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William Taylor

William Taylor, A. M.—This worthy person was bor n at Keighley in Yorkshire, September 30, 1616, and educated in Magdalen-hall, Oxford. Having finished his studies at the university, he was employed for some time in the capacity of schoolmaster, at Keniton in Herefordshire, and afterwards at Cirencester in Gloucestershire. At the latter place he succeeded one Mr. Henry Toppe, who is said to have been ejected by the puritanical townsmen. In the year lo'42 the place was stormed and taken by the royal forces, when Taylor was ejected, and Toppe restored. Mr. Taylor being driven from the place, retired to London, became minister at Bow, near the city, and afterwards at St. Stephen's church, Coleman-street, in the place of Mr. John Goodwin, who was turned out by the parliament. Here he met with considerable opposition, and therefore resigned the place; upon which he preached for some time in a church in Woodstreet, and delivered a lecture every Lord's day at St. Giles's, Cripplegate, and another on a week day at St. Peter's, Cornhill. It is said, that he was afterwards called by the rump parliament to his former charge in Coleman-street, which he kept to the day of his death ;• but, from the register of the place, this manifestly appears to be a mistake.t Dr. Calamy says he was ejected from St. Stephen's, Coleman-street, after the restoration, but he afterwards corrected his improper statement.* Mr. Taylor united with his brethren, the London ministers, in their declaration against the death of King Charles; when, it appears, he was pastor at the above place.} He published several sermons, one of which is in the " Morning Exercise at St. Giles's," on Christ's Exaltation; and collected and revised several of Mr. Christopher Love's sermons, to which he prefixed recommendatory epistles. He died September 5,1661, and his remains were interred in the chancel of the above church. Dr. William Spurstowe preached and published his funeral sermon, giving a high commendation of his character. Wood denominates him

• Wood's Athenae Oxon. vol. ii. p. 169. + Rennet's Chronicle, p. 793. X Calamy's Account, vol. ii. p. 39—Continuation, vol. i. p. 58. S Ibid. vol. ii. p. 7-44.

"a frequent preacher, a laborious divine, a learned man in his profession, and a zealous and loyal presbyterian."#