XXVIII

'' Yea, the sparrow hath found a hpuse, and the swallow a nest for herself, where she may lay her young, even Thine altars, 0 Lord of Hosts, my King, and my God."—Psalm lxxxiv. 3.

HE well-known saying of the saintly Rutherford, when he was silenced and exiled from his parish, echoes and expounds these words. "When I think," said he," upon the sparrows and swallows that build their nests in the kirk of Anwoth, and of my dumb Sabbaths, my sorrowful, bleared eyes look asquint upon Christ, and present Him as angry." So sighed the Presbyterian minister in his compelled idleness in a prosaic seventeenth century Scotch town, answering his heart's-brother away back in the faroff time, and in such different circumstances. The Psalmist was probably a member of the Levitical family of the Sons of Korah, who were "doorkeepers in the house of the Lord." He knew what he was saying when he preferred his humble office to all honours among the godless. He was shut out by some unknown circumstances from external participation in the tabernacle rites, and longs to be even as one of the swallows or sparrows that twitter and flit round the sacred courts. No doubt to him faith was much more inseparably attached to form than it should be for us. No doubt place and ritual were more to him than they can permissibly be to those who have heard and understood the great charter of spiritual worship spoken tirst to an outcast Samaritan of questionable character: "Neither in this mountain nor in Jerusalem shall men worship the Father." But equally it is true that what he wanted was what the outward worship brought him, rather than the worship itself. And the psalm, which begins with " longing" and "fainting" for the courts of the Lord, and pronouncing benedictions on " those that dwell in Thy house," works itself clear, if I might so say, and ends with "0 Lord of Hosts! Blessed is the man that trusteth in Thee "—for he shall "dwell in Thy house," wherever he is. So this flight of imagination in the words of my text may suggest to us two or three lessons.

I.—I take it first as pointing a bitter and significant contrast.

"The sparrow hath found a house, and the swallow a nest for herself," while I! We do not know what the Psalmist's circumstances were, but if we accept the conjecture that he may have accompanied David in his flight during Absalom's rebellion, we may fancy him as wandering on the uplands across Jordan, and sharing the agitations, fears, and sorrows of those dark hours, and in the midst of all, as the little company hurried hither and thither for safety, thinking, with a touch of bitter envy, of the calm restfulness and serene services of the peaceful tabernacle.

But, pathetic as is the complaint, when regarded as the sigh of a minister of the sanctuary exiled from the shrine which was as his home, and from the worship which was his occupation and delight, it sounds a deeper note and one which awakens echoes in our hearts, when we hear in it, as we may, the complaint of humanity contrasting its unrest with the happier lot of lower creatures. Do you remember who it was that said—and on what occasion He said it—" Foxes have holes, and birds of the air have roosting-places, but the Son of Man hath not where to lay His head "? That saying, like our text, has a narrower and a wider application. In the former it pathetically paints the homeless Christ, a wanderer in a land peculiarly "His own," and warns His enthusiastic would-be follower of the lot which he was so lightheartedly undertaking to share. But, when Jesus calls Himself Son of Man, He claims to be the realized ideal of humanity, and when, as in that saying, He contrasts the condition of " the Son of Man " with that of the animal creation, we can scarcely avoid giving to the words their wider application to the same contrast between man's homelessness and the creatures' repose which we have found in the Psalmist's sigh.

Yes! There is only one being in this world that does not fit the world that he is in, and that is man, chief and foremost of all. Other beings perfectly correspond to what we now call their "environment." Just as the soft mollusc fits every convolution of its shell, and the hard shell fits every curve of the soft mollusc, so every living thing corresponds to its place and its place to it, and with them all things go smoothly. But man, the crown of creation, is an exception to this else universal complete adaptation. "The earth, 0 Lord, is full of Thy mercy," but the only creature who sees and says that is the only one who has further to say, "I am a stranger on the earth." He and he alone is stung with restlessness and conscious of longings and needs which find no satisfaction here. That sense of homelessness may be an agony or a joy, a curse or a blessing, according to our interpretation of its meaning, and our way of stilling it. It is not a sign of inferiority, but of a higher destiny, that we alone should bear in our spirits the " blank misgivings" of those who, amid unsatisfying surroundings, have blind feelings after "worlds not realized," which elude our grasp. It is no advantage over us that every fly dancing in the treacherous gleams of an April sun, and every other creature on the earth except ourselves, on whom the crown is set, is perfectly proportioned to its place, and has desire and possessions absolutely conterminous.

"The Son of Alan hath not where to lay His head." Why must He alone wander homeless on the bleak moorland, whilst the sparrows and the swallows have their nests and their houses? Why? Because they are sparrows and swallows, and He is man, and "better than many sparrows." So let us lay to heart the sure promises, the blessed hopes, the stimulating exhortations, which come from that which, at first sight, seems to be a mystery and half an arraignment of the Divine wisdom, in the contrast between the restlessness of humanity and the reposeful contentment of those whom we call the lower creatures. Be true to the unrest, brother, and do not mistake its meaning, nor seek to still it, until it drives you to God.

II.—These words bring to us a plea which we mayuse, and a pledge on which we may rest.

"Thine altars, 0 Lord of hosts, my King and my God." The Psalmist pleads with God, and lays hold for his own confidence upon, the fact that creatures, who do not understand what the altar means, may build beside it, and those who have no notion of who the God is to whom the house is sacred, are yet cared for by Him. And he thinks to himself, " If I can say, 'My King and my God,' surely He that takes care of them will not leave me uncared for." The unrest of the soul that is capable of appropriating God is an unrest which has in it, if we understand it aright, the assurance that it shall be stilled and satisfied. He that is capable of entering into the close personal relationship with God which is expressed by that eloquent little pronoun and its reduplication with the two words, "King" and " God "—such a creature cannot cry for rest in vain, nor in vain grope, as a homeless wanderer, for the door of the Father's house.

"Doth God care for oxen; or saith He it altogether for our sakes?" "Consider the fowls of the air; your heavenly Father feedeth them." And the same argument which the Apostle used in the one of these sayings, and our Lord in the other, is valid and full of encouragement when applied to this matter. He that "satisfies the desires of every living thing," and fills full the maw of the lowest creature; and puts the worms into the gaping beak of the young ravens, when they cry; is not the King to turn a deaf ear, or the back of His hand, to the man who can appeal to Him with this word on his lips, " My King and my God." We grasp God when we say that; and all that we see of provident recognition and supply of wants in dealings with these lower creatures should encourage us to cherish calm unshakable confidence that every true desire of our souls after Him is as certain to be satisfied.

And so the glancing swallows around the eaves of the Temple and the twittering sparrows on its pinnacles may proclaim to us, not only the contrast, which is bitter, but the confidence, which is sweet. We may be sure that we shall not be left uncared for amongst the many pensioners at His table, and that the deeper our wants the surer we are of their supply. Our bodies may hunger in vain—bodily hunger has no tendency to bring meat; but our spirits cannot hunger in vain if they hunger after God; for that hunger is the sure precursor and infallible prophet of the coming satisfaction.

These words not only may hearten us with confidence that our desires will be satisfied if they are set upon Him, but they point us to the one way by which they come. Say "My King and my God" in the deepest recesses of a spirit conscious of His presence, of a will submitting to His authority, of emptiness expectant of His fulness ; say that, and you are in the house of the Lord. For it is not a question of place, it is a question of disposition and desire. And this Psalmist, though, when he began his song, he was far away from the Temple, and though he finished it sitting ou the same hillside on which he began it, when he had ended it was within the curtains of the sanctuary and wrapt about with the presence of his God. He had regained as he sang what for a moment he had lost the consciousness of when he began—viz., the presence of God with him on the lone, drearyexpanse of alien soil as truly as amidst the sanctities of what was called His house.

So, brethren, if we want rest, let us clasp God as ours; if we desire a house warm, safe, sheltered from every wind that blows, and inaccessible to enemies, let us, like the swallows, nestle under the eaves of the Temple. Let us take God for our hope. They that hold communion with Him—and we can all do that wherever we arc and whatever we may be doing— these, and only these, " dwell in the house of the Lord all the days of their lives." Therefore, with deepest simplicity of expression, our psalm goes on to describe, as equally recipients of blessedness, " those that dwell in the house of the Lord," and those in "whose heart are the ways" that lead to it, and to explain at last, as I have already pointed out, that both the dwellers in, and the pilgrims towards, that intimacy of abiding with God are included in the benediction showered on those who trust in Him, "Blessed is the man that trusteth in Thee."

III.—Lastly, we may take this picture of the Psalmist's as a warning.

Sparrows and swallows have very small brains. They build their nests, and they do not know whose altars they are flitting around. They pursue the insects on the wing, and they twitter their little songs; and they do not understand how all their busy, glancing, brief, trivial life is being lived beneath the shadow of the cherubim, and all but in the presence of the veiled God of the Shekinah.

There are plenty of people who live like that. We are all tempted to build our nests where we may lay our young, or dispose of ourselves or our treasures in the very sanctuary of God, with blind, crass indifference to the Presence in which we move. The Father's house has many mansions, and wherever we go we are in God's temple. Alas! some of us have no more sense of the sanctities around us, and no more consciousness of the Divine eye that looks down upon us, than if we were so many feathered sparrows flitting about the altar.

Let us take care, brethren, that we give our hearts to be influenced, and awed, and ennobled, and tranquillized by the sense of evermore being in the house of the Lord. Let us see to it that we keep in that house by continual aspiration, cherishing in our hearts the ways that lead to it; and so making all life worship, and every place, what the pilgrim found the stone of Bethel to be, a house of God and a gate of heaven. For everywhere, to the eye that sees the things that are, and not only the things that seem—and to the heart that feels the unseen presence of the one reality, God Himself—all places are temples, and all work may be beholding His beauty and inquiring in His sanctuary; and everywhere, though our heads rest upon a stone, and there be night and solitude around us, and doubt and darkness in front of us, and danger and terror behind us, and weakness within us, as was the case with Jacob, there will be the ladder with its foot at our side and its top in the heavens; and above the top His Face, which, when we see it look down upon us, makes all places and circumstances good and sweet.