Job 18:14

14 He is torn from the security of his tent and marched off to the king of terrors.

Read Job 18:14 Using Other Translations

His confidence shall be rooted out of his tabernacle, and it shall bring him to the king of terrors.
He is torn from the tent in which he trusted and is brought to the king of terrors.
They are torn from the security of their homes and are brought down to the king of terrors.

What does Job 18:14 mean?

John Gill's Exposition of the Bible
Job 18:14

His confidence shall be rooted out of his tabernacle
That which his confidence was placed in, his wealth and riches, his family, particularly his children, in all which he placed his confidence of future prosperity and happiness; these should be all taken away from him, and his house cleared of them all; or his good, sound, and healthful constitution, on account of which he promised himself long life, this he should be deprived of, and it should be taken out of the tabernacle of his body; or his hope and confidence of eternal happiness in another world, this should perish, and be as the giving up of the ghost: or the words may be rendered, "he shall be rooted out of his tabernacle [which was] his confidence" F2; that is, his soul shall be taken out of his body by death, in which it dwelt as in a tabernacle, and where he hoped to have had a long continuance; death is a rooting of a man out of it, and even out of the world, see ( Psalms 52:5 ) ;

and it shall bring him to the king of terrors;
either famine, by which his strength is weakened, or destruction that is at his side, or the firstborn of death, or his vain confidence: or this may be the sense, "thou (O God) wilt bring him", or "cause him to go to the king of terrors" F3; to death; all men are brought unto it, but not all unto it as a king of terrors; as good men, such as Simeon, the Apostle Paul, and others, but wicked men. Death is a king: it reigns, it has a large empire, even the whole world; its subjects are numerous, all, high and low, rich and poor, great and small; and the duration of its reign is long, it reigned from Adam to Moses, from Moses to the coming of Christ, and from thence to this day, and will to the end of the world, and it reigns with an irresistible power: and this king is a king of terrors to wicked men; it is, as Aristotle F4 calls it, the most terrible of terribles; it is terrible to nature, being a dissolution of it; and it must be terrible to mere natural men, who have nothing to support them under it, and no views beyond the grave to comfort them, and cause them to go cheerful through it; but, on the other hand, have not only the bitterness of death to endure, but have terrible apprehensions of a future judgment that comes after it. Some render it, "the king of darkness" F5, extreme darkness, blackness of darkness, utter darkness, which wicked men at death are brought unto. Jarchi interprets it of the king of demons, the devil; and to be brought to him is to be brought to hell and eternal damnation: so some render it, "terrors shall bring him to his king" F6, the devil; or rather "terrors shall come upon him like a king" F7, in a very grand, powerful, and formidable manner.


FOOTNOTES:

F2 Michaelis.
F3 De Dieu.
F4 Ethic. l. 3. c. 9.
F5 (twhlb Klml) "ad regem caliginum", Cocceius.
F6 Schmidt.
F7 "Instar regis", Schultens; "quasi rex", V. L.
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