Ezekiel 27:11

11 Men of Arvad and Helek guarded your walls on every side; men of Gammad were in your towers. They hung their shields around your walls; they brought your beauty to perfection.

Read Ezekiel 27:11 Using Other Translations

The men of Arvad with thine army were upon thy walls round about, and the Gammadims were in thy towers: they hanged their shields upon thy walls round about; they have made thy beauty perfect.
Men of Arvad and Helech were on your walls all around, and men of Gamad were in your towers. They hung their shields on your walls all around; they made perfect your beauty.
Men from Arvad and Helech stood on your walls. Your towers were manned by men from Gammad. Their shields hung on your walls, completing your beauty.

What does Ezekiel 27:11 mean?

John Gill's Exposition of the Bible
Ezekiel 27:11

The men of Arvad, with thine army were upon thy walls round
about
Placed there for the defence of the city, to watch against an enemy, lest it should be surprised; here they were upon the patrol day and night; see ( Isaiah 62:6 ) , these were the men of the same place before mentioned, ( Ezekiel 27:8 ) which furnished Tyre both with mariners and soldiers: and the Gammadims were in thy towers:
not the Medes, as Symmachus renders it; nor the Cappadocians, as the Targum; much less were they images of their tutelar gods, as Spencer thinks, of a cubit long; nor "pygmies", as the Vulgate Latin version renders it; which to mention would not be to the honour of their militia; though Kimchi and Ben Melech call them dwarfs, men of a small stature, of a cubit high, from whence they are supposed to have their name; so Schindler F17: rather they were the inhabitants of some place in Phoenicia; either of Ancon; which in Greek signifies a cubit, as Gamad does in Hebrew; or of Gammade, the same which Pliny F18 corruptly calls Gamale. Hillerus F19 thinks the word signifies "ambidexters", or left handed men, such as Ehud: they hanged their shields upon thy walls roundabout.
Kimchi and Ben Melech observe it was a custom in some places to hang such weapons upon the tops of towers, and upon the walls of them; which might be done, either that they might be ready to take up and make use of, whenever occasion required; or to dismay their enemies, and to show them that they were provided for them: they have made thy beauty perfect;
besides the beauty of her buildings and shipping, there was the beauty of her militia; which was increased by the soldiers from Persia, Lydia, and Lybia, and added to by the men of Arvad, but completed by the Gammadim; and particularly being glided, as probably they were, looked very glittering and beautiful in the rays of the sun.


FOOTNOTES:

F17 Lexic. Pentaglott. col. 319, 320.
F18 Nat. Hist. l. 2. c. 91.
F19 Onomast. Sacr. p. 159.
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