Acts 18 MSG/NIV - Online Parallel Bible

 
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1 After Athens, Paul went to Corinth. 1 After this, Paul left Athens and went to Corinth.
2 That is where he discovered Aquila, a Jew born in Pontus, and his wife, Priscilla. They had just arrived from Italy, part of the general expulsion of Jews from Rome ordered by Claudius. 2 There he met a Jew named Aquila, a native of Pontus, who had recently come from Italy with his wife Priscilla, because Claudius had ordered all the Jews to leave Rome. Paul went to see them,
3 Paul moved in with them, and they worked together at their common trade of tentmaking. 3 and because he was a tentmaker as they were, he stayed and worked with them.
4 But every Sabbath he was at the meeting place, doing his best to convince both Jews and Greeks about Jesus. 4 Every Sabbath he reasoned in the synagogue, trying to persuade Jews and Greeks.
5 When Silas and Timothy arrived from Macedonia, Paul was able to give all his time to preaching and teaching, doing everything he could to persuade the Jews that Jesus was in fact God's Messiah. 5 When Silas and Timothy came from Macedonia, Paul devoted himself exclusively to preaching, testifying to the Jews that Jesus was the Christ.
6 But no such luck. All they did was argue contentiously and contradict him at every turn. Totally exasperated, Paul had finally had it with them and gave it up as a bad job. "Have it your way, then," he said. "You've made your bed; now lie in it. From now on I'm spending my time with the other nations." 6 But when the Jews opposed Paul and became abusive, he shook out his clothes in protest and said to them, "Your blood be on your own heads! I am clear of my responsibility. From now on I will go to the Gentiles."
7 He walked out and went to the home of Titius Justus, a God-fearing man who lived right next to the Jews' meeting place. 7 Then Paul left the synagogue and went next door to the house of Titius Justus, a worshiper of God.
8 But Paul's efforts with the Jews weren't a total loss, for Crispus, the meeting-place president, put his trust in the Master. His entire family believed with him. 8 Crispus, the synagogue ruler, and his entire household believed in the Lord; and many of the Corinthians who heard him believed and were baptized.
9 One night the Master spoke to Paul in a dream: "Keep it up, and don't let anyone intimidate or silence you. 9 One night the Lord spoke to Paul in a vision: "Do not be afraid; keep on speaking, do not be silent.
10 No matter what happens, I'm with you and no one is going to be able to hurt you. You have no idea how many people I have on my side in this city." 10 For I am with you, and no one is going to attack and harm you, because I have many people in this city."
11 That was all he needed to stick it out. He stayed another year and a half, faithfully teaching the Word of God to the Corinthians. 11 So Paul stayed for a year and a half, teaching them the word of God.
12 But when Gallio was governor of Achaia province, the Jews got up a campaign against Paul, hauled him into court, 12 While Gallio was proconsul of Achaia, the Jews made a united attack on Paul and brought him into court.
13 and filed chcrges: "This man is seducing people into acts of worship that are illegal." 13 "This man," they charged, "is persuading the people to worship God in ways contrary to the law."
14 Just as Paul was about to defend himself, Gallio interrupted and said to the Jews, "If this was a matter of criminal conduct, I would gladly hear you out. 14 Just as Paul was about to speak, Gallio said to the Jews, "If you Jews were making a complaint about some misdemeanor or serious crime, it would be reasonable for me to listen to you.
15 But it sounds to me like one more Jewish squabble, another of your endless hairsplitting quarrels over religion. Take care of it on your own time. I can't be bothered with this nonsense," 15 But since it involves questions about words and names and your own law--settle the matter yourselves. I will not be a judge of such things."
16 and he cleared them out of the courtroom. 16 So he had them ejected from the court.
17 Now the street rabble turned on Sosthenes, the new meeting-place president, and beat him up in plain sight of the court. Gallio didn't raise a finger. He could not have cared less. 17 Then they all turned on Sosthenes the synagogue ruler and beat him in front of the court. But Gallio showed no concern whatever.
18 Paul stayed a while longer in Corinth, but then it was time to take leave of his friends. Saying his good-byes, he sailed for Syria, Priscilla and Aquila with him. Before boarding the ship in the harbor town of Cenchrea, he had his head shaved as part of a vow he had taken. 18 Paul stayed on in Corinth for some time. Then he left the brothers and sailed for Syria, accompanied by Priscilla and Aquila. Before he sailed, he had his hair cut off at Cenchrea because of a vow he had taken.
19 They landed in Ephesus, where Priscilla and Aquila got off and stayed. Paul left the ship briefly to go to the meeting place and preach to the Jews. 19 They arrived at Ephesus, where Paul left Priscilla and Aquila. He himself went into the synagogue and reasoned with the Jews.
20 They wanted him to stay longer, but he said he couldn't. 20 When they asked him to spend more time with them, he declined.
21 But after saying good-bye, he promised, "I'll be back, God willing." 21 But as he left, he promised, "I will come back if it is God's will." Then he set sail from Ephesus.
22 he sailed to Caesarea. He greeted the assembly of Christians there, and then went on to Antioch, completing the journey. 22 When he landed at Caesarea, he went up and greeted the church and then went down to Antioch.
23 After spending a considerable time with the Antioch Christians, Paul set off again for Galatia and Phrygia, retracing his old tracks, one town after another, putting fresh heart into the disciples. 23 After spending some time in Antioch, Paul set out from there and traveled from place to place throughout the region of Galatia and Phrygia, strengthening all the disciples.
24 A man named Apollos came to Ephesus. He was a Jew, born in Alexandria, Egypt, and a terrific speaker, eloquent and powerful in his preaching of the Scriptures. 24 Meanwhile a Jew named Apollos, a native of Alexandria, came to Ephesus. He was a learned man, with a thorough knowledge of the Scriptures.
25 He was well-educated in the way of the Master and fiery in his enthusiasm. Apollos was accurate in everything he taught about Jesus up to a point, but he only went as far as the baptism of John. 25 He had been instructed in the way of the Lord, and he spoke with great fervor and taught about Jesus accurately, though he knew only the baptism of John.
26 He preached with power in the meeting place. When Priscilla and Aquila heard him, they took him aside and told him the rest of the story. 26 He began to speak boldly in the synagogue. When Priscilla and Aquila heard him, they invited him to their home and explained to him the way of God more adequately.
27 When Apollos decided to go on to Achaia province, his Ephesian friends gave their blessing and wrote a letter of recommendation for him, urging the disciples there to welcome him with open arms. The welcome paid off: Apollos turned out to be a great help to those who had become believers through God's immense generosity. 27 When Apollos wanted to go to Achaia, the brothers encouraged him and wrote to the disciples there to welcome him. On arriving, he was a great help to those who by grace had believed.
28 He was particularly effective in public debate with the Jews as he brought out proof after convincing proof from the Scriptures that Jesus was in fact God's Messiah. 28 For he vigorously refuted the Jews in public debate, proving from the Scriptures that Jesus was the Christ.