Compare Translations for Exodus 10:22

Exodus 10:22 ASV
And Moses stretched forth his hand toward heaven; and there was a thick darkness in all the land of Egypt three days;
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Exodus 10:22 BBE
And when Moses' hand was stretched out, dark night came over all the land of Egypt for three days;
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Exodus 10:22 CEB
So Moses raised his hand toward the sky, and an intense darkness fell on the whole land of Egypt for three days.
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Exodus 10:22 CJB
Moshe reached out his hand toward the sky, and there was a thick darkness in the entire land of Egypt for three days.
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Exodus 10:22 RHE
And Moses stretched forth his hand towards heaven: and there came horrible darkness in all the land of Egypt for three days.
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Exodus 10:22 ESV
So Moses stretched out his hand toward heaven, and there was pitch darkness in all the land of Egypt three days.
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Exodus 10:22 GW
Moses lifted his hand toward the sky, and throughout Egypt there was total darkness for three days.
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Exodus 10:22 GNT
Moses raised his hand toward the sky, and there was total darkness throughout Egypt for three days.
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Exodus 10:22 HNV
Moshe stretched forth his hand toward the sky, and there was a thick darkness in all the land of Mitzrayim three days.
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Exodus 10:22 CSB
So Moses stretched out his hand toward heaven, and there was thick darkness throughout the land of Egypt for three days.
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Exodus 10:22 KJV
And Moses stretched forth his hand toward heaven; and there was a thick darkness in all the land of Egypt three days:
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Exodus 10:22 LEB
And Moses stretched out his hand toward the heavens, and there was darkness of night in all the land of Egypt [for] three days.
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Exodus 10:22 NAS
So Moses stretched out his hand toward the sky, and there was thick darkness in all the land of Egypt for three days.
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Exodus 10:22 NCV
Moses raised his hand toward the sky, and total darkness was everywhere in Egypt for three days.
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Exodus 10:22 NIRV
So Moses reached out his hand toward the sky. Then complete darkness covered Egypt for three days.
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Exodus 10:22 NIV
So Moses stretched out his hand toward the sky, and total darkness covered all Egypt for three days.
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Exodus 10:22 NKJV
So Moses stretched out his hand toward heaven, and there was thick darkness in all the land of Egypt three days.
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Exodus 10:22 NLT
So Moses lifted his hand toward heaven, and there was deep darkness over the entire land for three days.
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Exodus 10:22 NRS
So Moses stretched out his hand toward heaven, and there was dense darkness in all the land of Egypt for three days.
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Exodus 10:22 RSV
So Moses stretched out his hand toward heaven, and there was thick darkness in all the land of Egypt three days;
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Exodus 10:22 DBY
And Moses stretched out his hand toward the heavens; and there was a thick darkness throughout the land of Egypt three days:
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Exodus 10:22 MSG
Moses stretched out his hand to the skies. Thick darkness descended on the land of Egypt for three days.
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Exodus 10:22 WBT
And Moses stretched forth his hand towards heaven: and there was a thick darkness in all the land of Egypt three days:
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Exodus 10:22 TMB
And Moses stretched forth his hand toward heaven, and there was a thick darkness in all the land of Egypt three days.
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Exodus 10:22 TNIV
So Moses stretched out his hand toward the sky, and total darkness covered all Egypt for three days.
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Exodus 10:22 TYN
And Moses stretched forth his hande vnto heaue, ad there was a darke myst vppo all the lande off Egipte. iij dayes longe
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Exodus 10:22 WEB
Moses stretched forth his hand toward the sky, and there was a thick darkness in all the land of Egypt three days.
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Exodus 10:22 WYC
And Moses held forth his hand into heaven, and horrible darknesses were made in all the land of Egypt; (And Moses stretched forth his hand toward the heavens, and a horrible darkness came upon all the land of Egypt;)
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Exodus 10:22 YLT
And Moses stretcheth out his hand towards the heavens, and there is darkness -- thick darkness in all the land of Egypt three days;
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Exodus 10 Commentary - Matthew Henry Commentary on the Whole Bible (Concise)

Chapter 10

The plague of locusts threatened, Pharaoh, moved by his servants, inclines to let the Israelites go. (1-11) The plague of locusts. (12-20) The plague of thick darkness. (21-29)

Verses 1-11 The plagues of Egypt show the sinfulness of sin. They warn the children of men not to strive with their Maker. Pharaoh had pretended to humble himself; but no account was made of it, for he was not sincere therein. The plague of locusts is threatened. This should be much worse than any of that kind which had ever been known. Pharaoh's attendants persuade him to come to terms with Moses. Hereupon Pharaoh will allow the men to go, falsely pretending that this was all they desired. He swears that they shall not remove their little ones. Satan does all he can to hinder those that serve God themselves, from bringing their children to serve him. He is a sworn enemy to early piety. Whatever would put us from engaging our children in God's service, we have reason to suspect Satan in it. Nor should the young forget that the Lord's counsel is, Remember thy Creator in the days of thy youth; but Satan's counsel is, to keep children in a state of slavery to sin and to the world. Mark that the great foe of man wishes to retain him by the ties of affection, as Pharaoh would have taken hostages from the Israelites for their return, by holding their wives and children in captivity. Satan is willing to share our duty and our service with the Saviour, because the Saviour will not accept those terms.

Verses 12-20 God bids Moses stretch out his hand; locusts came at the call. An army might more easily have been resisted than this host of insects. Who then is able to stand before the great God? They covered the face of the earth, and ate up the fruit of it. Herbs grow for the service of man; yet when God pleases, insects shall plunder him, and eat the bread out of his mouth. Let our labour be, not for the habitation and meat thus exposed, but for those which endure to eternal life. Pharaoh employs Moses and Aaron to pray for him. There are those, who, in distress, seek the help of other people's prayers, but have no mind to pray for themselves. They show thereby that they have no true love to God, nor any delight in communion with him. Pharaoh desires only that this death might be taken away, not this sin. He wishes to get rid of the plague of locusts, not the plague of a hard heart, which was more dangerous. An east wind brought the locusts, a west wind carries them off. Whatever point the wind is in, it is fulfilling God's word, and turns by his counsel. The wind bloweth where it listeth, as to us; but not so as it respects God. It was also an argument for their repentance; for by this it appeared that God is ready to forgive, and swift to show mercy. If he does this upon the outward tokens of humiliation, what will he do if we are sincere! Oh that this goodness of God might lead us to repentance! Pharaoh returned to his resolution again, not to let the people go. Those who have often baffled their convictions, are justly given up to the lusts of their hearts.

Verses 21-29 The plague of darkness brought upon Egypt was a dreadful plague. It was darkness which might be felt, so thick were the fogs. It astonished and terrified. It continued three days; six nights in one; so long the most lightsome palaces were dungeons. Now Pharaoh had time to consider, if he would have improved it. Spiritual darkness is spiritual bondage; while Satan blinds men's eyes that they see not, he binds their hands and feet, that they work not for God, nor move toward heaven. They sit in darkness. It was righteous with God thus to punish. The blindness of their minds brought upon them this darkness of the air; never was mind so blinded as Pharaoh's, never was air so darkened as Egypt. Let us dread the consequences of sin; if three days of darkness were so dreadful, what will everlasting darkness be? The children of Israel, at the same time, had light in their dwellings. We must not think we share in common mercies as a matter of course, and therefore that we owe no thanks to God for them. It shows the particular favour he bears to his people. Wherever there is an Israelite indeed, though in this dark world, there is light, there is a child of light. When God made this difference between the Israelites and the Egyptians, who would not have preferred the poor cottage of an Israelite to the fine palace of an Egyptian? There is a real difference between the house of the wicked, which is under a curse, and the habitation of the just, which is blessed. Pharaoh renewed the treaty with Moses and Aaron, and consented they should take their little ones, but would have their cattle left. It is common for sinners to bargain with God Almighty; thus they try to mock him, but they deceive themselves. The terms of reconciliation with God are so fixed, that though men dispute them ever so long, they cannot possibly alter them, or bring them lower. We must come to the demand of God's will; we cannot expect he should condescend to the terms our lusts would make. With ourselves and our children, we must devote all our worldly possessions to the service of God; we know not what use he will make of any part of what we have. Pharaoh broke off the conference abruptly, and resolved to treat no more. Had he forgotten how often he had sent for Moses to ease him of his plagues? and must he now be bid to come no more? Vain malice! to threaten him with death, who was armed with such power! What will not hardness of heart, and contempt of God's word and commandments, bring men to! After this, Moses came no more till he was sent for. When men drive God's word from them, he justly gives them up to their own delusions.

Exodus 10 Commentary - Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

CHAPTER 10

Exodus 10:1-20 . PLAGUE OF LOCUSTS.

1. show these my signs, &c.--Sinners even of the worst description are to be admonished even though there may be little hope of amendment, and hence those striking miracles that carried so clear and conclusive demonstration of the being and character of the true God were performed in lengthened series before Pharaoh to leave him without excuse when judgment should be finally executed.

2. And that thou mayest tell . . . of thy son, and of thy son's son, &c.--There was a further and higher reason for the infliction of those awful judgments, namely, that the knowledge of them there, and the permanent record of them still, might furnish a salutary and impressive lesson to the Church down to the latest ages. Worldly historians might have described them as extraordinary occurrences that marked this era of Moses in ancient Egypt. But we are taught to trace them to their cause: the judgments of divine wrath on a grossly idolatrous king and nations.

4. to-morrow will I bring the locusts--Moses was commissioned to renew the request, so often made and denied, with an assurance that an unfavorable answer would be followed on the morrow by an invasion of locusts. This species of insect resembles a large, spotted, red and black, double-winged grasshopper, about three inches or less in length, with the two hind legs working like hinged springs of immense strength and elasticity. Perhaps no more terrible scourge was ever brought on a land than those voracious insects, which fly in such countless numbers as to darken the land which they infest; and on whatever place they alight, they convert it into a waste and barren desert, stripping the ground of its verdure, the trees of their leaves and bark, and producing in a few hours a degree of desolation which it requires the lapse of years to repair.

7-11. Pharaoh's servants said--Many of his courtiers must have suffered serious losses from the late visitations, and the prospect of such a calamity as that which was threatened and the magnitude of which former experience enabled them to realize, led them to make a strong remonstrance with the king. Finding himself not seconded by his counsellors in his continued resistance, he recalled Moses and Aaron, and having expressed his consent to their departure, inquired who were to go. The prompt and decisive reply, "all," neither man nor beast shall remain, raised a storm of indignant fury in the breast of the proud king. He would permit the grown-up men to go away; but no other terms would be listened to.

11. they were driven out from Pharaoh's presence--In the East, when a person of authority and rank feels annoyed by a petition which he is unwilling to grant, he makes a signal to his attendants, who rush forward and, seizing the obnoxious suppliant by the neck, drag him out of the chamber with violent haste. Of such a character was the impassioned scene in the court of Egypt when the king had wrought himself into such a fit of uncontrollable fury as to treat ignominiously the two venerable representatives of the Hebrew people.

13-19. the Lord brought an east wind--The rod of Moses was again raised, and the locusts came. They are natives of the desert and are only brought by an east wind into Egypt, where they sometimes come in sun-obscuring clouds, destroying in a few days every green blade in the track they traverse. Man, with all his contrivances, can do nothing to protect himself from the overwhelming invasion. Egypt has often suffered from locusts. But the plague that followed the wave of the miraculous rod was altogether unexampled. Pharaoh, fearing irretrievable ruin to his country, sent in haste for Moses, and confessing his sin, implored the intercession of Moses, who entreated the Lord, and a "mighty strong west wind took away the locusts."

Exodus 10:21-29 . PLAGUE OF DARKNESS.

21-23. Stretch out thine hand toward heaven, that there may be darkness--Whatever secondary means were employed in producing it, whether thick clammy fogs and vapors, according to some; a sandstorm, or the chamsin, according to others; it was such that it could be almost perceived by the organs of touch, and so protracted as to continue for three days, which the chamsin does [HENGSTENBERG]. The appalling character of this calamity consisted in this, that the sun was an object of Egyptian idolatry; that the pure and serene sky of that country was never marred by the appearance of a cloud. And here, too, the Lord made a marked difference between Goshen and the rest of Egypt.

24-26. Pharaoh called unto Moses, and said, Go ye, serve the Lord--Terrified by the preternatural darkness, the stubborn king relents, and proposes another compromise--the flocks and herds to be left as hostages for their return. But the crisis is approaching, and Moses insists on every iota of his demand. The cattle would be needed for sacrifice--how many or how few could not be known till their arrival at the scene of religious observance. But the emancipation of Israel from Egyptian bondage was to be complete.

28. Pharaoh said, . . . Get thee from me--The calm firmness of Moses provoked the tyrant. Frantic with disappointment and rage, with offended and desperate malice, he ordered him from his presence and forbade him ever to return. "Moses said, Thou hast spoken well" ( Exodus 10:29 ).