Sermon V

"That ye might be filled with all the fulness of God."—Eph. iii, 19.

The Apostle's many-linked prayer, which we have been considering in successive sermons, has reached its height. It soars to the very Throne of God. There can be nothing above or beyond this wonderful petition. Rather, it might seem as if it were too much to ask, and as if, in the ecstasy of prayer, Paul had forgotten the limits that separate the creature from the Creator, as well as the experience of sinful and imperfect men, and had sought to "wind himself too high for mortal life beneath the sky." And yet Paul's prayers are God's promises ; and we are justified in taking these rapturous petitions as being distinct declarations of God's desire and purpose for each of us; as being the end which He had in view in the unspeakable gift of His Son ; and as being the certain outcome of His gracious working on all believing hearts.

It seems at first a paradoxical impossibility; looked at more deeply and carefully it becomes a possibility for each of us, and therefore a duty ; a certainty for all the redeemed in fullest measure hereafter; and, alas I a rebuke to our low lives and feeble expectations. Let us look, then, at the petition, with the desire of sounding, as we may, its depths and realising its preciousness.

I.—First of all, think with me of the significance of this prayer.

"The fulness of God" is another expression for the whole sum and aggregate of all the energies, powers, and attributes of the Divine nature, the total Godhead in its plenitude and abundance.

"God is love," we say. What does that mean, but that God desires to impart His whole self to the creatures whom He loves? What is love in its lofty and purest forms, even as we see them here on earth; what is love except the infinite longing to bestow one's self? And when we proclaim that which is the summit and climax of the revelation of our Father in the person of His Son, and say with the last utterances of Scripture that "God is love," we do in other words proclaim that the very nature and deepest desire and purpose of the Divine heart is to pour itself on the emptiness and need of His lowly creatures in floods that keep back nothing. Lofty, wonderful, incomprehensible to the mere understanding as this thought may be, clearly it is the inmost meaning of all that Scripture tells us about God as being the " portion of His people," and about us, as being by Christ and in Christ "heirs of God," and possessors of Himself.

We have, then, as the promise that gleams from these great words, this wonderful prospect, that the Divine love, truth, holiness, joy, in all their rich plenitude of all-sufficient abundance, may be showered upon us. The whole Godhead is our possession. For the fulness of God is no far-off remote treasure that lies beyond human grasp and outside of human experience. Do not we believe that, to use the words of this Apostle in another letter, "it pleased the Father that in Him should all the fulness dwell"? Do we not believe that, to use the words of the same Epistle, "In Christ dwelleth all the fulness of the Godhead bodily"? Is not that abundance of the resources of the whole Deity insphered and incarnated in Jesus Christ our Lord, that it may be near us, and that we may put out our hand and touch it? This may be a paradox for the understanding, full of metaphysical puzzles and cobwebs, but for the heart that knows Christ, most true and precious. God is gathered into Jesus Christ, and all the fulness of God, whatever that may mean, is embodied in the Man Christ Jesus, that from Him it may be communicated to every soul that will.

For, to quote other words of another of the New Testament teachers, "Of His fulness have all we received, and grace for grace." And to quote words in another part of the same Epistle, we may "all come to a perfect man, to the measure of the stature of the fulness of Christ." High above us, then, and inaccessible though that awful thought, "the fulness of God," may seem, as the zenith of the unscaleable heavens seems to us poor creatures creeping here npon the flat earth, it comes near, near, near, ever nearer, and at last tabernacles among us, when we think that in Him all the fulness dwells, and it comet) nearer yet and enters into our hearts when we think that " of His fulness have we all received."

Then, still further, observe another of the words in this petition :—" That ye may be filled." That is to say, Paul's prayer and God's purpose and desire concerning us is, that our whole being may be so saturated and charged with an indwelling Divinity as that there shall be no room in our present stature and capacity for more, and no sense of want or aching emptiness.

Ah ! brethren, when we think of how eagerly we have drunk at the stinking puddles of earth, and how after every draught there has yet been left a thirst that was pain, it is something for us to hear Him say :—" The water that I shall give him shall be in him a well of water springing up into everlasting life."—and "he that drinketh of this water shall never thirst." Our empty hearts, with their experiences of the insufficiency and the vanity of all earthly satisfaction, stand there like the water-pots at the rustic marriage, and the Master says, "Fill them to the brim." And then, by His touch, the water of our poor savourless, earthly enjoyments is transmuted and elevated into the new wine of His Kingdom. We may be filled, satisfied with the fulness of God.

There is another point as to the significance of this prayer, on which I must briefly touch. As our Revised Version will tell you, the literal rendering of my text is, "filled unto" (not exactly with} "all the fulness of God;" which suggests the idea not of a completed work but of a process, and of a growing process, as if more and more of that great fulness might pass into a man. Suppose a number of vessels, according to the old illustration about degrees of glory in Heaven; they are each full, but the quantity that one contains is much less than that which the other may hold. Add to the illustration that the vessels can grow, and that filling makes them grow; as a shrunken bladder when you pass gas into it will expand and round itself out, and all the creases will be smoothed away. Such is the Apostle's idea here that a process of filling goes on which may satisfy the then desires, because it fills us up to to the then capacities of our spirits ; but in the very process of so filling and satisfying, makes those spirits capable of containing larger measures of His fulness, which therefore flow into it. Such, as I take it, in rude and faint outline, is the significance of this great prayer.

II.—Now turn in the next place, to consider briefly the possibility of the accomplishments of this petition.

As I said, it sounds as if it were too much to desire.

Certainly no •wish can go beyond this wish. The question is, can a sane and humble wish go as far as this; and can a man pray such a prayer with any real belief that he will get it answered here and now? I say yes!

There are two difficulties that at once start up.

People will say, does such a prayer as this upon man's lips not forget the limits that bound the creature's capacity? Can the finite contain the Infinite?

Well, that is a verbal puzzle, and I answer, yes! The finite can contain the Infinite, if you are talking about two hearts that love, one of them God's and one of them mine. We have got to keep very clear and distinct before our minds the broad, firm line of demarcation between the creature and the Creator, or else we get into a pantheistic region where both creature and Creator expire. But there is a Christian as well as an atheistic pantheism, and as long as we retain clearly in our minds the consciousness of the personal distinction between God and His child, so as that the child can turn round and say, "I love Thee," and God can look down and say, "I bless thee;" then all identification and mutual indwelling and impartation from Him of Himself are possible, and are held forth as the aim and end of Christian life.

Of course in a mere abstract and philosophical sense the Infinite cannot be contained by the finite; and attributes which express infinity, like omnipresence and omniscience and omnipotence and so on, indicate things in God that we can know but little about, and that cannot be communicated. But those are not the Divinest things in God. "God is love." Do you believe that that saying unveils the deepest things in Him? God is light, " and in Him is no darkness at all." Do you believe that Hifi light and His love are nearer the centre than these attributes of power and infinitude? If we believe that, then we can come back to my text, and say, "The love, which is Thee, can come into me; the light, which is Thee, can pour itself into my darkness; the holiness, which is Thee, can enter into my impurity. The heaven of heavens cannot contain Thee. Thou dwellest in the humble and in the contrite heart."

So, dear brethren, the old legends about mighty forms that contracted their stature and bowed their Divine heads to enter into some poor man's hut, and sit there, are simple Christian realities. And instead of puzzling ourselves with metaphysical difficulties which are mere shadows, and the work of the understanding or the spawn of words, let us listen to the Christ when He says, "We will come into him and make our abode with him," and believe that it was no impossibility which fired the Apostle's hope when he prayed, and in praying prophesied, that we might be filled with all the fulness of God.

Then there is another difficulty that rises before our minds ; and Christian men say, "How is it possible, in this region of imperfection, compassed with infirmity and sin as we are, that such hopes should ba realised for us here." Well, I would rather answer that question by retorting and saying: "How is it possible that such a prayer should have come from inspired lips unless the thing that Paul was asking might be?" Did he waste his breath when he thus prayed? Are we not as Christian men bound, instead of measuring our expectations by our attainments, to try to stretch our attainments to what are our legitimate expectations, and to hear in these words the answer to the faithless and unbelieving doubt whether such a thing is possible, and the assurance that it is possible.

An impossibility can never be a duty, and yet we are commanded : "Be ye perfect, as your Father in Heaven is perfect." An impossibility can never be a duty, and yet we are commanded to let Christ abide in our hearts.

Oh! if we believed less in the power of onr sin it would have less power upon us. If we believed more in the power of an indwelling Christ He would have more power within ns. If we said to ourselves," It is possible," we should make it possible. The impossibility arises only from our own weakness, from our own sinful weakness ; and though it may be true, and is true, that none of us will live without sin as long as we abide here, it is also true that each moment of interruption of our communion with Christ, and therefore each moment of interruption of that being " filled with the fulness of God," might have been avoided. We know about every such time that we could have helped it if we had liked. And it is no use bringing any general principles about sin cleaving to men in order to break the force of that conviction. But if that conviction be a real one, and if whenever a Christian man loses the consciousness of God in his heart, making him blessed, he is obliged to say : " It was my own fault and Thou wouldst have stayed if I had chosen," then there follows from that, that it is possible, notwithstanding all the imperfection and sin of earth, that we may be "filled with all the fulness of God."

So, dear brethren, take you this prayer as the standard of your expectations ; and oh ! take it as we must all take it, as the sharpest of rebukes to our actual attainments in holiness and in likeness to our Master. Set by the side of these wondrous and solemn words.—" filled with the fulness of God," the facts of the lives of the average professing Christians of this generation, and of this congregation; their emptiness, their ignorance of the Divine indwelling, their want of anything in their experience that corresponds in the least degree to such words as these. Judge whether a man is not more likely to be bowed down in wholesome sense of his own sinfulness and tmworthiness, if he has before him such an ideal as this of my text, than if it, too, has faded out of his life. I believe, for my part, that one great cause of the worldliness and the sinfulness and mechanical formalism that are eating the life out of the Christianity of this generation, is the fact of the Church having largely lost any real belief in the possibility that Christian men may possess the fulness of God as their present experience. And so, when they do not find it in themselves they say : •' Oh 1 It is all right; it is the ncessary result of our imperfect fleshly condition." No ! It is all wrong; and His purpose is that we should possess Him in the fulness of His gladdening and hallowing power, at every moment in our happy lives.

III.—One word to close with, as to the means by which this prayer may be fulfilled.

Remember, it comes as the last link in a chain. I shall have wasted my breath for a month, as far as you are concerned, if you do not feel that the preceding links are needful before this can be attained.

But I only touch upon the nearer of them and remind you that it must be Christ dwelling in our hearts, that fills them with the fulness of God. Where He comes God comes. And where does He come? He comes where faith opens the door for Him. If you will trust Jesus Christ, if you will distrust your selves, if you will turn your thoughts and your hearts to Him, if you will let Him come into your souls, and not shut him out because your souls are so full that there is no room for Him there, then when He comes He will not come empty-handed, but will bring the full Godhead with Him.

There must be the emptying of self, if there is to be the filling with God. And the emptying of self is realised in that faith which forsakes self -confidence, self -righteousness self-dependence, self-control, self-pleasing, and yields itself wholly to the dear Lord.

There is another condition that is required, and that is the previous link in this braided chain. The conscious experience of the love which is in Christ will bring to us "the fulness of God." Love is power; love is God; and when we live in the sense and experience of God's love to us then we have the power and we have the God. It is as in some of these petrifying streams, the water is charged with particles which it deposits upon everything that is laid in its course. So, if we plunge our hearts into that fountain of the love of Christ, as it flows it will clothe us with all the Divine energies which are held in solution in the Divinest thing in God, His own love. Plunged into the love we are filled with the fulness.

Then keep near your Master. It all comes to that.

Meditate upon Him ; do not let days pass, as they do pass,

without a thought being turned to Him. Do not go about

your daily work without a remembrance of Him. Keep

yourselves in Christ. Seek to experience His love, that

love which passeth knowledge, and is only known by

them who possess it. And then, as the old painters with

deep truth used to paint the Apostle of Love with a face

Jike his Master, living near Christ and looking upon Him

yon will receive of His fulness, and "we all, with open

face, beholding the glory, shall be changed into the

glory."