In the heyday of British rule it used to be said that the sun never set on the British Empire. Because the British flag consists of three crosses, superimposed one on another, the sun also never set on the cross!

The British Empire is gone, but it is still true that the sun never sets on the cross. The day begins on the island of Tonga in the Pacific near the International Date Line. There is a cross on the flag of Tonga, and so the first rays of the rising sun shine on the cross. Before the sun sets on Tonga, it has risen on New Zealand where there is a cross on the flag. Before the sun sets on New Zealand, it has risen on Australia where there is a cross on the flag. Before the day ends in Australia, a new day has begun on the islands of the Seychelles, and there also is a cross on the flag. Before the day ends there, it has begun in Africa where half a dozen nations have a cross on their flag. Before the day ends in Africa, a new day has begun in Europe where five nations have a cross on the flag. Before the day's ends in Europe, a new day has begun in North America where Canadian provinces from Newfoundland in the east to British Columbia in the west have flags with crosses. And before the day ends in British Columbia, it has begun in Hawaii where there is a cross on the flag. And by the time the day ends in Hawaii a new day has already begun on the island of Tonga. The sun never sets on the cross.