Try out the new BibleStudyTools.com. Click here!

Wink

WINK

wink (razam, literally, "to roll the eyes"):

The act or habit of winking was evidently considered to be evil both in its motives and in its results. The idea of its facetiousness, prevalent in our day, is nowhere apparent in the Scriptures. It is mentioned frequently, but is always associated with sin, in the Old Testament especially in the sense of conceit, pride, and rebellion against God: "Why doth thine heart carry thee away? and what do thy eyes wink at, that thou turnest thy spirit against God" (Job 15:12,13 the King James Version). So also Psalms 35:19: "Neither let them wink with the eye that hate roe without a cause." "A naughty person, a wicked man, walketh with froward mouth. He winketh with his eyes," etc. (Proverbs 6:12,13 the King James Version). "He that winketh with the eye causeth sorrow" (Proverbs 10:10). See Watkinson, Education of the Heart, "Ethics of Gesture," 194.

In the New Testament the word is used to express the longsuffering patience and forgiveness of God toward erring Israel:

"And the times of this ignorance God winked at" (Acts 17:30 the King James Version, hupereidon, "overlooked," and so translated in the Revised Version (British and American); compare The Wisdom of Solomon 11:23; Ecclesiasticus 30:11). The use of "winked" in this connection would in our day, of course, be considered in bad taste, if not actually irreverent, but it is an excellent example of the colloquialism of the King James Version.

Arthur Walwyn Evans


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography Information
Orr, James, M.A., D.D. General Editor. "Entry for 'WINK'". "International Standard Bible Encyclopedia". 1915.