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Parlour

Parlour

(from the Fr. parler, "to speak") denotes an "audience chamber," but that is not the import of the Hebrew word so rendered. It corresponds to what the Turks call a kiosk, as in Judges 3:20 (the "summer parlour"), or as in the margin of the Revised Version ("the upper chamber of cooling"), a small room built on the roof of the house, with open windows to catch the breeze, and having a door communicating with the outside by which persons seeking an audience may be admitted. While Eglon was resting in such a parlour, Ehud, under pretence of having a message from God to him, was admitted into his presence, and murderously plunged his dagger into his body (21,22).

The "inner parlours" in 1 Chronicles 28:11 were the small rooms or chambers which Solomon built all round two sides and one end of the temple ( 1 Kings 6:5 ), "side chambers;" or they may have been, as some think, the porch and the holy place.

In 1 Samuel 9:22 the Revised Version reads "guest chamber," a chamber at the high place specially used for sacrificial feasts.

These dictionary topics are from
M.G. Easton M.A., D.D., Illustrated Bible Dictionary, Third Edition,
published by Thomas Nelson, 1897. Public Domain, copy freely.

Bibliography Information

Easton, Matthew George. "Entry for Parlour". "Easton's Bible Dictionary". .