Compare Translations for 2 Samuel 1:1

2 Samuel 1:1 ASV
And it came to pass after the death of Saul, when David was returned from the slaughter of the Amalekites, and David had abode two days in Ziklag;
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2 Samuel 1:1 BBE
Now after the death of Saul, when David, having come back from the destruction of the Amalekites, had been in Ziklag for two days;
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2 Samuel 1:1 CEB
After Saul's death, when David had returned from defeating the Amalekites, he stayed in Ziklag two days.
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2 Samuel 1:1 CJB
Sha'ul had died, and David had been two days in Ziklag after returning from the slaughter of the 'Amaleki.
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2 Samuel 1:1 RHE
Now it came to pass, after Saul was dead, that David returned from the slaughter of the Amalecites, and abode two days in Siceleg.
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2 Samuel 1:1 ESV
After the death of Saul, when David had returned from striking down the Amalekites, David remained two days in Ziklag.
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2 Samuel 1:1 GW
After Saul died and David returned from defeating the Amalekites, David stayed in Ziklag two days.
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2 Samuel 1:1 GNT
After Saul's death David came back from his victory over the Amalekites and stayed in Ziklag for two days.
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2 Samuel 1:1 HNV
It happened after the death of Sha'ul, when David was returned from the slaughter of the `Amaleki, and David had abode two days in Tziklag;
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2 Samuel 1:1 CSB
After the death of Saul, David returned from defeating the Amalekites and stayed at Ziklag two days.
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2 Samuel 1:1 KJV
Now it came to pass after the death of Saul, when David was returned from the slaughter of the Amalekites, and David had abode two days in Ziklag;
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2 Samuel 1:1 LEB
{After} the death of Saul, David returned from defeating the Amalekites and he stayed at Ziklag two days.
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2 Samuel 1:1 NAS
Now it came about after the death of Saul, when David had returned from the slaughter of the Amalekites, that David remained two days in Ziklag.
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2 Samuel 1:1 NCV
Now Saul was dead. After David haddefeated the Amalekites, he returned to Ziklag and stayed there two days.
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2 Samuel 1:1 NIRV
After Saul died, David returned to Ziklag. He had won the battle over the Amalekites. He stayed in Ziklag for two days.
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2 Samuel 1:1 NIV
After the death of Saul, David returned from defeating the Amalekites and stayed in Ziklag two days.
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2 Samuel 1:1 NKJV
Now it came to pass after the death of Saul, when David had returned from the slaughter of the Amalekites, and David had stayed two days in Ziklag,
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2 Samuel 1:1 NLT
After the death of Saul, David returned from his victory over the Amalekites and spent two days in Ziklag.
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2 Samuel 1:1 NRS
After the death of Saul, when David had returned from defeating the Amalekites, David remained two days in Ziklag.
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2 Samuel 1:1 RSV
After the death of Saul, when David had returned from the slaughter of the Amal'ekites, David remained two days in Ziklag;
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2 Samuel 1:1 DBY
And it came to pass after the death of Saul, when David had returned from the slaughter of the Amalekites, that David abode two days in Ziklag.
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2 Samuel 1:1 MSG
Shortly after Saul died, David returned to Ziklag from his rout of the Amalekites.
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2 Samuel 1:1 WBT
Now it came to pass after the death of Saul, when David had returned from the slaughter of the Amalekites, and David had abode two days in Ziklag;
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2 Samuel 1:1 TMB
Now it came to pass after the death of Saul, when David had returned from the slaughter of the Amalekites, and David had stayed two days in Ziklag--
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2 Samuel 1:1 TNIV
After the death of Saul, David returned from striking down the Amalekites and stayed in Ziklag two days.
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2 Samuel 1:1 WEB
It happened after the death of Saul, when David was returned from the slaughter of the Amalekites, and David had abode two days in Ziklag;
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2 Samuel 1:1 WYC
And it was done, after that Saul was dead, that David turned again from the slaying of Amalek, and he dwelled two days in Ziklag. (And it was done, after Saul died, that David returned from the slaughter of the Amalekites, and he stayed in Ziklag for two days.)
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2 Samuel 1:1 YLT
And it cometh to pass, after the death of Saul, that David hath returned from smiting the Amalekite, and David dwelleth in Ziklag two days,
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2 Samuel 1 Commentary - Matthew Henry Commentary on the Whole Bible (Concise)

Chapter 1

This book is the history of the reign of king David. It relates his victories, the growth of the prosperity of Israel, and his reformation of the state of religion. With these events are recorded the grievous sins he committed, and the family as well as public troubles with which he was punished. We here meet with many things worthy of imitation, and many that are written for our warning. The history of king David is given in Scripture with much faithfulness, and from it he appears, to those who fairly balance his many virtues and excellent qualities against his faults, to have been a great and good man.

Tidings brought to David of the death of Saul. (1-10) The Amalekite is put to death. (11-16) David's lamentation for Saul and Jonathan. (17-27)

Verses 1-10 The blow which opened David's way to the throne was given about the time he had been sorely distressed. Those who commit their concerns to the Lord, will quietly abide his will. It shows that he desired not Saul's death, and he was not impatient to come to the throne.

Verses 11-16 David was sincere in his mourning for Saul; and all with him humbled themselves under the hand of God, laid so heavily upon Israel by this defeat. The man who brought the tidings, David put to death, as a murderer of his prince. David herein did not do unjustly; the Amalekite confessed the crime. If he did as he said, he deserved to die for treason; and his lying to David, if indeed it were a lie, proved, as sooner or later that sin will prove, lying against himself. Hereby David showed himself zealous for public justice, without regard to his own private interest.

Verses 17-27 Kasheth, or "the bow," probably was the title of this mournful, funeral song. David does not commend Saul for what he was not; and says nothing of his piety or goodness. Jonathan was a dutiful son, Saul an affectionate father, therefore dear to each other. David had reason to say, that Jonathan's love to him was wonderful. Next to the love between Christ and his people, that affection which springs form it, produces the strongest friendship. The trouble of the Lord's people, and triumphs of his enemies, will always grieve true believers, whatever advantages they may obtain by them.

2 Samuel 1 Commentary - Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

CHAPTER 1

2 Samuel 1:1-16 . AN AMALEKITE BRINGS TIDINGS OF SAUL'S DEATH.

1. David had abode two days in Ziklag--Though greatly reduced by the Amalekite incendiaries, that town was not so completely sacked and destroyed, but David and his six hundred followers, with their families, could still find some accommodation.

2-12. a man came out of the camp from Saul--As the narrative of Saul's death, given in the last chapter, is inspired, it must be considered the true account, and the Amalekite's story a fiction of his own, invented to ingratiate himself with David, the presumptive successor to the throne. David's question, "How went the matter?" evinces the deep interest he took in the war, an interest that sprang from feelings of high and generous patriotism, not from views of ambition. The Amalekite, however, judging him to be actuated by a selfish principle, fabricated a story improbable and inconsistent, which he thought would procure him a reward. Having probably witnessed the suicidal act of Saul, he thought of turning it to his own account, and suffered the penalty of his grievously mistaken calculation (compare 2 Samuel 1:9 with 1 Samuel 31:4 1 Samuel 31:5 ).

10. the crown--a small metallic cap or wreath, which encircled the temples, serving the purpose of a helmet, with a very small horn projecting in front, as the emblem of power.
the bracelet that was on his arm--the armlet worn above the elbow; an ancient mark of royal dignity. It is still worn by kings in some Eastern countries.

13-15. David said unto the young man . . . Whence art thou?--The man had at the outset stated who he was. But the question was now formally and judicially put. The punishment inflicted on the Amalekite may seem too severe, but the respect paid to kings in the West must not be regarded as the standard for that which the East may think due to royal station. David's reverence for Saul, as the Lord's anointed, was in his mind a principle on which he had faithfully acted on several occasions of great temptation. In present circumstances it was especially important that his principle should be publicly known; and to free himself from the imputation of being in any way accessory to the execrable crime of regicide was the part of a righteous judge, no less than of a good politician.

2 Samuel 1:17-27 . DAVID LAMENTS SAUL AND JONATHAN.

17, 18. David lamented with this lamentation--It has always been customary for Eastern people, on the death of great kings and warriors, to celebrate their qualities and deeds in funeral songs. This inimitable pathetic elegy is supposed by many writers to have become a national war song, and to have been taught to the young Israelites under the name of "The Bow," in conformity with the practice of Hebrew and many classical writers in giving titles to their songs from the principal theme ( Psalms 22:1 , 56:1 , 60:1 , 80:1 , 100:1 ). Although the words "the use of" are a supplement by our translators, they may be rightly introduced, for the natural sense of this parenthetical verse is, that David took immediate measures for instructing the people in the knowledge and practice of archery, their great inferiority to the enemy in this military arm having been the main cause of the late national disaster.

19. The beauty of Israel is slain upon thy high places--literally, "the gazelle" or "antelope of Israel." In Eastern countries, that animal is the chosen type of beauty and symmetrical elegance of form.
how are the mighty fallen!--This forms the chorus.

21. let there be no dew, neither let there be rain--To be deprived of the genial atmospheric influences which, in those anciently cultivated hills, seem to have reared plenty of first-fruits in the corn harvests, was specified as the greatest calamity the lacerated feelings of the poet could imagine. The curse seems still to lie upon them; for the mountains of Gilboa are naked and sterile.
the shield of the mighty is vilely cast away--To cast away the shield was counted a national disgrace. Yet, on that fatal battle of Gilboa, many of the Jewish soldiers, who had displayed unflinching valor in former battles, forgetful of their own reputation and their country's honor, threw away their shields and fled from the field. This dishonorable and cowardly conduct is alluded to with exquisitely touching pathos.

24-27. Ye daughters of Israel, weep over Saul, who clothed you in scarlet, with other delights, &c.--The fondness for dress, which anciently distinguished Oriental women, is their characteristic still. It appears in their love of bright, gay, and divers colors, in profuse display of ornaments, and in various other forms. The inmost depths of the poet's feeling are stirred, and his amiable disposition appears in the strong desire to celebrate the good qualities of Saul, as well as Jonathan. But the praises of the latter form the burden of the poem, which begins and ends with that excellent prince.