Cinnamon

Cinnamon [N] [S]

Heb. kinamon, the Cinnamomum zeylanicum of botanists, a tree of the Laurel family, which grows only in India on the Malabar coast, in Ceylon, and China. There is no trace of it in Egypt, and it was unknown in Syria. The inner rind when dried and rolled into cylinders forms the cinnamon of commerce. The fruit and coarser pieces of bark when boiled yield a fragrant oil. It was one of the principal ingredients in the holy anointing oil ( Exodus 30:23 ). It is mentioned elsewhere only in Proverbs 7:17 ; Cant. 4:14 ; Revelation 18:13 . The mention of it indicates a very early and extensive commerce carried on between Palestine and the East.

These dictionary topics are from
M.G. Easton M.A., D.D., Illustrated Bible Dictionary, Third Edition,
published by Thomas Nelson, 1897. Public Domain, copy freely.

[N] indicates this entry was also found in Nave's Topical Bible
[S] indicates this entry was also found in Smith's Bible Dictionary

Bibliography Information

Easton, Matthew George. "Entry for Cinnamon". "Easton's Bible Dictionary". .

Cinnamon, [N] [E]

a well-known aromatic substance, the rind of the Laurus cinnamomum , called Korunda-gauhah in Ceylon. It is mentioned in ( Exodus 30:23 ) as one of the component parts of the holy anointing oil. In ( Revelation 18:13 ) it is enumerated among the merchandise of the great Babylon.


[N] indicates this entry was also found in Nave's Topical Bible
[E] indicates this entry was also found in Easton's Bible Dictionary

Bibliography Information

Smith, William, Dr. "Entry for 'Cinnamon,'". "Smith's Bible Dictionary". . 1901.

CINNAMON

sin'-a-mun (qinnamon; kinnamomon):

Mentioned, like cassia, as a perfume. In Exodus 30:23 it is one of the ingredients of the "holy anointing oil"; in Proverbs 7:17 it is, along with myrrh and aloes, a perfume for a bed; in Song of Solomon 4:14 it is a very precious spice. Cinnamon is (Revelation 18:13) part of the merchandise of "Babylon the great."

Cinnamon is the product of Cinnamomum zeylanicum, a laurel-like plant widely cultivated in Ceylon and Java. It has a profuse white blossom, succeeded by a nut from which the fragrant oil is obtained. The wood is the inner bark from branches which have reached a diameter of from 2 to 3 inches; the epidermis and pulpy matter are carefully scraped off before drying. In commerce the cheaper Cassia ligra of China is sometimes substituted for true cinnamon, and it is thought by some authorities that this was the true cinnamon of the ancients.

See, however, CASSIA.

E. W. G. Masterman


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography Information
Orr, James, M.A., D.D. General Editor. "Entry for 'CINNAMON'". "International Standard Bible Encyclopedia". 1915.