Best Known Translations
Other Translations

1 John 2:19 DBY

19 They went out from among us, but they were not of us; for if they had been of us, they would have surely remained with us, but that they might be made manifest that none are of us.

Study tools for 1 John 2:19

  • a 2:1 - Teknia (a diminutive). It is a term of parental affection. It applies to Christians irrespective of growth. Used in vers. 12.28; chs. 3.7,18; 4.4; 5.21; John 13.33; Gal. 4.19
  • b 2:1 - Parakletos, as 'comforter,' John 14.16,26; 15.26; 16.7. Christ manages all our affairs for us above; the Holy Spirit below. I use 'patron' in the sense rather of the Roman patron, who maintained the interests of his clients in every way. So Christ on high; the Spirit here for saints.
  • c 2:5 - A subjunctive, or 'shall keep.'
  • d 2:7 - Or 'ye had.'
  • e 2:9 - 'The darkness.' Though a little harsh in these cases in English, 'the' ought to be retained, because it is not simply a state -- a man being in darkness; but a specific darkness, the ignorance and non-revelation of God is spoken of: only it is abstract, and so absolute. 'The darkness' is the natural condition of sinful man without God, who is light; the creature without God. Hence in John 1.5 'the light appears in darkness, and the darkness apprehended it not.' 'Is passing' (ver. 8) is abstract. 'The true light shines:' that is absolute; it shines, whether seen or not. But though some had received the light, he could not say the darkness was all gone, for it was not, but only with some who 'were once darkness, but now light in the Lord.' Thus it was not as in the gospel, when Christ was upon earth; for then the darkness apprehended not the light shining in darkness. It was putting the light out. As long as he was in the world, he was the light of the world. Now it was not so: there was a passing away of the darkness.
  • f 2:13 - Paidion (diminutive); it has reference to growth. It stands in contrast to 'young men' and 'fathers.'
  • g 2:14 - Ginosko: and so throughout chapter, except vers. 11,20,21,29 (first), oida. Perfect tense here: 'have come to know him, and continue so to do;' and so vers. 4,13,14.
  • h 2:14 - The perfect tense: the state produced continues.
  • i 2:17 - See Note e at ch. 3.10.
  • j 2:18 - Teknia (a diminutive). It is a term of parental affection. It applies to Christians irrespective of growth. Used in vers. 12.28; chs. 3.7,18; 4.4; 5.21; John 13.33; Gal. 4.19
  • k 2:18 - John uses 'hour' continually in the sense of 'time,' as John 5.35, 'a season.' It is properly a given point of time. With John it is constantly a period characterized by one thing, and hence looked at as only one time. As we say 'the hour of Napoleon's greatness.'
  • l 2:18 - 'There have come' (ginomai: John 1.17) is not from the same word as 'comes' in this verse. It is what did not exist before, but begins or becomes. 'There have come' I believe nearest the sense. The perfect tense conveys the thought that they still exist.
  • m 2:27 - Personal pronouns, used as the subject of a verb, are normally emphatic in Greek, but in John their use is almost universal. Still, there is some distinctive emphasis here, as also ver. 24, where 'you' seems in contrast with 'those that denied the Son.'
  • n 2:28 - 'If ' (so 3John 10) sets out what supposes and depends on the fact, not referring to time. Here, if at any moment it happened, we should be so and so: if that, this might be too.
  • o 2:29 - Here eidete from oida, conscious knowledge; then ginoskete from ginosko, knowledge of something from without, from witness to us.
  • p 2:29 - Or 'ye know.'