Isaiah 4:1

Isaiah 4:1

And in that day seven women shall take hold of one man,
&c.] Not in the days of Ahaz, when Pekah, son of Remaliah, slew in Judah a hundred and twenty thousand men in one day, ( 2 Chronicles 28:6 ) as Kimchi thinks; for though there was then such a destruction of men, yet at the same time two hundred thousand women, with sons and daughters, were carried captive by the Israelites, ( 2 Chronicles 28:8 ) but in the days of Vespasian and Titus, and in the time of their wars with the Jews; in which were made such slaughters of men, that there were not enough left for every woman to have a husband; and therefore "seven", or a great many, sue to one man to marry them, contrary to their natural bashfulness. It is a tradition of the Jews, mentioned both by Jarchi and Kimchi, that Nebuchadnezzar ordered his army, that none of them should marry another man's wife; wherefore every woman sought to get a husband; but the time of this prophecy does not agree with it: saying, we will eat our own bread, and wear our own apparel;
which used to be provided for wives by their husbands, and that according to law, ( Exodus 21:10 ) but rather than be without a husband, they promise, in order to engage him to marry them, to provide food and raiment for themselves, by their own labour. The Arabic version adds,

``neither in anything will we be troublesome:''
only let us be called by thy name;
let us be married to thee, let us become thy wives; for upon marriage the woman was called by her husband's name: to take away our reproach:
of being unmarried, and having no offspring: or it may be rendered in the imperative, "take away our reproach" F12; so the Targum, Septuagint, and Oriental versions. The words may be accommodated in a spiritual sense to some professors of religion, who lay hold on Christ in a professional way, but spend their money for that which is not bread, and live upon their own duties and services, and not on Christ, and wear their own rags of righteousness, and not his robe; only they desire to be called by the name of Christians, to take away the reproach of being reckoned Pagans or infidels.
FOOTNOTES:

F12 (wntprx Poa) "aufer probrum nostrum", Junius & Tremellius, Piscator; "aufer ignominiam nostram", Cocceius.
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