Fifth Day

Fifth Day

WAITING ON GOD:
jfot Jnetruction.

'Shew me thy ways, O Lord 5
Teach me Thy paths.
Lead me in Thy truth, and teach me;
For Thou art the God of my salvation;
On Thee do I wait all the day.'—Ps. Ixt. 4, 6.

T SPOKE of an army on the point of entering
-*- an enemy's territories. Answering the
question as to the cause of delay: 'Waiting
for supplies.' The answer might also have
been: 'Waiting for instructions,' or, 'Waiting
for orders.' If the last despatch had not been
received, with the final orders of the com-
mander-in-chief, the army dared not move.
Even so in the Christian life: as deep as
the need of waiting for supplies, is that of
waiting for instructions.
See how beautiful this comes out in Pi. xxv.

The writer knew and loved God's law exceedingly, and meditated in that law day and night . Bat he knew that this was net enough. He knew that for the right spiritual apprehension of the truth, and fdr the rspht persona) application of it to his own peculiar circuns stances, he needed a direct divine teaching.'

The psalm has at all times been a very peculiar one, because of its reiterated expression of the felt need of the Divine teaching, and of the childlike confidence that that teaching1 would be given. ** Study the psalm until your heart is filled with the two thoughts—the absolute need, the absolute certainty of divine! guidance. And with these how entirely it is 'in this connection that he speaks,'On Thee do\ J wait all the day.' 'Waiting for guidance, waitting for instruction, all the day, is a very blessed! part of waiting upon God. j

The Father in heaven is so interested in Hi* ichild, and so longs to have his life at every* step in His will and His love, that He is willing to keep his guidance"entirely in His1 own hand. He knows so well that we are' unable to do what is really holy and heavenly, except as He works it in us, that He means His very demands to become promises of what He* will do, in watching over and leading us alI the

day. Not only in special difficulties and time* of perplexity, bnt in the common course of everyday life, we may count upon Him to teach us Hit way, and show us Hit path.

And what is needed in us to receive this guidancet jOne thing: waiting for instructions, waiting' on God.., / On Thee da I vail all tlie day.' We want in our times of prayer to give clear expression to our sense of need, and our faith in His help. We want definitely to become conscious of our ignorance as to what Ood's way may be, and the need of the Divine light shining within us, if our way is to be as of the sun, shining more and more unto the perfect day. And we Want to wait quietly before God in prayer,'until the deep, restful assurance fills us: It will be given—' the meek will He guide in the way.'

'On Thea do I wait all the day.' The speciaI surrender to the Divine guidance in our seasons oi prayer must cultivate, and be followed tip by, the habitual looking upwards'all the day.' As simple as it is, to one who has eyes, to walk all the da) in the light of the sun, so simple and delightful can it become to a soul practised in waiting or. God, to walk all the day in the enjoyment of God's light and leading. What is needed to help us to such a life is just one thing: the real knowledge and faith of God as the one only source of wisdom and goodness, as ever ready, and longing much to be to us all that we can possibly require—yes! this is the one thing we need. If we but saw our God in His love, if we but believed that He waits to be gracious, that He waits to be our life and to work all in us,—how this waiting on God would become our highest joy, the natural and spontaneous response of our hearts to His great love and glory!

'My soul, wait thou only upon God!'