Introduction

\\INTRODUCTION TO EZEKIEL 3\\

This chapter contains a further account of the prophet's call and
mission; of his preparation of him for is work; of, the persons to whom
he was sent; of what happened to him upon this; of the nature of his
office, and the work of it; and of what followed upon the renewal of
his call. His further preparation for prophesying is in \\#Eze 3:1-3\\;
where he is bid to eat the roll showed him, which he did, and found it
in his mouth as honey for sweetness; and then he receives fresh orders
to go to the people of Israel, and prophesy to them, \\#Eze 3:4\\; and,
that he might not be discouraged, an account is given beforehand of the
people to whom he was sent; of their language, behaviour, and
disposition; by which he could not expect success, \\#Eze 3:5-7\\; and, for
his further encouragement, strength, boldness, resolution, firmness,
and presence of mind, are promised him, \\#Eze 3:8,9\\; also a revelation
of mere things to him; all which he should hear, receive, and speak,
whether the people would attend to them or not; which ought to be no
discouragement to him, since it was not regarded by the Lord,
\\#Eze 3:10,11\\; then follows an account of his being lifted up by the
Spirit from the earth, when he heard a voice, which is described by the
manner and matter of it; and a noise, both of the living creature's
wings, and of the wheels he had seen in a former vision, \\#Eze 3:12,13\\;
and next of his being carried away by the same Spirit; and of the
condition he was in, in his own spirit, as he went; and of the strength
he received from the Lord; and of the place to which he, was carried;
and his state and circumstances, and time of continuance there,
\\#Eze 3:14,15\\; where, after a time mentioned, he has a fresh call to
his office, under the character of a watchman, whose business was to
hear Christ's words, and warn the house of Israel from him; and who are
distinguished into wicked and righteous; and whom the prophet was to
warn at his own peril, \\#Eze 3:16-21\\; and the chapter is concluded
with a narration of various events which befell the prophet; he is bid
by the Lord to go into the plain, which he did, and there saw the glory
of the Lord, as he had before seen it at the river Chebar; which so
affected him, that he fell upon his face, \\#Eze 3:22,23\\; the spirit
entered into him, let him on his feet, and spake with him; ordered him
what he should do himself, that he should shut himself up in his house,
\\#Eze 3:24\\; informed him what the people would do to him; bind him
with bands, that he should not come forth, \\#Eze 3:25\\; and what Christ
would do to him; strike him dumb in judgment to the people, that he
might not be a reprover of them, \\#Eze 3:26\\; but he is told that, when
the Lord spoke to him; his mouth should be opened, and he should
declare what was said to him, \\#Eze 3:27\\.