Glede

Glede [N] [S]

an Old English name for the common kite, mentioned only in Deuteronomy 14:13 (Heb. ra'ah), the Milvus ater or black kite. The Hebrew word does not occur in the parallel passage in ( Leviticus 11:14 , da'ah, rendered "vulture;" in RSV, "kite"). It was an unclean bird. The Hebrew name is from a root meaning "to see," "to look," thus designating a bird with a keen sight. The bird intended is probably the buzzard, of which there are three species found in Palestine. (See VULTURE .)

These dictionary topics are from
M.G. Easton M.A., D.D., Illustrated Bible Dictionary, Third Edition,
published by Thomas Nelson, 1897. Public Domain, copy freely.

[N] indicates this entry was also found in Nave's Topical Bible
[S] indicates this entry was also found in Smith's Bible Dictionary

Bibliography Information

Easton, Matthew George. "Entry for Glede". "Easton's Bible Dictionary". .

Glede, [N] [E]

the old name for the common kite (Milvus ater ), occurs only in ( 14:13 ) among the unclean birds of prey.


[N] indicates this entry was also found in Nave's Topical Bible
[E] indicates this entry was also found in Easton's Bible Dictionary

Bibliography Information

Smith, William, Dr. "Entry for 'Glede,'". "Smith's Bible Dictionary". . 1901.

GLEDE

gled (ra`ah; gups):

A member of the hawk species. It is given among the list of abominations in Deuteronomy 14:13, but not in the Le list (Leviticus 11:14). The kite is substituted. The Arabs might have called one of the buzzards the glede. In England, where specimens of most of these birds appear in migration, the glede is synonymous with kite, and was given the name from glide, to emphasize a gliding motion in flight. See illustration, p. 1235.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography Information
Orr, James, M.A., D.D. General Editor. "Entry for 'GLEDE'". "International Standard Bible Encyclopedia". 1915.