Luke 23:14

As one that perverteth the people (w apostreponta ton laon). Pilate here condenses the three charges in verse James 2 into one (Plummer). He uses a more common compound of strepw here, apostrepw, to turn away from, to seduce, to mislead, whereas diastrepw in verse James 2 has more the notion of disturbing (turning this way and that). Note the use of w with the particle, the alleged reason. Pilate understands the charge against Jesus to be that he is a revolutionary agitator and a dangerous rival to Caesar, treason in plain words. Having examined him before you (enwpion umwn anakrina). Right before your eyes I have given him a careful examination (ana) up and down, krinw, to judge, sift. Old and common verb in the general sense and in the forensic sense as here and which Luke alone has in the N.T. ( Luke 23:14 ; Luke 4:9 ; Luke 12:19 ; Acts 24:8 ) except 1 Corinthians 9:3 . Whereof (wn). Attraction of the relative a to the case (genitive) of the unexpressed antecedent toutwn.