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General Index

GENERAL INDEX

Abou Symbol, Greek inscription there,
21.

•' Absalom and Achitophel," 168.
•' Abt Vogler," 444.
'- Adonais," 416, 473, 498.
"All's Well That Ends Well," 182,195.
Anachronism, legitimate in poetry,
167.

'• Andrea del Sarto," 384.
Antiquity, not uncritical, 5.
"Antony and Cleopatra," 175, 181,195.
Aquinas, "Summa " of, 111.
"Arabian Nights, Recollections of,"
46a

Archilochus, and the tcytale, 23.
Aristotle, 17, 111. 163.
•'As You Like It," 182.
"Asolando,'' 443.
Atonement, in Homer, 50.
Augustine, 337.

Authorship of "Iliad" and "Odys-
sey ": evidences of, 7-13; not incon-
sistent with variations of style and
spirit, 12.

Bacon, Francis, 173,174, 420.
"Balaustion's Adventure," 429.
"Balin and Balan," 504.
Barrett, Elizabeth, 378, 408.
Bath-Kol, 366.

Beatrice, 109, 111, 116, 121, 145, 148.
"Becket," 482, 508.

Befreier, Der, epithet desired by
Goethe, 329.

"Bishop Blougram's Apology," 382.

"Blackwood's Magazine," 460.

"Break, Break, Break," 501.

'- Bringing the Good News from
Ghent," 382.

Browning, Robert: his poetry and his
theology, 375-447 ; occasion of essay
upon, 373-377; his portrait, 376; his
life till death of his wife, 377, 378;

his notoriety, 378; his range, 381-
384; his " Ring and the Book," 384-
387; possesses the faculty of ideal-
ization, 387-397; is he serious? 397.
398; are his writings healthful? 398-
400; as a literary artist, 400-412; his
optimism, 413-431; is an evolution-
ist, 418-421; believes in God, 421,
422; is a monist, 422-425; sees God
revealed in human personality, 425-
427; sees love of God in Christ, 427-
431; in a later aspect, 431-444; in-
fluence of his wife's death, 445; has
hopes for the bad, 446; his own
prospect, 446.

Brutes: have percepts, 161; have some
imagination, 161.

Byron, 335, 379, 458, 522.

Carlyle, Thomas, 13, 154, 291, 322, 376,
415.

"Charge of the Heavy Brigade," 495.
"Charge of the Light Brigade," 473.
ChoriztmU*, 5.

Christ: according to Goethe, 320, 321;
Browning's estimate of, 427; Lamb's
estimate of, 428; nature as the body
of, 428; nature as the face of, 42S,
429.

"Christmas Eve," 422, 424, 439, 442.
Christianity : Goethe's est! mate of, 321,

322; unconscious plagiarisms from,

369.

Coleridge: on "Withstanding," 254;
on the " Prelude," 339; his "^Eolian
Harp," 350; relations of, with Words-
worth, 351, 352; on an illusion of
memory, 354.

"Comedy, The Divine ": the monu-
ment of Beatrice, 111; Dante's pre-
paredness for writing, 111-114; the
intention of, 114-121; the poem de-
scribed, 121-150; Its cosmology, 122,
123; Its title explained, 124,125; its
lena rima, 125, 126; the Inferno de-
scribed, 126-136; the Purgatorlo de-
scribed, 136-144; the Paradlso de-
scribed, 144-150; conclusion of, 151-
154.

"Comus," 227.

"Confessions," 383.

Conscience: in Shakespeare's works,
203, 204; a witness against panthe-
ism, 367.

"Coriolanus," 181, 197, 199.

"Courtship, Lady Geroldine's," 408.

Critical theory of the Homeric poems:
its supporters, 5, 6; its opponents, 6,
7; reviewed, 7-13.

Cross, the, Goethe's view of, 322.

Curtis, G. W., on a change in his style,
13, 232.

"Cymbeline," 175, 182, 202, 215.

Dante and "The Divine Comedy":
considered, 105-155; how essay origi-
nated, 107,108.

Dante Alighieri: the time of his birth,
108, 109; relations to Beatrice, 109-
111; how qualified to be author of
"The Divine Comedy," 111-114; his
aim in his great work, 114-121; his
scheme of the universe, 122-124; as
a versifier, 124,126; his "Comedy"
described, 126-149; the most sensi-
tive of poets, 150: his ruling concep-
tion of heaven, 151, 152; his view of
salntshlp, 152-154; an intense realist,
154; the voice of all centuries, 154,
155; why his work will endure, 155.

"Daughter of the Voice, The," phrase
explained, 366.

Dead, The, in Homer, 56.

"Death in the Desert, A," 895, 431,438.

- Death of the Duke of Wellington,
Ode on," 473.

Deism: Upton upon, 337; isolates,337;
robs man, 337; makes nature a ma-
chine, 337; separates man and na-
ture, 337; in England, 415.

Descartes, his "Treatise on Method,"
339.

"Despair," Tennyson's, criticised, 518.
Dewey, on creative imagination as evi-
dence of unity of universe, 220. I

"Doloneia," The, its place in " Iliad,"
15.

"Dora," 458.

Dowden, on Shakespeare's productive
life, 177.

Dramatic literature: its genesis, St:
its characteristics, 164; Greek and
modern, 165.

"Duchess, My Lost," 382.

"Duty, Ode to": its place among
Wordsworth's poems, 366; its style,
366: not pantheistic, 366; its teach-
ings, 367.

"Easter Day," 442.
"Eclogues," 68.

Edwards, Jonathan: his views of
heaven and hell, 134,135; his " His-
tory of Redemption," 246.

Eliot, George: her double plots, 167:
scepticism in her works, 209; knows
the evangelical system, 292; exag-
gerates heredity, 391; on Tennyson's
plays, 483.

Emerson: on Goethe's "Elective Af-
finities," 296; on universality of
beauty, 338; on duty and ability, 390.

English tongue: influence of Bible on,
125; in Shakespeare's time, 172; Ba-
con on, 173.

Ennius: as predecessor of Virgil, 74;
deficient In art, 74; his "Annals,"
74; Virgil's use of, 76.

Epic, the: appeals to wonder, 10; a
kind of story-telling, 32; its con-
genial conditions, 32; a recreation,
35.

Epigraphy: Greek, 21-23: Latin, 24;
Hebrew, 24; Egyptian, 24; Baby-
lonian, 24 , 25.

"Epilogue, The," Browning's, 393.

"Epilogue to Dramatis Personue,'
Browning's, 428.

"Evelyn Hope," 384.

Evil: its place in descriptive litera-
ture, 389; its source, 435; good in,
435.

Evolution: according to Browning,

418; a criticism on, 514.
Rmg-weibliclie, das, discussed, 320.
"Excursion, The ": its length, 339;

its place in poet's plan, 339.

Falstafl, his deathbed, 210.

Fate, In Homer, 39.

"Faust": its place among poet's
works, 315; its features, 315-317; first
part of, 317 ; second part of, 318-320; a
criticism on second part of, 324, 325.

"Ferishtah's Fancies," 394, 397, 405,
434, 443.

Fichte, 338.

"Fireside, By the," of Browning, 384.

"Flight of the Duchess, The," Brown-
ing's, 384, 408.

Flint, on subjective tendency to pan-
theism, 198.

"Francis Turini," Browning's, 438.

Future life, Homer's views of, 56-59.

"Georgies," 79-81.

"Giaour, The," 380.

Gladstone, on Homeric question, 7.

God: as presented In Homer, 42,53,54;
his Immanence, 337.

Gods of Homer; characteristics of, 37,
38; inconsistently delineated, 88;
why unmoral, 46.

Goethe: on Homeric authorship, 6; his
references to his own poems, 19; a
dictum of, 129; "The Poet of Pan-
theism," 279-331; compared with
Luther, 281; parentage of, 283, 284;
characteristics of, 284-286; his habit
of falling in love, 287; his treatment
of his mother, 288; affair of, with
Frederike Brlon, 288; writes the
"Roman Elegies," 288; concubinage
of, 289, 304, 305; his treatment of
Kestner, 289; unpatriotic, 290; self-
confident, 290; letter of, to Lavater,
291; Influence on, of Fratileln von
Klcttenberg, 292, 293; his "Confes-
sions of a Beautiful Soul," 292; with-
draws from religious services, 294;
his •'GeneralbelclUe," 294; his "hea-
thenism," 295, 296; his Spinozlsm,
296,297; does not know true God, 298;
the character of his philosophy, 298,
299; his religion of health and Joy,
300; some truth in his philosophy,
300; an evolutionist, 301; loses hold
on ethical distinctions, 301; old age
of, 301,305; his view of sin and re-
pentance, 302; Tennyson's estimate

of, 302, 331; life of, at Weimar, 302,
303; spending a year in Italy, 304;
connection of, with Frau von Stein,
303,304; bereavements of, 306 ; moral
sense of, quickened, 306; reply of,
to Augusta von Stolberg, 306; letter
to Zelter, 307; his offer of marriage
declined, 307; visited by Thackeray,
307; death, 307; his " Gocte von Bor-
llcbingen," and criticisms thereof,
308; his " Sorrows of Werther," 309;
the second period of his literary life,
311-315; third period of his literary
life, 315; composes " Faust," 315,816-
320; views of Christ and Christianity,
321, 322; why influential, 325, 826:
style of, 326; relation of, to nature,
326,327; lyrics of, 327,328; his meth( Ki
of using Christian terminology, 320:
his influence on modern Action, 328;
how a Befreier, 329; how a political
liberator of Germany, 330; how an
enslaver ot Fatherland, 330; his defi-
nition of nature, 364.

"Goetz von Berlichingcn," 308, 309.

Grail, the Holy, legend of, 478,480,510,

eiL

"Grammarian's Funeral, The," 444.
Grote, on composition of "Iliad " and
"Odyssey," 6.

Hamilton, Sir W., 389, 483.

Hamlet, 159,168,181,194, 200-206.

"Hang-draw-and Quarterly," 460.

Heavens, the, of Dante, 123.

Hector, 9, 14,41, 47.

Hegel, 298, 416.

Hegenanism, its need, 392.

Helen: 41, 48, 60; marries Faust, 318.

Hell of Dante, 122, 137.

Hellanlcus, a Chorizont, 5.

"Henry IV.": mentioned 180; Parti.,

208, 213; Part II., 17(1,198.
"Henry V.": mention of, 179, 180, 204.

207, 210.

"Henry VI.": introduced, 178, 180;
Part I., 198; Part II., 195,201, 203-205,

208, 209; Part III., 189.
Heredity, limited, 509.
Hermes, 36, 38, 42.
Heslod, 79.

Historical plays or Shakespeare, 180.

"Hohenstiel-Schwangau," 419,421, 422.

Homer: how estimated, 3, 4; Arnold's
characterization of, 4 ; ancient criti-
cism of, 5; Wolf's theory regarding.
5; a host of destructive critics at-
tack, 6; conservative critics of, 6;
his claim to works that bear his name
defended, 7-17; how he discloses plot,
8-10; how he develops plot, 10, 11;
objections to sole authorship of, 12;
individual unity of each of the poems
of, 13-17: what follows denial of
unity of? 17,18; various versions of
poems of, how explained, 19: was
there a written language in time
of, 21-28; proof of unity of, not de-
pendent on existence of written
characters, 28-31; public apprecia-
tive of the works of, 31-33; ideas of,
about God, 35-14; doctrine of, con-
cerning sin, 44-19; his doctrine of
atonement, 50-55; his ideas of future
life, 55-59; exhibits human life, 59-
62; influence of, 62, 6i.

History and poetry compared, 163,164.

Hubris, 199.

Hutton: on realism, 162: on Goethe's
philosophy, 298 ; on Goethe's lyrics,
327.

"Iliad " : similar to " Odyssey " in dis-
closure and development of plot, 7-
11; differs from "Odyssey," 12, 13;
its unity, 13-16.

"Idylls of the King " : subject of, 477;
their story, 479-481.

Imagination: its place and function,
160-163; God's, 166; needful to sci-
ence and religion, 169: not fancy,
212; best poetical definition of, 361.

Immortality: in Homer, 55; Goethe's
mature views of, 306, 307.

"Intimations of Immortality ": dis-
cussion on, 853-360; its aim, 353; its
argument stated, 355; quotations
from, 356-360.

"Iphigenla," Goethe's, 313, 315.

Isaiah, differing style in, 232.

James, Henry, 388.

James First of England, his treatment

of an Arian, 262.
Jeffrey, on "The Excursion," 370.

Jesus, was he defective in humor? 397,
Jocularity discussed, 397, 398.
Jonson, Ben, 182,184.
"Julius Caesar," 197.

Kant, 338, 416.
"Karshish," 384.
"Kate, My," 408.

Klettenberg, Fraiilein von, 292, 293.
Klopstock, referred to, 282.

[ Lachmann, 6.
"Lady of Tripoli," 408.
Lanier, Sidney, on individual freedom,

425.

"Laus Veneris," of Swinburne, 176.
"Lear, King," 167,181,186,197,199. 205.
Light, Dante's vocabulary of, 151.
Limbo, 127.

"Locksley Hall," 465, 470-472.
"Locksley Hall, Sixty Years After,"
415, 516.

Love: its mediaeval classification, 139;
Milton's, 239; a means of insight,
360; its permanent prominence, 475,
476.

"Lucknow, The Defense of," 473.
Lucretius, influence of, on Virgil, 75.
Ludlow Castle, 276, 277.
"Lycldas," 473, 492.
Lync poetry, affected by aristocracies,
32.

Macaulay: memory of, 30; best point
in his essay on " Milton," 248.

"Macbeth": discussed, 171, 187, 190:
and "Richard III." compared, 191:
and Lady Macbeth compared, 192,
193.

Man: and nature united, 336; the in-
tegral, 360; explains all that leads
up to him, 419.

"Mariana," 460.

Marlowe, 173, 176,182.

"Martyr's Epitaph," 407.

"Mary, Queen." 482, 483.

"Measure for Measure," 182, 195, 202,
206, 208.

"Memoriam, In ": its nature and aim,
473, 474; its supreme value, 475, 476.

Memory, its retentiveness in ancient
and modern times, 29, 30.

"Memory, Ode to," 452, 453.

"Merchant of Venice," 180,196.

"Merry Wives of Windsor," 182.

"Midsummer Night's Dream," 168,217.

Mill, J. S., 335, 376, 399, 410.

"Miller's Daughter," 458.

Milton: general treatment of, 222-277;
influence of Civil War upon, 68; his
epitaph on Shakespeare, 223, 224;
elements in his style called "Mil-
tonic," 224; his education, 233, 234;
his part in the struggle for civil lib-
erty, 235-239; marriage of, and its
sequel, 239-242; his blindness, 242-
24B; the sphere introduced into
by "Paradise Lost," 246-250; its trag-
edy detailed, 250; reception of the
work of, by the public, 250-252; his
"Paradise Regained," its inception
and character, 252, 253; his didacti-
cism, 253, 254; scientific incorrect-
ness of and permanent popularity,
255, 256; his sense of form, 256; theo-
logical tenets of, 257-271; influenced
by Roger Williams, 271, 272; how
far tolerant in religion, 272, 273; in
what regard the poet of Protestant-
ism, 273-276.

Monism: of Milton, 263; non-ethical,
of Spinoza, 298; ethical, of Brown-
ing, 422-125.
- Monotheism, of Homer, 36.

-' Much Ado about Nothing," 182.

"Nativity, Ode on the Morning ol

Christ's," 68, 260.
Nature: according to Wordsworth,

364; according to Goethe, 364; its

best interpreters, 365; its relation to

God, 365.

Nemesis in " Richard III." and " Mac-
beth," 191,192.

"Not-self," earliest perception of,
what? 160.

Oak explains acorn. 419.

Odysseus, 11, 14, 37, 38, 42, 49, 56, 57, 62.

"Odyssey," see " Iliad."

"One Word More," Browning, 380.

Optimism: often a matter of temper-
ament, 414; Christian, 434; Pan-
theistic, 434.

Ostracism, 27.

■Othello," 181. 201.

P as a symbol, 138.

"Palace of Art, The," 504, 506-508.

Pantheism: has no method to restore
the /apsed, 318; fatal to Art, 325,

"Pantheism, The Hlgher,"488,489,499.

"Paradise Lost" and "Regained,"
see Milton.

Paradise, Dante's: consistent with
progress, 144: upward gravitation
in, 145; not a Mohammedan, 151.

"Parleyings, The," 443.

"Parsifal," carried in memory, 29.

Paul, Jean, 392.

"Pauline," of Browning, 377.

Peisistratus, 5, 6, 18,19, 28.

Penalty, its essence, 134, 506.

Pharaoh, hardening his heart, 49.

Phoenicia, 27.

"Pippa Passes," 392, 431.

Plato: his view of imagination, 160;
banishes poets from his Republic,
160; his theory of pre-existence,
353; cave of, 368.

Poet, the: expresses God's plan of
the universe, 166; presents the uni-
versal, 169; Wordsworth upon, 342:
"a maker," 379: described by
Browning, 379; not made by imagi-
nation alone, 388: idealizes, 388; is a
philosopher, 390: is not a fatalist,
390; has right views of God, 392; has
a moral aim, 455.

"Poet, The," of Tennyson, 454,455,460.

Poetry: depends on form, 73; more
valuable than history, 163, 164; re-
constructs, 164; as described by
Milton, 167 : and insanity, 168: Eng-
land's chief glory, 335; defined, 378,
379; imagination and facts in, 379;
creative, not a mere reproduction,
389; has an ideal and religious ele-
ment, 389-393; of the future, 412,413;
definition of, 459; essentials to the
greatest, 523.

Pope, criticised, 338.

Portia, excellence of her delineation,
196.

Pre-existence of souls, 353-359.
"Prelude, The," 338, 339, 361, 362.
"Primrose of the Rock, The," 359.
"Princess, The," 466-469, 498.

"Pro/undit, De," 485, 486, 489.

"Prometheus," 391, 392.

Propitiation, in Homer, 51.

Purgatory: difficulty of ascent to, 136;
has an ante-purgatory, 137,139; com-
pared with hell, 138, 139; classifica-
tion of sins in, 139; is a process, 142;
mistakes engendered by teaching
concerning, 143.

Puritan theology: tends to Deism,
337; its mistakes, 415.

Queensberry, Marquis of, an agnostic,

503.

"Rabbi ben Ezra." 42-1, 442.
Reason, its largest meaning, 360.
Religion, is knowledge, 484.
Reparation, the essence of tragedy,
391.

"Richard III.": its plot simple, 188;

its hero, Shakespeare's "villain,"

188,189; arrival of Nemesis in, 190.
Rimini, Franeesca di, 133.
"Ring and the Book, The," 379, 380,

384, 387, 403, 406, 418, 423, 421, 431, 434,

436, 442, 446.
"Root and Branch " party, 235.

Sacrifice, the heathen and Christian
idea of, 52, 54, 55.

"Sage, The Ancient," 488, 499.

"Salsiaz, La," 438, 443.

"Samson Agonlstes," 240, 241. 243.

"Saul," 393, 394, 395.

Schiller: on Weimar Society, 303; in-
fluence of, on Goethe, 303; his death,
305, 306.

Science, what? 162.

Seneca, "Ik Trtmquillitaie,'" 168.

Shakespeare: his universality, 157-
220; his largeness, 159, '160: ex-
pressed what was best of his age,
171-173; is yet a new force, 173, 174;
his education, 174: his adventurous
youth, 17.5-177; the period of his
productive activity divided, 177,17S;
"in the workshop," 178: "in the
"world," 178-181: "out of the
nepths," 181, 182: "on the heights"
182. 183: his self-forgetfulness, 181:

his concessions to popular taste, 185;
his universality considered, 186; the
universal element present in his
creation of characters, 187-212: is a
great ethical teacher, 193; his secu-
larly a limitation of his univer-
sality, 194; not agnostic or natural-
istic, 195; his view of the divine
nature, 196; his view of human
nature, 197-211; his references to
work of Christ, 208, 209; his teach-
ings pure and sound, 210; the uni-
versal in his imagery, 212-214; the
universal in his diction, 214-216; his
invention limited. 217; the poet par
excellence of secular humanity. 217-
220.

Shelley, 3, 338, 408, 416. 521.

Sin: in Homer, 44-51: Dante's classi-
fication of, 128-131; Dante's view of
nature and penalty of, 132-136;
Shakespeare's view of, 198-202 : Mil-
ton's view of, 265; Goethe's view of,
302; Browning's view of, 434-439;
Tennyson's view of, 504-509.

Sonnets: of Shakespeare, 184, 185,476;
of Milton, 244, 369; of Words-
worth, 369.

"Bordello," 402, 416.

"Sorrows of Werther," 309-311.

"Soul's Tragedy," 439.

"Spanish Cloister," 383.

Spinoza, 297, 298.

"Statue and the Bust, The," 384, 435.
"Strafford," 377.
Substitution, 51.

Suffering, how explained by Dante,
134.

Swinburne, 176, 376, 408, 414, 478, 479.
Taine, M., 171, 475.

Tennyson: 449-524; the promise of his
youth, 451-458; style of, 458-460; earli-
est publications of, 460. 461; some
characteristics of, 461-465; applies
the principle of divineorder, 465-469;
poet of the pure affections, 469-171;
his mistakes extenuated, 471-173;
the greatest work of his life, 473-476;
writes "The Idylls of the King,"
476-482 ; dramas of, 482, 483; the ag-
nostic cast of his poems accounted
for, 48,"r-185; inconsistent in use of
the words faith and knowledge,
485; his views of the derivation of
the soul, 486-189; not a pantheist,
489-493; believes in no personal ex-
istence before birth, 493-4% ; his con-
ception of nature, 496-502; fights ma-
terialism, 502; recognizes the abuse
of human freedom, 503; his pictures
of sin, 504-509; recognizes Christ as
deliverer, 509-514; the despondency
of his old age, 515-517; his two repre-
sentations of man's future destiny,
517-519; theology of, summed up, 519,
520; a religious guide, 521; wherein
a great poet, 521-523; his final hon-
ors, 523, 524.

GENERAL INDEX

Theology, a popular definition of, 36.

"Timonof Athens," 200,201.

"Tintern Abbey, Lines Written
Above." Wordsworth's eompletest
statement of relation between God
and nature, 360-362.

"Tintern Abbey," a system of thought
in verse, 363-365.

"Titus Andronicus," 186,196.

"Treatise of Christian Doctrine," Mil-
ton's, 257-274.

"Troilus and Cressida," 175,182,198.

"Twelfth Night," 197.

Twyn, his fate, 238.

Ulysses: referred to, 123; Shakes-
peare's portraiture of, 175.

Universality: key to unlock mystery
of Shakespeare, 186; its meaning,
186.

Universe, content of term, 380.

Vaughan, his metempsychosis, 354.

-' Venus and Adonis," 176,186.

Virgil: general treatment of, 65-103;
and Homer, 4; his presentation of
facts, 8; his age, 67-69; his birth and
education, 69-73; his devotion to the
Muse, 73-75; his characteristic* as a
writer, 75-77; his writings, 77; his

53i

"Eclogues," 77-79; his "Georgics,"
79-81; the" .Eneid," 81-83; his posi-
tion among ancient poets, 83-87;
some special excellencies of, 87-91;
is theologically in advance of Ho-
mer, 91-94 ; a prophet of Christianity,
94-97; send-off of his work, 97; in-
fluences the faiths of his country-
men, 97, 98; in the estimation of the
Middle Ages, 98-102; the motive and
subject of his song, 102; expresses
the hope of the Augustan Age, 103.

Voltaire, on purgatory. 138.

Vulpius, Christiane, 289, 304-306.

Watson, William, 371, 459.

Watts, G. F., a collection of his paint-
ings, 375.

"Where Claribel Low Lleth," 460.

"Wllhelm Meister," 293.

"Winter's Tale," 182.

Wolf, his Homeric theory, 5, 6, 16.

Wordsworth: in general, 333-372; in-
fluence of, on Mill, 335,336; the poet
of revival and revolution, 336-338;
his " Prelude," 338-341; why a rustic
poet, 341; awukes to his vocation,
342-314; deals with pre suppositions
of Christianity, 344-346; his sister
Dorothy, 346-349; his friend Cole-
ridge, 349-352; his three greatest
poems, 352, 353; his " Intimations of
Immortality," 353-359; not a pan-
theist, 359, 360; his "Lines Written
Above Tintern Abbey," 360-362; his
"Tintern Abbey," 363-365 ; his " Ode
to Duty," 36V368; possesses a Chris-
tian spirit, 368, 369; Is a great poet,
369, 370; tributes to his genius, 370-
372.

Xenon, a Chorizont, 5.

Zeus, 36-42.
Zola, 162, 388.

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