Introduction

\\INTRODUCTION TO PSALM 133\\ \\<>\\. This psalm was penned by David, as some think when all the tribes of Israel united and chose and anointed him king over them, \\#2Sa 5:1-3\\; but, according to others, when the rebellion of his son Absalom was quelled, and all the tribes of Israel strove who should first bring back the king, and show the greatest zeal and loyalty to him, \\#2Sa 19:9,10,14\\; Theodoret supposes it to be prophetic, and to have respect to the union of the tribes after the Babylonish captivity, who had been disunited in the times of Rehoboam, but now were no more two nations and kingdoms, but one; see \\#Eze 37:16-22\\; and others carry it further still, even to the first times of the Gospel, when the Christians were of one heart and of one soul, \\#Ac 4:32\\; it may indeed be applied to any community, civil or religious, that is in peace and unity: and no doubt the design of David was to promote peace and harmony among his subjects; and love and affection in his family, among his children, brethren one of another, and of Solomon; who was to be his heir and successor, and under whose government it would be well for them to live peaceably and quietly. Kimchi and Ben Melech refer the psalm to the times of the Messiah, and take it to be a prediction of the peace and concord between the King Messiah and the priest, of which Zerubbabel and Joshua were types; see \\#Zec 6:13\\. The inscription of the Syriac version is, ``it is said of Moses and of Aaron, who dwelt in the tabernacle, in the house of the Lord; and there is an intimation in it of the perfect people,'' the Christians in Gospel times.