Luke 15:32

It was meet (edei). Imperfect tense. It expressed a necessity in the father's heart and in the joy of the return that justifies the feasting. Eupranqhnai is used again (first aorist passive infinitive) and carhnai (second aorist passive infinitive) is more than mere hilarity, deep-seated joy. The father repeats to the elder son the language of his heart used in verse Matthew 24 to his servants. A real father could do no less. One can well imagine how completely the Pharisees and scribes (verse Matthew 2 ) were put to silence by these three marvellous parables. The third does it with a graphic picture of their own attitude in the case of the surly elder brother. Luke was called a painter by the ancients. Certainly he has produced a graphic pen picture here of God's love for the lost that justifies forever the coming of Christ to the world to seek and to save the lost. It glorifies also soul-saving on the part of his followers who are willing to go with Jesus after the lost in city and country, in every land and of every race.