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Wonder; Wonderful

WONDER; WONDERFUL

wun'-der, wun'-derful:

The verb "wonder" occurs only a few times in the Old Testament; "wonder" as noun is much more frequent, and is chiefly the translation of the word mopheth, a splendid or conspicuous work, a "miracle" (Exodus 4:21; 11:9, etc.), often conjoined with 'othoth, "signs" (Exodus 7:3; Deuteronomy 6:22; 13:1,2; 34:11; Nehemiah 9:10, etc.). Other frequent words are pala', pele', a "marvel," "miracle" (Exodus 3:20; 15:11; Joshua 3:5; Isaiah 9:6, margin "wonderful counselor," etc.). In the New Testament the ordinary verb is thaumazo, and the most frequent noun is teras, a "marvel," "portent," answering in its meaning to Hebrew pala'. As in the Old Testament the "wonder" is chiefly a miraculous work, so in the Gospels the feeling of wonder is chiefly drawn out by the marvelous displays of Christ's power and wisdom (Matthew 15:31; Mark 6:51; Luke 4:22, etc.).

Wonderful, that which excites or calls forth wonder, is in the Old Testament chiefly the translation of pala' or pele' (2 Samuel 1:26; Psalms 40:3; Isaiah 28:29, etc.); in the New Testament of thaumasios (once, Matthew 21:15).

For "wondered" in Luke 8:25; 11:14, the Revised Version (British and American) has "marvelled" (compare 9:43); in the Old Testament also "marvellous" frequently for "wondrous" etc. (1 Chronicles 16:9; ; Job 9:10; Psalms 96:3; 105:2).

W. L. Walker


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Bibliography Information
Orr, James, M.A., D.D. General Editor. "Entry for 'WONDER; WONDERFUL'". "International Standard Bible Encyclopedia". 1915.