village of • 468

Zephatha - - 111

Zeworak, village of - 468

Zerin, ancient Jezred - 303

Zidon 238

Zingans - - 370,372

Zion, Mount - - 132, 133

importance of a church on 131

Zloozow, village of - 460

Jews in 460

Zoan, or San, ruins, inha-) -

bitants 5 '8

Zorah 114

Zopka, village of • 411

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