Hosea 7:5

5 On the day of the festival of our king the princes become inflamed with wine, and he joins hands with the mockers.

Read Hosea 7:5 Using Other Translations

In the day of our king the princes have made him sick with bottles of wine; he stretched out his hand with scorners.
On the day of our king, the princes became sick with the heat of wine; he stretched out his hand with mockers.
On royal holidays, the princes get drunk with wine, carousing with those who mock them.

What does Hosea 7:5 mean?

John Gill's Exposition of the Bible
Hosea 7:5

In the day of our king
Either his birthday, or his coronation day, when he was inaugurated into his kingly office, as the Targum, Jarchi, and Kimchi; or the day on which Jeroboam set up the calves, which might be kept as an anniversary: or, "it is the day of our king" F15; and may be the words of the priests and false prophets, exciting the people to adultery; and may show by what means they drew them into it, saying this is the king's birthday, or coronation day, or a holy day of his appointing, let us meet together, and drink his health; and so by indulging to intemperance, through the heat of wine, led them on to adultery, corporeal or spiritual, or both: the princes have made [him] sick with bottles of wine:
that is, the courtiers who attended at court on such a day to compliment the king upon the occasion, and to drink his health, drank to him in large cups, perhaps a bottle of wine at once; which he pledging them in the same manner, made him sick or drunk: to make any man drunk is criminal, and especially a king; as it was also a weakness and sin in him to drink to excess, which is not for kings, of all men, to do: or it may be rendered, "the princes became sick through the heat of wine" F16, so Jarchi; they were made sick by others, or they made themselves so by drinking too much wine, which inflamed their bodies, gorged their stomachs, made their heads dizzy, and them so "weak", as the word F17 also signifies, that they could not stand upon their legs; which are commonly the effects of excessive drinking, especially in those who are not used to it, as the king and the princes might not be, only on such occasions: he stretched out his hand with scorners;
meaning the king, who, in his cups, forgetting his royal dignity, used too much familiarity with persons of low life, and of an ill behaviour, irreligious ones; who, especially when drunk, made a jest of all religion; scoffed at good men, and everything that was serious; and even set their mouths against the heavens; denied there was a God, or spoke very indecently and irreverently of him; these the king made his drinking companions, took the cup, and drank to them in turn, and shook them by the hand; or admitted them to kiss his hand, and were all together, hail fellows well met. Joseph Kimchi thinks these are the same with the princes, called so before they were drunk, but afterwards "scorners".


FOOTNOTES:

F15 (wnklm Mwy) "dies regis nostri", V. L. Calvin, Tigurine version, Tarnovius, Cocceius, Schmidt.
F16 (Nyym tmx Myrv wlxh) "argotarunt principes a calore vini", Liveleus; "morbo afficiunt se calore ex vino", Tarnovius.
F17 "Quem infirmant principes aestu a vino", Cocceius; "infirmum facerunt", Munster; "infirmant", Schmidt.
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