Compare Translations for Leviticus 23:24

  • Leviticus 23:24 (ASV) Speak unto the children of Israel, saying, In the seventh month, on the first day of the month, shall be a solemn rest unto you, a memorial of blowing of trumpets, a holy convocation.

  • Leviticus 23:24 (BBE) Say to the children of Israel, In the seventh month, on the first day of the month, let there be a special day of rest for you, a day of memory, marked by the blowing of horns, a meeting for worship.

  • Leviticus 23:24 (CEB) Say to the Israelites: On the first day of the seventh month, you will have a special rest, a holy occasion marked by a trumpet signal.

  • Leviticus 23:24 (CEBA) Say to the Israelites: On the first day of the seventh month, you will have a special rest, a holy occasion marked by a trumpet signal.

  • Leviticus 23:24 (CJB) "Tell the people of Isra'el, 'In the seventh month, the first of the month is to be for you a day of complete rest for remembering, a holy convocation announced with blasts on the shofar.

  • Leviticus 23:24 (CSB) "Tell the Israelites: In the seventh month, on the first [day] of the month, you are to have a day of complete rest, commemoration and jubilation-a sacred assembly.

  • Leviticus 23:24 (DBY) Speak unto the children of Israel, saying, In the seventh month, on the first of the month, shall ye have a rest, a memorial of blowing of trumpets, a holy convocation.

  • Leviticus 23:24 (ESV) "Speak to the people of Israel, saying, In the seventh month, on the first day of the month, you shall observe a day of solemn rest, a memorial proclaimed with blast of trumpets, a holy convocation.

  • Leviticus 23 (GNT) The Lord gave Moses the following regulations for the religious festivals, when the people of Israel are to gather for worship. You have six days in which to do your work, but remember that the seventh day, the Sabbath, is a day of rest. On that day do not work, but gather for worship. The Sabbath belongs to the Lord, no matter where you live. Proclaim the following festivals at the appointed times The Passover, celebrated to honor the Lord, begins at sunset on the fourteenth day of the first month. On the fifteenth day the Festival of Unleavened Bread begins, and for seven days you must not eat any bread made with yeast. On the first of these days you shall gather for worship and do none of your daily work. Offer your food offerings to the Lord for seven days. On the seventh day you shall again gather for worship, but you shall do none of your daily work. When you come into the land that the Lord is giving you and you harvest your grain, take the first sheaf to the priest. He shall present it as a special offering to the Lord, so that you may be accepted. The priest shall present it the day after the Sabbath. On the day you present the offering of grain, also sacrifice as a burnt offering a one-year-old male lamb that has no defects. With it you shall present four pounds of flour mixed with olive oil as a food offering. The odor of this offering is pleasing to the Lord. You shall also present with it an offering of one quart of wine. Do not eat any of the new grain, whether raw, roasted, or baked into bread, until you have brought this offering to God. This regulation is to be observed by all your descendants for all time to come Count seven full weeks from the day after the Sabbath on which you bring your sheaf of grain to present to the Lord. On the fiftieth day, the day after the seventh Sabbath, present to the Lord another new offering of grain. Each family is to bring two loaves of bread and present them to the Lord as a special gift. Each loaf shall be made of four pounds of flour baked with yeast and shall be presented to the Lord as an offering of the first grain to be harvested. And with the bread the community is to present seven one-year-old lambs, one bull, and two rams, none of which may have any defects. They shall be offered as a burnt offering to the Lord, along with a grain offering and a wine offering. The odor of this offering is pleasing to the Lord. Also offer one male goat as a sin offering and two one-year-old male lambs as a fellowship offering The priest shall present the bread with the two lambs as a special gift to the Lord for the priests. These offerings are holy. On that day do none of your daily work, but gather for worship. Your descendants are to observe this regulation for all time to come, no matter where they live When you harvest your fields, do not cut the grain at the edges of the fields, and do not go back to cut the heads of grain that were left; leave them for poor people and foreigners. The Lord is your God. On the first day of the seventh month observe a special day of rest, and come together for worship when the trumpets sound. Present a food offering to the Lord and do none of your daily work. The tenth day of the seventh month is the day when the annual ritual is to be performed to take away the sins of the people. On that day do not eat anything at all; come together for worship, and present a food offering to the Lord. Do no work on that day, because it is the day for performing the ritual to take away sin. Any who eat anything on that day will no longer be considered God's people. And if any do any work on that day, the Lord himself will put them to death. This regulation applies to all your descendants, no matter where they live. From sunset on the ninth day of the month to sunset on the tenth observe this day as a special day of rest, during which nothing may be eaten. The Festival of Shelters begins on the fifteenth day of the seventh month and continues for seven days. On the first of these days come together for worship and do none of your daily work. Each day for seven days you shall present a food offering. On the eighth day come together again for worship and present a food offering. It is a day for worship, and you shall do no work (These are the religious festivals on which you honor the Lord by gathering together for worship and presenting food offerings, burnt offerings, grain offerings, sacrifices, and wine offerings, as required day by day. These festivals are in addition to the regular Sabbaths, and these offerings are in addition to your regular gifts, your offerings as fulfillment of vows, and your freewill offerings that you give to the Lord. When you have harvested your fields, celebrate this festival for seven days, beginning on the fifteenth day of the seventh month. The first day shall be a special day of rest. On that day take some of the best fruit from your trees, take palm branches and limbs from leafy trees, and begin a religious festival to honor the Lord your God. Celebrate it for seven days. This regulation is to be kept by your descendants for all time to come. All the people of Israel shall live in shelters for seven days, so that your descendants may know that the Lord made the people of Israel live in simple shelters when he led them out of Egypt. He is the Lord your God. So in this way Moses gave the people of Israel the regulations for observing the religious festivals to honor the Lord.

  • Leviticus 23 (GNTA) The Lord gave Moses the following regulations for the religious festivals, when the people of Israel are to gather for worship. You have six days in which to do your work, but remember that the seventh day, the Sabbath, is a day of rest. On that day do not work, but gather for worship. The Sabbath belongs to the Lord, no matter where you live. Proclaim the following festivals at the appointed times The Passover, celebrated to honor the Lord, begins at sunset on the fourteenth day of the first month. On the fifteenth day the Festival of Unleavened Bread begins, and for seven days you must not eat any bread made with yeast. On the first of these days you shall gather for worship and do none of your daily work. Offer your food offerings to the Lord for seven days. On the seventh day you shall again gather for worship, but you shall do none of your daily work. When you come into the land that the Lord is giving you and you harvest your grain, take the first sheaf to the priest. He shall present it as a special offering to the Lord, so that you may be accepted. The priest shall present it the day after the Sabbath. On the day you present the offering of grain, also sacrifice as a burnt offering a one-year-old male lamb that has no defects. With it you shall present four pounds of flour mixed with olive oil as a food offering. The odor of this offering is pleasing to the Lord. You shall also present with it an offering of one quart of wine. Do not eat any of the new grain, whether raw, roasted, or baked into bread, until you have brought this offering to God. This regulation is to be observed by all your descendants for all time to come Count seven full weeks from the day after the Sabbath on which you bring your sheaf of grain to present to the Lord. On the fiftieth day, the day after the seventh Sabbath, present to the Lord another new offering of grain. Each family is to bring two loaves of bread and present them to the Lord as a special gift. Each loaf shall be made of four pounds of flour baked with yeast and shall be presented to the Lord as an offering of the first grain to be harvested. And with the bread the community is to present seven one-year-old lambs, one bull, and two rams, none of which may have any defects. They shall be offered as a burnt offering to the Lord, along with a grain offering and a wine offering. The odor of this offering is pleasing to the Lord. Also offer one male goat as a sin offering and two one-year-old male lambs as a fellowship offering The priest shall present the bread with the two lambs as a special gift to the Lord for the priests. These offerings are holy. On that day do none of your daily work, but gather for worship. Your descendants are to observe this regulation for all time to come, no matter where they live When you harvest your fields, do not cut the grain at the edges of the fields, and do not go back to cut the heads of grain that were left; leave them for poor people and foreigners. The Lord is your God. On the first day of the seventh month observe a special day of rest, and come together for worship when the trumpets sound. Present a food offering to the Lord and do none of your daily work. The tenth day of the seventh month is the day when the annual ritual is to be performed to take away the sins of the people. On that day do not eat anything at all; come together for worship, and present a food offering to the Lord. Do no work on that day, because it is the day for performing the ritual to take away sin. Any who eat anything on that day will no longer be considered God's people. And if any do any work on that day, the Lord himself will put them to death. This regulation applies to all your descendants, no matter where they live. From sunset on the ninth day of the month to sunset on the tenth observe this day as a special day of rest, during which nothing may be eaten. The Festival of Shelters begins on the fifteenth day of the seventh month and continues for seven days. On the first of these days come together for worship and do none of your daily work. Each day for seven days you shall present a food offering. On the eighth day come together again for worship and present a food offering. It is a day for worship, and you shall do no work (These are the religious festivals on which you honor the Lord by gathering together for worship and presenting food offerings, burnt offerings, grain offerings, sacrifices, and wine offerings, as required day by day. These festivals are in addition to the regular Sabbaths, and these offerings are in addition to your regular gifts, your offerings as fulfillment of vows, and your freewill offerings that you give to the Lord. When you have harvested your fields, celebrate this festival for seven days, beginning on the fifteenth day of the seventh month. The first day shall be a special day of rest. On that day take some of the best fruit from your trees, take palm branches and limbs from leafy trees, and begin a religious festival to honor the Lord your God. Celebrate it for seven days. This regulation is to be kept by your descendants for all time to come. All the people of Israel shall live in shelters for seven days, so that your descendants may know that the Lord made the people of Israel live in simple shelters when he led them out of Egypt. He is the Lord your God. So in this way Moses gave the people of Israel the regulations for observing the religious festivals to honor the Lord.

  • Leviticus 23:24 (GW) "Tell the Israelites: On the first day of the seventh month hold a worship festival. It will be a memorial day, a holy assembly announced by the blowing of rams' horns.

  • Leviticus 23:24 (HNV) Speak to the children of Yisra'el, saying, In the seventh month, on the first day of the month, shall be a solemn rest to you, a memorial of blowing of trumpets, a holy convocation.

  • Leviticus 23:24 (JUB) Speak unto the sons of Israel, saying, In the seventh month in the first <em>day</em> of the month, ye shall have a rest, an alarm for a reminder, and a holy convocation.

  • Leviticus 23:24 (KJV) Speak unto the children of Israel, saying , In the seventh month, in the first day of the month, shall ye have a sabbath, a memorial of blowing of trumpets, an holy convocation.

  • Leviticus 23:24 (KJVA) Speak unto the children of Israel, saying , In the seventh month, in the first day of the month, shall ye have a sabbath, a memorial of blowing of trumpets, an holy convocation.

  • Leviticus 23:24 (LEB) "Speak to the {Israelites}, saying, 'In the seventh month, on [the] first [day] of the month, {you must have} a rest period, a remembrance of [the trumpet] blast, a holy assembly.

  • Leviticus 23:24 (MSG) "Tell the People of Israel, On the first day of the seventh month, set aside a day of rest, a sacred assembly - mark it with loud blasts on the ram's horn.

  • Leviticus 23:24 (NAS) "Speak to the sons of Israel, saying, 'In the seventh month on the first of the month you shall have a rest, a reminder by blowing of trumpets, a holy convocation.

  • Leviticus 23:24 (NCV) "Tell the people of Israel: 'On the first day of the seventh month you must have a special day of rest, a holy meeting, when you blow the trumpet for a special time of remembering.

  • Leviticus 23:24 (NIRV) "Say to the people of Israel, 'On the first day of the seventh month you must have a day of rest. It must be a special service that is announced with trumpet blasts.

  • Leviticus 23:24 (NIV) "Say to the Israelites: 'On the first day of the seventh month you are to have a day of rest, a sacred assembly commemorated with trumpet blasts.

  • Leviticus 23:24 (NKJV) "Speak to the children of Israel, saying: 'In the seventh month, on the first day of the month, you shall have a sabbath-rest, a memorial of blowing of trumpets, a holy convocation.

  • Leviticus 23:24 (NLT) to give these instructions to the Israelites: "On the appointed day in early autumn, you are to celebrate a day of complete rest. All your work must stop on that day. You will call the people to a sacred assembly -- the Festival of Trumpets -- with loud blasts from a trumpet.

  • Leviticus 23:24 (NRS) Speak to the people of Israel, saying: In the seventh month, on the first day of the month, you shall observe a day of complete rest, a holy convocation commemorated with trumpet blasts.

  • Leviticus 23:24 (NRSA) Speak to the people of Israel, saying: In the seventh month, on the first day of the month, you shall observe a day of complete rest, a holy convocation commemorated with trumpet blasts.

  • Leviticus 23:24 (RHE) Say to the children of Israel: The seventh month, on the first day of the month, you shall keep a sabbath, a memorial, with the sound of trumpets, and it shall be called holy.

  • Leviticus 23:24 (RSV) "Say to the people of Israel, In the seventh month, on the first day of the month, you shall observe a day of solemn rest, a memorial proclaimed with blast of trumpets, a holy convocation.

  • Leviticus 23:24 (RSVA) "Say to the people of Israel, In the seventh month, on the first day of the month, you shall observe a day of solemn rest, a memorial proclaimed with blast of trumpets, a holy convocation.

  • Leviticus 23:24 (TMB) "Speak unto the children of Israel, saying, `In the seventh month, on the first day of the month, shall ye have a sabbath, a memorial of blowing of trumpets, a holy convocation.

  • Leviticus 23:24 (TMBA) "Speak unto the children of Israel, saying, `In the seventh month, on the first day of the month, shall ye have a sabbath, a memorial of blowing of trumpets, a holy convocation.

  • Leviticus 23:24 (TNIV) "Say to the Israelites: 'On the first day of the seventh month you are to have a day of sabbath rest, a sacred assembly commemorated with trumpet blasts.

  • Leviticus 23:24 (TYN) speake vnto the childern of Israel ad saye. The first daye of the suenth moneth shalbe a rest of remembraunce vnto you, to blowe hornes in an holy feast it shalbe,

  • Leviticus 23:24 (WBT) Speak to the children of Israel, saying, In the seventh month, in the first [day] of the month, shall ye have a sabbath, a memorial of blowing of trumpets, a holy convocation.

  • Leviticus 23:24 (WEB) Speak to the children of Israel, saying, In the seventh month, on the first day of the month, shall be a solemn rest to you, a memorial of blowing of trumpets, a holy convocation.

  • Leviticus 23:24 (WYC) Speak thou to the sons of Israel, In the seventh month, in the first day of the month, shall be [a] sabbath, (a) memorial to you, sounding with trumps, and it shall be called holy; (Say thou to the Israelites, In the seventh month, on the first day of the month, shall be a sabbath day of rest for you, and there shall be a holy gathering, with the sounding of trumpets;)

  • Leviticus 23:24 (YLT) `Speak unto the sons of Israel, saying, In the seventh month, on the first of the month, ye have a sabbath, a memorial of shouting, a holy convocation;

Commentaries For Leviticus 23

  • Chapter 23

    The feasts of the Lord, The Sabbath. (1-3) The Passover, The offering of first-fruits. (4-14) The feast of Pentecost. (15-22) The feast of Trumpets, The day of atonement. (23-32) The feast of Tabernacles. (33-44)

    Verses 1-3 In this chapter we have the institution of holy times; many of which have been mentioned before. Though the yearly feasts were made more remarkable by general attendance at the sanctuary, yet these must not be observed more than the sabbath. On that day they must withdraw from all business of the world. It is a sabbath of rest, typifying spiritual rest from sin, and rest in God. God's sabbaths are to be religiously observed in every private house, by every family apart, as well as by families together, in holy assemblies. The sabbath of the Lord in our dwellings will be their beauty, strength, and safety; it will sanctify, build up, and glorify them.

    Verses 4-14 The feast of the Passover was to continue seven days; not idle days, spent in sport, as many that are called Christians spend their holy-days. Offerings were made to the Lord at his altar; and the people were taught to employ their time in prayer, and praise, and godly meditation. The sheaf of first-fruits was typical of the Lord Jesus, who is risen from the dead as the First-fruits of them that slept. Our Lord Jesus rose from the dead on the very day that the first-fruits were offered. We are taught by this law to honour the Lord with our substance, and with the first-fruits of all our increase, Pr. 3:9 . They were not to eat of their new corn, till God's part was offered to him out of it; and we must always begin with God: begin every day with him, begin every meal with him, begin every affair and business with him; seek first the kingdom of God.

    Verses 15-22 The feast of Weeks was held in remembrance of the giving of the law, fifty days after the departure from Egypt; and looked forward to the outpouring of the Holy Ghost, fifty days after Christ our Passover was sacrificed for us. On that day the apostles presented the first-fruits of the Christian church to God. To the institution of the feast of Pentecost, is added a repetition of that law, by which they were required to leave the gleanings of their fields. Those who are truly sensible of the mercy they received from God, will show mercy to the poor without grudging.

    Verses 23-32 the blowing of trumpets represented the preaching of the gospel, by which men are called to repent of sin, and to accept the salvation of Christ, which was signified by the day of atonement. Also it invited to rejoice in God, and become strangers and pilgrims on earth, which was denoted by the feast of Tabernacles, observed in the same month. At the beginning of the year, they were called by this sound of trumpet to shake off spiritual drowsiness, to search and try their ways, and to amend them. The day of atonement was the ninth day after this; thus they were awakened to prepare for that day, by sincere and serious repentance, that it might indeed be to them a day of atonement. The humbling of our souls for sin, and the making our peace with God, is work that requires the whole man, and the closest application of mind. On that day God spake peace to his people, and to his saints; therefore they must lay aside all their wordly business, that they might the more clearly hear that voice of joy and gladness.

    Verses 33-44 In the feast of Tabernacles there was a remembrance of their dwelling in tents, or booths, in the wilderness, as well as their fathers dwelling in tents in Canaan; to remind them of their origin and their deliverance. Christ's tabernacling on earth in human nature, might also be prefigured. And it represents the believer's life on earth: a stranger and pilgrim here below, his home and heart are above with his Saviour. They would the more value the comforts and conveniences of their own houses, when they had been seven days dwelling in the booths. It is good for those who have ease and plenty, sometimes to learn what it is to endure hardness. The joy of harvest ought to be improved for the furtherance of our joy in God. The earth is the Lord's, and the fullness thereof; therefore whatever we have the comfort of, he must have the glory of, especially when any mercy is perfected. God appointed these feasts, "Beside the sabbaths and your free-will offerings." Calls to extraordinary services will not excuse from constant and stated ones.

  • CHAPTER 23

    Leviticus 23:1-4 . OF SUNDRY FEASTS.

    2. Speak unto the children of Israel, . . . concerning the feasts of the Lord--literally, "the times of assembling, or solemnities" ( Isaiah 33:20 ); and this is a preferable rendering, applicable to all sacred seasons mentioned in this chapter, even the day of atonement, which was observed as a fast. They were appointed by the direct authority of God and announced by a public proclamation, which is called "the joyful sound" ( Psalms 89:15 ). Those "holy convocations" were evidences of divine wisdom, and eminently subservient to the maintenance and diffusion of religious knowledge and piety.

    3. Six days shall work be done: but the seventh day is the sabbath of to it, and it was to be "a holy convocation," observed by families "in their dwellings"; where practicable, by the people repairing to the door of the tabernacle; at later periods, by meeting in the schools of the prophets, and in synagogues.

    4. These are the feasts of the Lord, which ye shall proclaim in their seasons--Their observance took place in the parts of the year corresponding to our March, May, and September. Divine wisdom was manifested in fixing them at those periods; in winter, when the days were short and the roads broken up, a long journey was impracticable; while in summer the harvest and vintage gave busy employment in the fields. Besides, another reason for the choice of those seasons probably was to counteract the influence of Egyptian associations and habits. And God appointed more sacred festivals for the Israelites in the month of September than the people of Egypt had in honor of their idols. These institutions, however, were for the most part prospective, the observance being not binding on the Israelites during their wanderings in the wilderness, while the regular celebration was not to commence till their settlement in Canaan.

    Leviticus 23:5-8 . THE PASSOVER.

    5. the Lord's passover--(See Exodus 12:2 Exodus 12:14 Exodus 12:18 ) The institution of the passover was intended to be a perpetual memorial of the circumstances attending the redemption of the Israelites, while it had a typical reference to a greater redemption to be effected for God's spiritual people. On the first and last days of this feast, the people were forbidden to work [ Leviticus 23:7 Leviticus 23:8 ]; but while on the Sabbath they were not to do any work, on feast days they were permitted to dress meat--and hence the prohibition is restricted to "no servile work." At the same time, those two days were devoted to "holy convocation"--special seasons of social devotion. In addition to the ordinary sacrifices of every day, there were to be "offerings by fire" on the altar (see Numbers 28:19 ), while unleavened bread was to be eaten in families all the seven days (see 1 Corinthians 5:8 ).

    Leviticus 23:9-14 . THE SHEAF OF FIRST FRUITS.

    10. ye shall bring a sheaf of the first-fruits of your harvest unto the priest--A sheaf, literally, an omer, of the first-fruits of the barley harvest. The barley being sooner ripe than the other grains, the reaping of it formed the commencement of the general harvest season. The offering described in this passage was made on the sixteenth of the first month, the day following the first Passover Sabbath, which was on the fifteenth (corresponding to the beginning of our April); but it was reaped after sunset on the previous evening by persons deputed to go with sickles and obtain samples from different fields. These, being laid together in a sheaf or loose bundle, were brought to the court of the temple, where the grain was winnowed, parched, and bruised in a mortar. Then, after some incense had been sprinkled on it, the priest waved the sheaf aloft before the Lord towards the four different points of the compass, took a part of it and threw it into the fire of the altar--all the rest being reserved to himself. It was a proper and beautiful act, expressive of dependence on the God of nature and providence--common among all people, but more especially becoming the Israelites, who owed their land itself as well as all it produced to the divine bounty. The offering of the wave-sheaf sanctified the whole harvest ( Romans 11:16 ). At the same time, this feast had a typical character, and pre-intimated the resurrection of Christ ( 1 Corinthians 15:20 ), who rose from the dead on the very day the first-fruits were offered.

    Leviticus 23:15-22 . FEAST OF PENTECOST.

    15. ye shall count unto you from the morrow after the sabbath--that is, after the first day of the passover week, which was observed as a Sabbath.

    16. number fifty days--The forty-ninth day after the presentation of the first-fruits, or the fiftieth, including it, was the feast of Pentecost. (See also Exodus 23:16 , Deuteronomy 16:9 ).

    17. Ye shall bring out of your habitations two wave loaves of two tenth deals, &c.--These loaves were made of "fine" or wheaten flour, the quantity contained in them being somewhat more than ten pounds in weight. As the wave-sheaf gave the signal for the commencement, the two loaves solemnized the termination of the harvest season. They were the first-fruits of that season, being offered unto the Lord by the priest in name of the whole nation. (See Exodus 34:22 ). The loaves used at the Passover were unleavened; those presented at Pentecost were leavened--a difference which is thus accounted for, that the one was a memorial of the bread hastily prepared at their departure, while the other was a tribute of gratitude to God for their daily food, which was leavened.

    21. ye shall proclaim on the selfsame day, that it may be an holy convocation unto you: ye shall do no servile work therein--Though it extended over a week, the first day only was held as a Sabbath, both for the national offering of first-fruits and a memorial of the giving of the law.

    22. thou shalt not make clean riddance of the corners of thy field when thou reapest, The repetition of this law here probably arose from the priests reminding the people, at the presentation of the first-fruits, to unite piety to God with charity to the poor.

    Leviticus 23:23-25 . FEAST OF TRUMPETS.

    24. In the seventh month, in the first day of the month, shall ye have a sabbath--That was the first day of the ancient civil year.
    a memorial of blowing of trumpets--Jewish writers say that the trumpets were sounded thirty successive times, and the reason for the institution was for the double purpose of announcing the commencement of the new year, which was ( Leviticus 23:25 ) to be religiously observed (see Numbers 29:3 ), and of preparing the people for the approaching solemn feast.

    27-32. there shall be a day of atonement . . . and ye shall afflict your souls--an unusual festival, at which the sins of the whole year were expiated. (See Leviticus 16:29-34 ). It is here only stated that the severest penalty was incurred by the violation of this day.

    34-44. the feast of tabernacles, for seven days unto the Lord--This festival, which was instituted in grateful commemoration of the Israelites having securely dwelt in booths or tabernacles in the wilderness, was the third of the three great annual festivals, and, like the other two, it lasted a week. It began on the fifteenth day of the month, corresponding to the end of our September and beginning of October, which was observed as a Sabbath; and it could be celebrated only at the place of the sanctuary, offerings being made on the altar every day of its continuance. The Jews were commanded during the whole period of the festival to dwell in booths, which were erected on the flat roofs of houses, in the streets or fields; and the trees made use of are by some stated to be the citron, the palm, the myrtle, and the willow, while others maintain the people were allowed to take any trees they could obtain that were distinguished for verdure and fragrance. While the solid branches were reserved for the construction of the booths, the lighter branches were carried by men, who marched in triumphal procession, singing psalms and crying "Hosanna!" which signifies, "Save, we beseech thee!" ( Psalms 118:15 Psalms 118:25 Psalms 118:26 ). It was a season of great rejoicing. But the ceremony of drawing water from the pool, which was done on the last day, seems to have been the introduction of a later period ( John 7:37 ). That last day was the eighth, and, on account of the scene at Siloam, was called "the great day of the feast." The feast of ingathering, when the vintage was over, was celebrated also on that day [ Exodus 23:16 , 34:22 ], and, as the conclusion of one of the great festivals, it was kept as a sabbath.