Isaiah 53:4

Isaiah 53:4

Surely he hath borne our griefs, and carried our sorrows
Or "nevertheless", as Gussetius F11; notwithstanding the above usage of him; though it is a certain and undoubted truth, that Christ not only assumed a true human nature, capable of sorrow and grief, but he took all the natural sinless infirmities of it; or his human nature was subject to such, as hunger, thirst, weariness; and to all the sorrow and pain arising from them; the same sorrows and griefs he was liable to as we are, and therefore called ours and hence he had a sympathy with men under affliction and trouble; and, to show his sympathizing spirit, he healed all sorts of bodily diseases; and also, to show his power, he healed the diseases of the soul, by bearing the sins of his people, and making satisfaction for them; since he that could do the one could do the other; wherefore the evangelist applies this passage to the healing of bodily diseases, ( Matthew 8:17 ) , though the principal meaning of the words may be, that all the sorrows and griefs which Christ bore were not for any sins of his own, but for the sins of his people; wherefore these griefs and sorrows signify the punishment of sin, and are put for sins, the cause of them and so the apostle interprets them of Christ's bearing our sins in his own body on the tree, ( 1 Peter 2:24 ) , and the Septuagint and Arabic versions render the words here, "he bears our sins"; and the Targum is,

``wherefore he will entreat for our sins;''
these being laid upon him, as is afterwards said, were bore by him as the surety of his people; and satisfaction being made for them by his sufferings and death, they are carried and taken away, never to be seen any more: yet we did esteem him stricken, smitten of God, and afflicted;
so indeed he was by the sword of divine justice, which was awaked against him, and with which he was stricken and smitten, as standing in the room of his people; but then it was not for any sin of his own, as the Jews imagined, but for the sins of those for whom he was a substitute; they looked upon all his sorrows and troubles in life, and at death, as the just judgment of God upon him for some gross enormities he had been guilty of; but in this they were mistaken. The Vulgate Latin version is, "we esteemed him as a leprous person"; and so Aquila and Symmachus render the word; and from hence the Jews call the Messiah a leper F12; they say,
``a leper of the house of Rabbi is his name''
as it is said, "surely he hath borne our griefs"; which shows that the ancient Jews understood this prophecy of the Messiah, though produced to prove a wrong character of him; and so it is applied unto him in other ancient writings of theirs; (See Gill on Matthew 8:17). The words are by some rendered, "and we reckoned him the stricken, smitten of God" F13, and "humbled"; which version of the words proved the conversion of several Jews in Africa, as Andradius and others relate {n}; by which they perceived the passage is to be understood not of a mere man, but of God made man, and of his humiliation and sufferings in human nature.
FOOTNOTES:

F11 Ebr. Comment. p. 41. (Nka) "verumtamen", Junius & Tremellius, Piscator; "et tamen", so some is Vatablus.
F12 T. Bab. Sanhedrin, fol. 98. 2.
F13 (Myhla hkm) "percussum Deum", Sanctius.
F14 Vid. Sanctium in loc.
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