Revelation 21:5

Behold, I make all things new (Idou kaina poiw panta). The first time since Isaiah 1:8 that God has been represented as speaking directly, though voices have come out of the throne before ( Isaiah 21:3 ) and out of the sanctuary ( Isaiah 16:1 Isaiah 16:17 ), which may be from God himself, though more likely from one of the angels of the Presence. This message is not addressed to John ( Isaiah 7:14 ; Isaiah 17:7 ; Isaiah 21:6 ; Isaiah 22:6 ), but to the entire world of the blessed. See Isaiah 43:18 for the words (Idou egw poiw kaina). The idea of a new heaven and a new earth is in Isaiah 65:17 ; Isaiah 66:22 ; Psalms 102:25 . For the locative here with epi (epi twi qronwi) see Revelation 7:10 ; Revelation 19:4 (genitive more usual, Revelation 4:9 ; Rev 5:1 Rev 5:7 Rev 5:13 , etc.). See Revelation 20:11 for the picture. And he saith (kai legei). Probably this means a change of speakers, made plain by moi (to me) in many MSS. An angel apparently (as in Revelation 14:13 ; Revelation 19:9 ) assures John and urges him to write (grapson as in Revelation 1:11 ; Rev 2:1 Rev 2:8 Rev 2:12 Rev 2:18 ; Rev 3:1 Rev 3:7 Rev 3:14 ; Revelation 14:3 ). The reason given (oti, for) is precisely the saying in Revelation 22:6 and he uses the two adjectives (pistoi kai alhqinoi) employed in Revelation 19:11 about God himself, and Revelation 3:14 about Christ. In Revelation 19:9 alhqinoi occurs also about "the words of God" as here. They are reliable and genuine.