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Compare Translations for Isaiah 20:1

Isaiah 20:1 ASV
In the year that Tartan came unto Ashdod, when Sargon the king of Assyria sent him, and he fought against Ashdod and took it;
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Isaiah 20:1 BBE
In the year when the Tartan came to Ashdod, sent by Sargon, king of Assyria, and made war against it and took it;
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Isaiah 20:1 CEB
In the year that Assyria's King Sargon sent his general to Ashdod, he fought against Ashdod and captured it.
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Isaiah 20:1 CJB
In the year that Sargon the king of Ashur sent his commander-in-chief to attack Ashdod, he captured it.
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Isaiah 20:1 RHE
In the year that Tharthan entered into Azotus, when Sargon the king of the Assyrians had sent him, and he had fought against Azotus, and had taken it:
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Isaiah 20:1 ESV
In the year that the commander in chief, who was sent by Sargon the king of Assyria, came to Ashdod and fought against it and captured it--
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Isaiah 20:1 GW
In the year when King Sargon of Assyria sent his commander-in-chief to fight against Ashdod, he captured it.
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Isaiah 20:1 GNT
Under the orders of Emperor Sargon of Assyria, the commander-in-chief of the Assyrian army attacked the Philistine city of Ashdod.
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Isaiah 20:1 HNV
In the year that Tartan came to Ashdod, when Sargon the king of Ashshur sent him, and he fought against Ashdod and took it;
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Isaiah 20:1 CSB
In the year that the commander-in-chief, sent by Sargon king of Assyria, came to Ashdod and attacked and captured it-
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Isaiah 20:1 KJV
In the year that Tartan came unto Ashdod, (when Sargon the king of Assyria sent him,) and fought against Ashdod, and took it;
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Isaiah 20:1 LEB
In [the] year {the commander-in-chief came} to Ashdod, when Sargon the king of Assyria sent him, and he fought against Ashdod and he took it,
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Isaiah 20:1 NAS
In the year that the commander came to Ashdod, when Sargon the king of Assyria sent him and he fought against Ashdod and captured it,
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Isaiah 20:1 NCV
Sargon king of Assyria sent a military com mander to Ashdod to attack that city. So the commander attacked and captured it.
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Isaiah 20:1 NIRV
Sargon sent his highest commander to the city of Ashdod. He attacked it and captured it. Sargon was king of Assyria.
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Isaiah 20:1 NIV
In the year that the supreme commander, sent by Sargon king of Assyria, came to Ashdod and attacked and captured it--
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Isaiah 20:1 NKJV
In the year that Tartan came to Ashdod, when Sargon the king of Assyria sent him, and he fought against Ashdod and took it,
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Isaiah 20:1 NLT
In the year when King Sargon of Assyria captured the Philistine city of Ashdod,
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Isaiah 20:1 NRS
In the year that the commander-in-chief, who was sent by King Sargon of Assyria, came to Ashdod and fought against it and took it—
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Isaiah 20:1 RSV
In the year that the commander in chief, who was sent by Sargon the king of Assyria, came to Ashdod and fought against it and took it, --
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Isaiah 20:1 DBY
In the year that Tartan came to Ashdod, when Sargon the king of Assyria sent him, (and he fought against Ashdod and took it,)
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Isaiah 20:1 MSG
In the year the field commander, sent by King Sargon of Assyria, came to Ashdod and fought and took it,
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Isaiah 20:1 WBT
In the year that Tartan came to Ashdod, (when Sargon the king of Assyria sent him,) and fought against Ashdod, and took it;
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Isaiah 20:1 TMB
In the year that Tartan came unto Ashdod (when Sargon the king of Assyria sent him), and fought against Ashdod and took it,
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Isaiah 20:1 TNIV
In the year that the supreme commander, sent by Sargon king of Assyria, came to Ashdod and attacked and captured it--
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Isaiah 20:1 WEB
In the year that Tartan came to Ashdod, when Sargon the king of Assyria sent him, and he fought against Ashdod and took it;
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Isaiah 20:1 WYC
In the year wherein Tartan entered into Ashdod, when Sargon, the king of Assyrians (the king of Assyria), had sent him, and he had fought against Ashdod, and had taken it;
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Isaiah 20:1 YLT
In the year of the coming in of Tartan to Ashdod, when Sargon king of Asshur sendeth him, and he fighteth against Ashdod, and captureth it,
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Isaiah 20 Commentary - Matthew Henry Commentary on the Whole Bible (Concise)

Chapter 20

The invasion and conquest of Egypt and Ethiopia.

- Isaiah was a sign to the people by his unusual dress, when he walked abroad. He commonly wore sackcloth as a prophet, to show himself mortified to the world. He was to loose this from his loins; to wear no upper garments, and to go barefooted. This sign was to signify, that the Egyptians and Ethiopians should be led away captives by the king of Assyria, thus stripped. The world will often deem believers foolish, when singular in obedience to God. But the Lord will support his servants under the most trying effects of their obedience; and what they are called upon to suffer for his sake, commonly is light, compared with what numbers groan under from year to year from sin. Those who make any creature their expectation and glory, and so put it in the place of God, will, sooner or later, be ashamed of it. But disappointment in creature-confidences, instead of driving us to despair, should drive us to God, and our expectation shall not be in vain. The same lesson is in force now; and where shall we look for aid in the hour of necessity, but to the Lord our Righteousness?

Isaiah 20 Commentary - Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

CHAPTER 20

Isaiah 20:1-6 . CONTINUATION OF THE SUBJECT OF THE NINETEENTH CHAPTER, BUT AT A LATER DATE. CAPTIVITY OF EGYPT AND ETHIOPIA.

In the reign of Sargon (722-715 B.C.), the successor of Shalmaneser, an Assyrian invasion of Egypt took place. Its success is here foretold, and hence a party among the Jews is warned of the folly of their "expectation" of aid from Egypt or Ethiopia. At a later period ( Isaiah 18:1-7 ), when Tirhakah of Ethiopia was their ally, the Ethiopians are treated as friends, to whom God announces the overthrow of the common Assyrian foe, Sennacherib. Egypt and Ethiopia in this chapter ( Isaiah 20:3 Isaiah 20:4 ) are represented as allied together, the result no doubt of fear of the common foe; previously they had been at strife, and the Ethiopian king had, just before Sethos usurpation, withdrawn from occupation of part of Lower Egypt. Hence, "Egypt" is mentioned alone in Isaiah 19:1-25 , which refers to a somewhat earlier stage of the same event: a delicate mark of truth. Sargon seems to have been the king who finished the capture of Samaria which Shalmaneser began; the alliance of Hoshea with So or Sabacho II of Ethiopia, and his refusal to pay the usual tribute, provoked Shalmaneser to the invasion. On clay cylindrical seals found in Sennacherib's palace at Koyunjik, the name of Sabacho is deciphered; the two seals are thought, from the inscriptions, to have been attached to the treaty of peace between Egypt and Assyria, which resulted from the invasion of Egypt by Sargon, described in this chapter; 2 Kings 18:10 curiously confirms the view derived from Assyrian inscriptions, that though Shalmaneser began, Sargon finished the conquest of Samaria; "they took it" (compare 2 Kings 17:4-6 ). In Sargon's palace at Khorsabad, inscriptions state that 27,280 Israelites were led captive by the founder of the palace. While Shalmaneser was engaged in the siege of Samaria, Sargon probably usurped the supreme power and destroyed him; the siege began in 723 B.C., and ended in 721 B.C., the first year of Sargon's reign. Hence arises the paucity of inscriptions of the two predecessors of Sargon. Tiglath-pileser and Shalmaneser; the usurper destroyed them, just as Tiglath-pileser destroyed those of Pul (Sardanapalus), the last of the old line of Ninus; the names of his father and grandfather, which have been deciphered in the palace of his son Sennacherib, do not appear in the list of Assyrian kings, which confirms the view that he was a satrap who usurped the throne. He was so able a general that Hezekiah made no attempt to shake off the tribute until the reign of Sennacherib; hence Judah was not invaded now as the lands of the Philistines and Egypt were. After conquering Israel he sent his general, Tartan, to attack the Philistine cities, "Ashdod," &c., preliminary to his invasion of Egypt and Ethiopia; for the line of march to Egypt lay along the southwest coast of Palestine. The inscriptions confirm the prophecy; they tell us he received tribute from a Pharaoh of "Egypt"; besides destroying in part the Ethiopian "No-ammon," or Thebes ( Nahum 3:8 ); also that he warred with the kings of "Ashdod," Gaza, &c., in harmony with Isaiah here; a memorial tablet of him is found in Cyprus also, showing that he extended his arms to that island. His reign was six or seven years in duration, 722-715 B.C. [G. V. SMITH].

1. Tartan--probably the same general as was sent by Sennacherib against Hezekiah ( 2 Kings 18:17 ). GESENIUS takes "Tartan" as a title.
Ashdod--called by the Greeks Azotus ( Acts 8:40 ); on the Mediterranean, one of the "five" cities of the Philistines. The taking of it was a necessary preliminary to the invasion of Egypt, to which it was the key in that quarter, the Philistines being allies of Egypt. So strongly did the Assyrians fortify it that it stood a twenty-nine years' siege, when it was retaken by the Egyptian Psammetichus.
sent--Sargon himself remained behind engaged with the Phoenician cities, or else led the main force more directly into Egypt out of Judah [G. V. SMITH].

2. by--literally, "by the hand of" (compare Ezekiel 3:14 ).
sackcloth--the loose outer garment of coarse dark hair-cloth worn by mourners ( 2 Samuel 3:31 ) and by prophets, fastened at the waist by a girdle ( Matthew 3:4 , 2 Kings 1:8 , Zechariah 13:4 ).
naked--rather, "uncovered"; he merely put off the outer sackcloth, retaining still the tunic or inner vest ( 1 Samuel 19:24 , Amos 2:16 , John 21:7 ); an emblem to show that Egypt should be stripped of its possessions; the very dress of Isaiah was a silent exhortation to repentance.

3. three years--Isaiah's symbolical action did not continue' all this time, but at intervals, to keep it before the people's mind during that period [ROSENMULLER]. Rather, join "three years" with "sign," a three years' sign, that is, a sign that a three years' calamity would come on Egypt and Ethiopia [BARNES], ( Isaiah 8:18 ). This is the only instance of a strictly symbolical act performed by Isaiah. With later prophets, as Jeremiah and Ezekiel, such acts were common. In some cases they were performed, not literally, but only in prophetic vision.
wonder--rather, "omen"; conveying a threat as to the future [G. V. SMITH].
upon--in reference to, against.

4. buttocks uncovered--Belzoni says that captives are found represented thus on Egyptian monuments ( Isaiah 47:2 Isaiah 47:3 , Nahum 3:5 Nahum 3:8 Nahum 3:9 ), where as here, Egypt and Ethiopia are mentioned as in alliance.

5. they--the Philistine allies of Egypt who trusted in it for help against Assyria. A warning to the party among the Jews, who, though Judah was then the subordinate ally of Assyria, were looking to Egypt as a preferable ally ( Isaiah 30:7 ). Ethiopia was their "expectation"; for Palestine had not yet obtained, but hoped for alliance with it. Egypt was their "glory," that is, boast ( Isaiah 13:19 ); for the alliance with it was completed.

6. isle--that is, coast on the Mediterranean--Philistia, perhaps Phoenicia (compare Isaiah 23:2 , 11:11 , 13:22 , Psalms 72:10 ).
we--emphatical; if Egypt, in which we trusted, was overcome, how shall we, a small weak state, escape?