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Compare Translations for Exodus 21:7

Exodus 21:7 ASV
And if a man sell his daughter to be a maid-servant, she shall not go out as the men-servants do.
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Exodus 21:7 BBE
And if a man gives his daughter for a price to be a servant, she is not to go away free as the men-servants do.
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Exodus 21:7 CEB
When a man sells his daughter as a slave, she shouldn't be set free in the same way as male slaves are set free.
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Exodus 21:7 CJB
"If a man sells his daughter as a slave, she is not to go free like the men-slaves.
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Exodus 21:7 RHE
If any man sell his daughter to be a servant, she shall not go out as bondwomen are wont to go out.
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Exodus 21:7 ESV
"When a man sells his daughter as a slave, she shall not go out as the male slaves do.
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Exodus 21:7 GW
"Whenever a man sells his daughter into slavery, she will not go free the way male slaves do.
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Exodus 21:7 GNT
"If a man sells his daughter as a slave, she is not to be set free, as male slaves are.
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Exodus 21:7 HNV
"If a man sells his daughter to be a maid-servant, she shall not go out as the men-servants do.
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Exodus 21:7 CSB
"When a man sells his daughter as a slave, she is not to leave as the male slaves do.
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Exodus 21:7 KJV
And if a man sell his daughter to be a maidservant, she shall not go out as the menservants do .
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Exodus 21:7 LEB
" 'And if a man sells his daughter as a slave woman, she will not go out as male slaves go out.
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Exodus 21:7 NAS
"If a man sells his daughter as a female slave, she is not to go free as the male slaves do.
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Exodus 21:7 NCV
"If a man sells his daughter as a slave, the rules for setting her free are different from the rules for setting the male slaves free.
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Exodus 21:7 NIRV
"Suppose a man sells his daughter as a servant. Then she can't go free as male servants do.
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Exodus 21:7 NIV
"If a man sells his daughter as a servant, she is not to go free as menservants do.
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Exodus 21:7 NKJV
"And if a man sells his daughter to be a female slave, she shall not go out as the male slaves do.
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Exodus 21:7 NLT
"When a man sells his daughter as a slave, she will not be freed at the end of six years as the men are.
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Exodus 21:7 NRS
When a man sells his daughter as a slave, she shall not go out as the male slaves do.
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Exodus 21:7 RSV
"When a man sells his daughter as a slave, she shall not go out as the male slaves do.
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Exodus 21:7 DBY
And if a man shall sell his daughter as a handmaid, she shall not go out as the bondmen go out.
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Exodus 21:7 MSG
"When a man sells his daughter to be a handmaid, she doesn't go free after six years like the men.
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Exodus 21:7 WBT
And if a man shall sell his daughter to be a maid-servant, she shall not depart as the men-servants do.
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Exodus 21:7 TMB
"And if a man sell his daughter to be a maidservant, she shall not go out as the menservants do.
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Exodus 21:7 TNIV
"If a man sells his daughter as a servant, she is not to go free as male servants do.
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Exodus 21:7 TYN
Yf a man sell his doughter to be a servaunte: she shall not goo out as the men servauntes doo.
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Exodus 21:7 WEB
"If a man sells his daughter to be a maid-servant, she shall not go out as the men-servants do.
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Exodus 21:7 WYC
If any man selleth his daughter into a servantess, she shall not go out as handmaids were wont to go out; (If any man selleth his daughter to be a slave-girl, she shall not go out free like slaves can go out free;)
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Exodus 21:7 YLT
`And when a man selleth his daughter for a handmaid, she doth not go out according to the going out of the men-servants;
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Exodus 21 Commentary - Matthew Henry Commentary on the Whole Bible (Concise)

Chapter 21

Laws respecting servants. (1-11) Judicial laws. (12-21) Judicial laws. (22-36)

Verses 1-11 The laws in this chapter relate to the fifth and sixth commandments; and though they differ from our times and customs, nor are they binding on us, yet they explain the moral law, and the rules of natural justice. The servant, in the state of servitude, was an emblem of that state of bondage to sin, Satan, and the law, which man is brought into by robbing God of his glory, by the transgression of his precepts. Likewise in being made free, he was an emblem of that liberty wherewith Christ, the Son of God, makes free from bondage his people, who are free indeed; and made so freely, without money and without price, of free grace.

Verses 12-21 God, who by his providence gives and maintains life, by his law protects it. A wilful murderer shall be taken even from God's altar. But God provided cities of refuge to protect those whose unhappiness it was, and not their fault, to cause the death of another; for such as by accident, when a man is doing a lawful act, without intent of hurt, happens to kill another. Let children hear the sentence of God's word upon the ungrateful and disobedient; and remember that God will certainly requite it, if they have ever cursed their parents, even in their hearts, or have lifted up their hands against them, except they repent, and flee for refuge to the Saviour. And let parents hence learn to be very careful in training up their children, setting them a good example, especially in the government of their passions, and in praying for them; taking heed not to provoke them to wrath. Through poverty the Israelites sometimes sold themselves or their children; magistrates sold some persons for their crimes, and creditors were in some cases allowed to sell their debtors who could not pay. But "man-stealing," the object of which is to force another into slavery, is ranked in the New Testament with the greatest crimes. Care is here taken, that satisfaction be made for hurt done to a person, though death do not follow. The gospel teaches masters to forbear, and to moderate threatenings, ( Ephesians 6:9 ) , considering with Job, What shall I do, when God riseth up? ( Job 31:13 Job 31:14 ) .

Verses 22-36 The cases here mentioned give rules of justice then, and still in use, for deciding similar matters. We are taught by these laws, that we must be very careful to do no wrong, either directly or indirectly. If we have done wrong, we must be very willing to make it good, and be desirous that nobody may lose by us.

Exodus 21 Commentary - Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

CHAPTER 21

Exodus 21:1-6 . LAWS FOR MENSERVANTS.

1. judgments--rules for regulating the procedure of judges and magistrates in the decision of cases and the trial of criminals. The government of the Israelites being a theocracy, those public authorities were the servants of the Divine Sovereign, and subject to His direction. Most of these laws here noticed were primitive usages, founded on principles of natural equity, and incorporated, with modifications and improvements, in the Mosaic code.

2-6. If thou buy an Hebrew servant--Every Israelite was free-born; but slavery was permitted under certain restrictions. An Hebrew might be made a slave through poverty, debt, or crime; but at the end of six years he was entitled to freedom, and his wife, if she had voluntarily shared his state of bondage, also obtained release. Should he, however, have married a female slave, she and the children, after the husband's liberation, remained the master's property; and if, through attachment to his family, the Hebrew chose to forfeit his privilege and abide as he was, a formal process was gone through in a public court, and a brand of servitude stamped on his ear ( Psalms 40:6 ) for life, or at least till the Jubilee ( Deuteronomy 15:17 ).

Exodus 21:7-36 . LAWS FOR MAIDSERVANTS.

7-11. if a man sell his daughter--Hebrew girls might be redeemed for a reasonable sum. But in the event of her parents or friends being unable to pay the redemption money, her owner was not at liberty to sell her elsewhere. Should she have been betrothed to him or his son, and either change their minds, a maintenance must be provided for her suitable to her condition as his intended wife, or her freedom instantly granted.

23-25. eye for eye--The law which authorized retaliation (a principle acted upon by all primitive people) was a civil one. It was given to regulate the procedure of the public magistrate in determining the amount of compensation in every case of injury, but did not encourage feelings of private revenge. The later Jews, however, mistook it for a moral precept, and were corrected by our Lord ( Matthew 5:38-42 ).

28-36. If an ox gore a man or a woman, that they die--For the purpose of sanctifying human blood, and representing all injuries affecting life in a serious light, an animal that occasioned death was to be killed or suffer punishment proportioned to the degree of damage it had caused. Punishments are still inflicted on this principle in Persia and other countries of the East; and among a rude people greater effect is thus produced in inspiring caution, and making them keep noxious animals under restraint, than a penalty imposed on the owners.

30. If there be laid on him a sum of money, &c.--Blood fines are common among the Arabs as they were once general throughout the East. This is the only case where a money compensation, instead of capital punishment, was expressly allowed in the Mosaic law.