Compare Translations for Leviticus 14:35

  • Leviticus 14:35 (ASV) then he that owneth the house shall come and tell the priest, saying, There seemeth to me to be as it were a plague in the house.

  • Leviticus 14:35 (BBE) Then let the owner of the house come and say to the priest, It seems to me that there is a sort of leper's disease in the house.

  • Leviticus 14:35 (CEB) the homeowner must come and tell the priest, "I think some sort of infection is in my house."

  • Leviticus 14:35 (CEBA) the homeowner must come and tell the priest, "I think some sort of infection is in my house."

  • Leviticus 14:35 (CJB) then the owner of the house is to come and tell the cohen, 'It seems to me that there may be an infection in the house.'

  • Leviticus 14:35 (CSB) the owner of the house is to come and tell the priest: Something like mildew contamination has appeared in my house.

  • Leviticus 14:35 (DBY) then he whose house it is shall come and tell the priest, saying, It seemeth to me like a plague in the house;

  • Leviticus 14:35 (ESV) then he who owns the house shall come and tell the priest, 'There seems to me to be some case of disease in my house.'

  • Leviticus 14 (GNT) The Lord gave Moses the following regulations about the ritual purification of those of you cured of a dreaded skin disease. On the day you are to be pronounced clean, you shall be brought to the priest, and the priest shall take you outside the camp and examine you. If the disease is healed, the priest shall order that two ritually clean birds be brought, along with a piece of cedar wood, a red cord, and a sprig of hyssop. Then the priest shall order that one of the birds be killed over a clay bowl containing fresh spring water. He shall take the other bird and dip it, together with the cedar wood, the red cord, and the hyssop, in the blood of the bird that was killed. He shall sprinkle the blood seven times on the one of you who is to be purified from your skin disease, and then he shall pronounce you clean. He shall let the live bird fly away over the open fields. You shall wash your clothes, shave off all your hair, and take a bath; you will then be ritually clean. You may enter the camp, but you must live outside your tent for seven days. On the seventh day you shall again shave your head, your beard, your eyebrows, and all the rest of the hair on your body; you shall wash your clothes and take a bath, and then you will be ritually clean. On the eighth day you shall bring two male lambs and one female lamb a year old that are without any defects, five pounds of flour mixed with olive oil, and half a pint of olive oil. The priest shall take you and these offerings to the entrance of the Tent of the Lord's presence. Then the priest shall take one of the male lambs and together with the half pint of oil he shall offer it as a repayment offering. He shall present them as a special gift to the Lord for the priest. He shall kill the lamb in the holy place where the animals for the sin offerings and the burnt offerings are killed. He must do this because the repayment offering, like the sin offering, belongs to the priest and is very holy. The priest shall take some of the blood of the lamb and put it on the lobe of the right ear, on the thumb of the right hand, and on the big toe of the right foot of the one of you to be declared ritually clean. The priest shall take some of the olive oil and pour it in the palm of his own left hand, dip a finger of his right hand in it, and sprinkle some of it seven times there in the Lord's presence. He shall take some of the oil that is in the palm of his hand and some of the blood of the lamb and put them on the lobe of the right ear, on the thumb of the right hand, and on the big toe of the right foot of the one of you to be declared ritually clean. He shall put the rest of the oil that is in the palm of his hand on your head. In this way he shall perform the ritual of purification. Then the priest shall offer the sin offering and perform the ritual of purification. After that, he shall kill the animal for the burnt offering and offer it with the grain offering on the altar. In this way the priest shall perform the ritual of purification, and you will be ritually clean. If you are poor and cannot afford any more, you shall bring for your purification only one male lamb as your repayment offering, a special gift to the Lord for the priest. You shall bring only two pounds of flour mixed with olive oil for a grain offering and half a pint of olive oil. You shall also bring two doves or two pigeons, one for the sin offering and one for the burnt offering. On the eighth day of your purification you shall bring them to the priest at the entrance of the Tent. The priest shall take the lamb and the olive oil and present them as a special gift to the Lord for the priest. He shall kill the lamb and take some of the blood and put it on the lobe of your right ear, on the thumb of your right hand, and on the big toe of your right foot. The priest shall pour some of the oil into the palm of his own left hand and with a finger of his right hand sprinkle some of it seven times there in the Lord's presence. He shall put some of the oil on the same places he put the blood: on the lobe of your right ear, on the thumb of your right hand, and on the big toe of your right foot. The rest of the oil that is in his palm he shall put on your head and in this way perform the ritual of purification. Then he shall offer one of the doves or pigeons as the sin offering and the other as the burnt offering with the grain offering. In this way the priest shall perform the ritual of purification. This is the law for those who have a dreaded skin disease but who cannot afford the normal offerings required for his purification. The Lord gave Moses and Aaron the following regulations about houses affected by spreading mildew. (These were to apply after the people of Israel entered the land of Canaan, which the Lord was going to give them as their possession.) If any of you find that the Lord has sent mildew on your house, then you must go and tell the priest about it. The priest shall order everything to be moved out of the house before he goes to examine the mildew; otherwise everything in the house will be declared unclean. Then he shall go to the house and examine the mildew. If there are greenish or reddish spots that appear to be eating into the wall, he shall leave the house and lock it up for seven days. On the seventh day he shall return and examine it again. If the mildew has spread, he shall order that the stones on which the mildew is found be removed and thrown into some unclean place outside the city. After that he must have all the interior walls scraped and the plaster dumped in an unclean place outside the city. Then other stones are to be used to replace the stones that were removed, and new plaster will be used to cover the walls. If the mildew breaks out again in the house after the stones have been removed and the house has been scraped and plastered, the priest shall go and look. If it has spread, the house is unclean. It must be torn down, and its stones, its wood, and all its plaster must be carried out of the city to an unclean place. Any who enter the house while it is locked up will be unclean until evening. Any who lie down or eat in the house must wash their clothes. If, when the priest comes to look, the mildew has not reappeared after the house has been replastered, he shall pronounce the house ritually clean, because the mildew has been completely removed. To purify the house, he shall take two birds, some cedar wood, a red cord, and a sprig of hyssop. He shall kill one of the birds over a clay bowl containing fresh spring water. Then he shall take the cedar wood, the hyssop, the red cord, and the live bird and shall dip them in the blood of the bird that was killed and in the fresh water. And he shall sprinkle the house seven times. In this way he shall purify the house with the bird's blood, the fresh water, the live bird, the cedar wood, the hyssop, and the red cord. Then he shall let the live bird fly away outside the city over the open fields. In this way he shall perform the ritual of purification for the house, and it will be ritually clean. These are the laws about dreaded skin diseases; sores, boils, or inflammations; and about mildew in clothes or houses. These laws determine when something is unclean and when it is clean.

  • Leviticus 14 (GNTA) The Lord gave Moses the following regulations about the ritual purification of those of you cured of a dreaded skin disease. On the day you are to be pronounced clean, you shall be brought to the priest, and the priest shall take you outside the camp and examine you. If the disease is healed, the priest shall order that two ritually clean birds be brought, along with a piece of cedar wood, a red cord, and a sprig of hyssop. Then the priest shall order that one of the birds be killed over a clay bowl containing fresh spring water. He shall take the other bird and dip it, together with the cedar wood, the red cord, and the hyssop, in the blood of the bird that was killed. He shall sprinkle the blood seven times on the one of you who is to be purified from your skin disease, and then he shall pronounce you clean. He shall let the live bird fly away over the open fields. You shall wash your clothes, shave off all your hair, and take a bath; you will then be ritually clean. You may enter the camp, but you must live outside your tent for seven days. On the seventh day you shall again shave your head, your beard, your eyebrows, and all the rest of the hair on your body; you shall wash your clothes and take a bath, and then you will be ritually clean. On the eighth day you shall bring two male lambs and one female lamb a year old that are without any defects, five pounds of flour mixed with olive oil, and half a pint of olive oil. The priest shall take you and these offerings to the entrance of the Tent of the Lord's presence. Then the priest shall take one of the male lambs and together with the half pint of oil he shall offer it as a repayment offering. He shall present them as a special gift to the Lord for the priest. He shall kill the lamb in the holy place where the animals for the sin offerings and the burnt offerings are killed. He must do this because the repayment offering, like the sin offering, belongs to the priest and is very holy. The priest shall take some of the blood of the lamb and put it on the lobe of the right ear, on the thumb of the right hand, and on the big toe of the right foot of the one of you to be declared ritually clean. The priest shall take some of the olive oil and pour it in the palm of his own left hand, dip a finger of his right hand in it, and sprinkle some of it seven times there in the Lord's presence. He shall take some of the oil that is in the palm of his hand and some of the blood of the lamb and put them on the lobe of the right ear, on the thumb of the right hand, and on the big toe of the right foot of the one of you to be declared ritually clean. He shall put the rest of the oil that is in the palm of his hand on your head. In this way he shall perform the ritual of purification. Then the priest shall offer the sin offering and perform the ritual of purification. After that, he shall kill the animal for the burnt offering and offer it with the grain offering on the altar. In this way the priest shall perform the ritual of purification, and you will be ritually clean. If you are poor and cannot afford any more, you shall bring for your purification only one male lamb as your repayment offering, a special gift to the Lord for the priest. You shall bring only two pounds of flour mixed with olive oil for a grain offering and half a pint of olive oil. You shall also bring two doves or two pigeons, one for the sin offering and one for the burnt offering. On the eighth day of your purification you shall bring them to the priest at the entrance of the Tent. The priest shall take the lamb and the olive oil and present them as a special gift to the Lord for the priest. He shall kill the lamb and take some of the blood and put it on the lobe of your right ear, on the thumb of your right hand, and on the big toe of your right foot. The priest shall pour some of the oil into the palm of his own left hand and with a finger of his right hand sprinkle some of it seven times there in the Lord's presence. He shall put some of the oil on the same places he put the blood: on the lobe of your right ear, on the thumb of your right hand, and on the big toe of your right foot. The rest of the oil that is in his palm he shall put on your head and in this way perform the ritual of purification. Then he shall offer one of the doves or pigeons as the sin offering and the other as the burnt offering with the grain offering. In this way the priest shall perform the ritual of purification. This is the law for those who have a dreaded skin disease but who cannot afford the normal offerings required for his purification. The Lord gave Moses and Aaron the following regulations about houses affected by spreading mildew. (These were to apply after the people of Israel entered the land of Canaan, which the Lord was going to give them as their possession.) If any of you find that the Lord has sent mildew on your house, then you must go and tell the priest about it. The priest shall order everything to be moved out of the house before he goes to examine the mildew; otherwise everything in the house will be declared unclean. Then he shall go to the house and examine the mildew. If there are greenish or reddish spots that appear to be eating into the wall, he shall leave the house and lock it up for seven days. On the seventh day he shall return and examine it again. If the mildew has spread, he shall order that the stones on which the mildew is found be removed and thrown into some unclean place outside the city. After that he must have all the interior walls scraped and the plaster dumped in an unclean place outside the city. Then other stones are to be used to replace the stones that were removed, and new plaster will be used to cover the walls. If the mildew breaks out again in the house after the stones have been removed and the house has been scraped and plastered, the priest shall go and look. If it has spread, the house is unclean. It must be torn down, and its stones, its wood, and all its plaster must be carried out of the city to an unclean place. Any who enter the house while it is locked up will be unclean until evening. Any who lie down or eat in the house must wash their clothes. If, when the priest comes to look, the mildew has not reappeared after the house has been replastered, he shall pronounce the house ritually clean, because the mildew has been completely removed. To purify the house, he shall take two birds, some cedar wood, a red cord, and a sprig of hyssop. He shall kill one of the birds over a clay bowl containing fresh spring water. Then he shall take the cedar wood, the hyssop, the red cord, and the live bird and shall dip them in the blood of the bird that was killed and in the fresh water. And he shall sprinkle the house seven times. In this way he shall purify the house with the bird's blood, the fresh water, the live bird, the cedar wood, the hyssop, and the red cord. Then he shall let the live bird fly away outside the city over the open fields. In this way he shall perform the ritual of purification for the house, and it will be ritually clean. These are the laws about dreaded skin diseases; sores, boils, or inflammations; and about mildew in clothes or houses. These laws determine when something is unclean and when it is clean.

  • Leviticus 14:35 (GW) The owner of that house must come and tell the priest that there is something that looks like mildew in his house.

  • Leviticus 14:35 (HNV) then he who owns the house shall come and tell the Kohen, saying, 'There seems to me to be some sort of plague in the house.'

  • Leviticus 14:35 (JUB) the one that owns the house shall come and tell the priest, saying, Something like unto a plague has appeared in my house.

  • Leviticus 14:35 (KJV) And he that owneth the house shall come and tell the priest, saying , It seemeth to me there is as it were a plague in the house:

  • Leviticus 14:35 (KJVA) And he that owneth the house shall come and tell the priest, saying , It seemeth to me there is as it were a plague in the house:

  • Leviticus 14:35 (LEB) then the one who {owns the house} shall come and tell the priest, saying, 'It appears to me [that] an infection [is] in the house.'

  • Leviticus 14:35 (MSG) the householder is to go and tell the priest, 'I have some kind of fungus in my house.'

  • Leviticus 14:35 (NAS) then the one who owns the house shall come and tell the priest, saying, 'Something like a mark of leprosy has become visible to me in the house.'

  • Leviticus 14:35 (NCV) the owner of that house must come and tell the priest. He should say, 'I have seen something like mildew in my house.'

  • Leviticus 14:35 (NIRV) Then the owner of that house must go and speak to the priest. He must say, 'I've seen something that looks like mold in my house.'

  • Leviticus 14:35 (NIV) the owner of the house must go and tell the priest, 'I have seen something that looks like mildew in my house.'

  • Leviticus 14:35 (NKJV) and he who owns the house comes and tells the priest, saying, 'It seems to me that there is some plague in the house,'

  • Leviticus 14:35 (NLT) The owner of such a house must then go to the priest and say, 'It looks like my house has some kind of disease.'

  • Leviticus 14:35 (NRS) the owner of the house shall come and tell the priest, saying, "There seems to me to be some sort of disease in my house."

  • Leviticus 14:35 (NRSA) the owner of the house shall come and tell the priest, saying, "There seems to me to be some sort of disease in my house."

  • Leviticus 14:35 (RHE) He whose house it is, shall go and tell the priest, saying: It seemeth to me, that there is the plague of leprosy in my house,

  • Leviticus 14:35 (RSV) then he who owns the house shall come and tell the priest, 'There seems to me to be some sort of disease in my house.'

  • Leviticus 14:35 (RSVA) then he who owns the house shall come and tell the priest, 'There seems to me to be some sort of disease in my house.'

  • Leviticus 14:35 (TMB) and he that owneth the house shall come and tell the priest, saying, `It seemeth to me there is, as it were, a plague in the house,'

  • Leviticus 14:35 (TMBA) and he that owneth the house shall come and tell the priest, saying, `It seemeth to me there is, as it were, a plague in the house,'

  • Leviticus 14:35 (TNIV) the owner of the house must go and tell the priest, 'I have seen something that looks like a defiling mold in my house.'

  • Leviticus 14:35 (TYN) let him that oweth the house go ad tell the preast saynge, me thinke that there is as it were a leprosy in the housse.

  • Leviticus 14:35 (WBT) And he that owneth the house shall come and tell the priest, saying, it seemeth to me [there is] as it were a plague in the house:

  • Leviticus 14:35 (WEB) then he who owns the house shall come and tell the priest, saying, 'There seems to me to be some sort of plague in the house.'

  • Leviticus 14:35 (WYC) he shall go, whose the house (it) is, and shall tell to the priest, and shall say, It seemeth to me, that as it were a wound of leprosy is in mine house. (he shall go, whose house it is, and shall say to the priest, It seemeth to me, that a plague of leprosy is in my house.)

  • Leviticus 14:35 (YLT) then hath he whose the house [is] come in and declared to the priest, saying, As a plague hath appeared to me in the house;

Commentaries For Leviticus 14

  • Chapter 14

    Of declaring the leper to be clean. (1-9) The sacrifices to be offered by him. (10-32) The leprosy in a house. (33-53) Summary of the law concerning leprosy. (54-57)

    Verses 1-9 The priests could not cleanse the lepers; but when the Lord removed the plague, various rules were to be observed in admitting them again to the ordinances of God, and the society of his people. They represent many duties and exercises of truly repenting sinners, and the duties of ministers respecting them. If we apply this to the spiritual leprosy of sin, it intimates that when we withdraw from those who walk disorderly, we must not count them as enemies, but admonish them as brethren. And also that when God by his grace has brought to repentance, they ought with tenderness and joy, and sincere affection, to be received again. Care should always be taken that sinners may not be encouraged, nor penitents discouraged. If it were found that the leprosy was healed, the priest must declare it with the particular solemnities here described. The two birds, one killed, and the other dipped in the blood of the bird that was killed, and then let loose, may signify Christ shedding his blood for sinners, and rising and ascending into heaven. The priest having pronounced the leper clean from the disease, he must make himself clean from all remains of it. Thus those who have comfort of the remission of their sins, must with care and caution cleanse themselves from sins; for every one that has this hope in him, will be concerned to purify himself.

    Verses 10-32 The cleansed leper was to be presented to the Lord, with his offerings. When God has restored us to enjoy public worship again, after sickness, distance, or otherwise, we should testify our thanksgiving by our diligent use of the liberty. And both we and our offerings must be presented before the Lord, by the Priest that made us clean, even our Lord Jesus. Beside the usual rites of the trespass-offering, some of the blood, and some of the oil, was to be put upon him that was to be cleansed. Wherever the blood of Christ is applied for justification, the oil of the Spirit is applied for sanctification; these two cannot be separated. We have here the gracious provision the law made for poor lepers. The poor are as welcome to God's altar as the rich. But though a meaner sacrifice was accepted from the poor, yet the same ceremony was used for the rich; their souls are as precious, and Christ and his gospel are the same to both. Even for the poor one lamb was necessary. No sinner could be saved, had it not been for the Lamb that was slain, and hath redeemed us to God with his blood.

    Verses 33-53 The leprosy in a house is unaccountable to us, as well as the leprosy in a garment; but now sin, where that reigns in a house, is a plague there, as it is in a heart. Masters of families should be aware, and afraid of the first appearance of sin in their families, and put it away, whatever it is. If the leprosy is got into the house, the infected part must be taken out. If it remain in the house, the whole must be pulled down. The owner had better be without a dwelling, than live in one that was infected. The leprosy of sin ruins families and churches. Thus sin is so interwoven with the human body, that it must be taken down by death.

    Verses 54-57 When that God who is rich in mercy, for his great love wherewith he loved us, even when we were dead in sins, hath quickened us by his grace, ( ephesians 2:4 ephesians 2:5 ) , we shall manifest the change by repenting, and forsaking former sins. Let us follow after holiness, and let us compassionate other poor lepers, and desire, seek, and pray for their cleansing.

  • CHAPTER 14

    Leviticus 14:1-57 . THE RITES AND SACRIFICES IN CLEANSING OF THE LEPER.

    2, 3. law of the leper in the day of his cleansing--Though quite convalescent, a leper was not allowed to return to society immediately and at his own will. The malignant character of his disease rendered the greatest precautions necessary to his re-admission among the people. One of the priests most skilled in the diagnostics of disease [GROTIUS], being deputed to attend such outcasts, the restored leper appeared before this official, and when after examination a certificate of health was given, the ceremonies here described were forthwith observed outside the camp.

    4. two birds--literally, "sparrows." The Septuagint, however, renders the expression "little birds"; and it is evident that it is to be taken in this generic sense from their being specified as "clean"--a condition which would have been altogether superfluous to mention in reference to sparrows. In all the offerings prescribed in the law, Moses ordered only common and accessible birds; and hence we may presume that he points here to such birds as sparrows or pigeons, as in the desert it might have been very difficult to procure wild birds alive.
    cedar-wood, and scarlet, and hyssop--The cedar here meant was certainly not the famous tree of Lebanon, and it is generally supposed to have been the juniper, as several varieties of that shrub are found growing abundantly in the clefts and crevices of the Sinaitic mountains. A stick of this shrub was bound to a bunch of hyssop by a scarlet ribbon, and the living bird was to be so attached to it, that when they dipped the branches in the water, the tail of the bird might also be moistened, but not the head nor the wings, that it might not be impeded in its flight when let loose.

    5-9. the priest shall command that one of the birds be killed . . . over running water--As the blood of a single bird would not have been sufficient to immerse the body of another bird, it was mingled with spring water to increase the quantity necessary for the appointed sprinklings, which were to be repeated seven times, denoting a complete purification. (See 2 Kings 5:10 , Psalms 51:2 , Matthew 8:4 , Luke 5:14 ). The living bird being then set free, in token of the leper's release from quarantine, the priest pronounced him clean; and this official declaration was made with all solemnity, in order that the mind of the leper might be duly impressed with a sense of the divine goodness, and that others might be satisfied they might safely hold intercourse with him. Several other purifications had to be gone through during a series of seven days, and the whole process had to be repeated on the seventh, ere he was allowed to re-enter the camp. The circumstance of a priest being employed seems to imply that instruction suitable to the newly recovered leper would be given, and that the symbolical ceremonies used in the process of cleansing leprosy would be explained. How far they were then understood we cannot tell. But we can trace some instructive analogies between the leprosy and the disease of sin, and between the rites observed in the process of cleansing leprosy and the provisions of the Gospel. The chief of these analogies is that as it was only when a leper exhibited a certain change of state that orders were given by the priest for a sacrifice, so a sinner must be in the exercise of faith and penitence ere the benefits of the gospel remedy can be enjoyed by him. The slain bird and the bird let loose are supposed to typify, the one the death, and the other the resurrection of Christ; while the sprinklings on him that had been leprous typified the requirements which led a believer to cleanse himself from all filthiness of the flesh and spirit, and to perfect his holiness in the fear of the Lord.

    10-20. on the eighth day he shall take two he lambs without blemish, and one ewe-lamb of the first year without blemish--The purification of the leper was not completed till at the end of seven days, after the ceremonial of the birds [ Leviticus 14:4-7 ] and during which, though permitted to come into the camp, he had to tarry abroad out of his tent [ Leviticus 14:8 ], from which he came daily to appear at the door of the tabernacle with the offerings required. He was presented before the Lord by the priest that made him clean. And hence it has always been reckoned among pious people the first duty of a patient newly restored from a long and dangerous sickness to repair to the church to offer his thanksgiving, where his body and soul, in order to be an acceptable offering, must be presented by our great Priest, whose blood alone makes any clean. The offering was to consist of two lambs, the one was to be a sin offering, and an ephah of fine flour (two pints equals one-tenth), and one log (half pint) of oil ( Leviticus 2:1 ). One of the lambs was for a trespass offering, which was necessary from the inherent sin of his nature or from his defilement of the camp by his leprosy previous to his expulsion; and it is remarkable that the blood of the trespass offering was applied exactly in the same particular manner to the extremities of the restored leper, as that of the ram in the consecration of the priests [ Leviticus 8:23 ]. The parts sprinkled with this blood were then anointed with oil--a ceremony which is supposed to have borne this spiritual import: that while the blood was a token of forgiveness, the oil was an emblem of healing--as the blood of Christ justifies, the influence of the Spirit sanctifies. Of the other two lambs the one was to be a sin offering and the other a burnt offering, which had also the character of a thank offering for God's mercy in his restoration. And this was considered to make atonement "for him"; that is, it removed that ceremonial pollution which had excluded him from the enjoyment of religious ordinances, just as the atonement of Christ restores all who are cleansed through faith in His sacrifice to the privileges of the children of God.

    21-32. if he be poor, and cannot get so much; then he shall take one lamb--a kind and considerate provision for an extension of the privilege to lepers of the poorer class. The blood of their smaller offering was to be applied in the same process of purification and they were as publicly and completely cleansed as those who brought a costlier offering ( Acts 10:34 ).

    34-48. leprosy in a house--This law was prospective, not to come into operation till the settlement of the Israelites in Canaan. The words, "I put the leprosy," has led many to think that this plague was a judicial infliction from heaven for the sins of the owner; while others do not regard it in this light, it being common in Scripture to represent God as doing that which He only permits in His providence to be done. Assuming it to have been a natural disease, a new difficulty arises as to whether we are to consider that the house had become infected by the contagion of leprous occupiers; or that the leprosy was in the house itself. It is evident that the latter was the true state of the case, from the furniture being removed out of it on the first suspicion of disease on the walls. Some have supposed that the name of leprosy was analogically applied to it by the Hebrews, as we speak of cancer in trees when they exhibit corrosive effects similar to what the disease so named produces on the human body; while others have pronounced it a mural efflorescence or species of mildew on the wall apt to be produced in very damp situations, and which was followed by effects so injurious to health as well as to the stability of a house, particularly in warm countries, as to demand the attention of a legislator. Moses enjoined the priests to follow the same course and during the same period of time for ascertaining the true character of this disease as in human leprosy. If found leprous, the infected parts were to be removed. If afterwards there appeared a risk of the contagion spreading, the house was to be destroyed altogether and the materials removed to a distance. The stones were probably rough, unhewn stones, built up without cement in the manner now frequently used in fences and plastered over, or else laid in mortar. The oldest examples of architecture are of this character. The very same thing has to be done still with houses infected with mural salt. The stones covered with the nitrous incrustation must be removed, and if the infected wall is suffered to remain, it must be plastered all over anew.

    48-57. the priest shall pronounce the house clean, because the plague is healed--The precautions here described show that there is great danger in warm countries from the house leprosy, which was likely to be increased by the smallness and rude architecture of the houses in the early ages of the Israelitish history. As a house could not contract any impurity in the sight of God, the "atonement" which the priest was to make for it must either have a reference to the sins of its occupants or to the ceremonial process appointed for its purification, the very same as that observed for a leprous person. This solemn declaration that it was "clean," as well as the offering made on the occasion, was admirably calculated to make known the fact, to remove apprehension from the public mind, as well as relieve the owner from the aching suspicion of dwelling in an infected house.