Introduction

\\INTRODUCTION TO PSALM 127\\ \\<>\\. This psalm was written for Solomon; that is, for the sake of Solomon, as Aben Ezra interprets it; of concerning Solomon, as Jarchi: and so the Syriac title, ``it was said by David concerning Solomon.'' Perhaps it was composed by David, after Nathan had informed him, that not he, but his son Solomon, should build a temple for the Lord; and when he had made provision of gold and silver, and other things, for it, and had given the pattern of it to his son; and encouraged and animated him to it, assuring him that the Lord would be with him until he had finished it; and prayed that God would give him a perfect heart to do it; for he knew the whole success depended upon the Lord, notwithstanding all the preparations he had made: hence the psalm begins, "except the Lord build the house"; see \\#1Ch 28:20 29:19\\. Theodoret is of opinion it was written for Zerubbabel, and respects the building of the second temple by him; who is called Solomon, because he descended from him, and restored his work; but Zerubbabel, though he was of the house of David, yet not in the line of Solomon, but of Nathan, \\#Lu 3:27,31\\. The inscription of the Syriac version seems to agree with this conjecture; which adds, to what is before observed, ``and it is also said concerning Haggai and Zechariah, who were solicitous for the building of the temple.'' And Arama the Jew says, that it is possible it may be said of the building of the second temple, and the walls of Jerusalem. But others think it is a composition of Solomon himself; who might set out upon the building of the temple with this song, as he made a prayer at the dedication of it when finished: and the Targum renders it, ``a song by the hand of Solomon;'' and our translators for the most part render the particle of, which they here translate "for", as "of David", in many places. And so accordingly it may be rendered here "of Solomon" {s}, or Solomon's, and be one of the thousand and five songs he made; which, besides that called the Song of Solomon, is the only one extant: and the doctrine of it agrees with many things in the books of Proverbs and Ecclesiastes; that all things depend upon the providence and blessing of God, without which all the endeavours of men are in vain. Kimchi thinks the Messiah is meant, who is often called Solomon in the book of Canticles, \\#So 3:7,11 8:11,12\\; and to whom many passages in it may be applied. {s} \^hmlvl\^ "Salomonis", V. L. Tigurine version, Musculus, Muis, Cocceius, Gejerus; so Ainsworth; "ipsius Selomoh", Vatablus.