Acts 28:11-16 LEB

Paul Arrives in Rome at Last

11 Now after three months we put out to sea in a ship that had wintered at the island, an Alexandrian [one] {with the twin gods Castor and Pollux as its insignia}.a

References for Acts 28:11

    • Ԋ 28:11 - Literally "marked with the Dioscuri" (a joint name for the twin gods Castor and Pollux)
      12 And putting in at Syracuse, we stayed [there] three days.
      13 From there we got underwayb [and]c arrived at Rhegium, and after one day a south wind came up [and]d on the second day we came to Puteoli,

      References for Acts 28:13

        • ԋ 28:13 - Or "we sailed along" (with "the coast" understood); the exact meaning of the text as it stands is disputed and various additional terms have to be supplied in any case
        • Ԍ 28:13 - *Here "[and]" is supplied because the previous participle ("got underway") has been translated as a finite verb
        • ԍ 28:13 - *Here "[and]" is supplied because the previous participle ("came up") has been translated as a finite verb
          14 where we found brothers, [and]e were implored to stay with them seven days. And in this way we came to Rome.

          References for Acts 28:14

            • Ԏ 28:14 - *Here "[and]" is supplied because the previous participle ("found") has been translated as a finite verb
              15 And from there the brothers, [when they]f heard the [news] about us, came to meet us as far as the Forum of Appius and Three Taverns. [When he]g saw them, Paul gave thanks to God [and]h took courage.

              References for Acts 28:15

                • ԏ 28:15 - *Here "[when]" is supplied as a component of the participle ("heard") which is understood as temporal
                • Ԑ 28:15 - *Here "[when]" is supplied as a component of the participle ("saw") which is understood as temporal
                • ԑ 28:15 - *Here "[and]" is supplied because the previous participle ("gave thanks") has been translated as a finite verb
                  16 And when we entered into Rome, Paul was allowed to stay by himself with the soldier who was guarding him.