Lamentations 1:7

7 In the days of her affliction and wandering Jerusalem remembers all the treasures that were hers in days of old. When her people fell into enemy hands, there was no one to help her. Her enemies looked at her and laughed at her destruction.

Read Lamentations 1:7 Using Other Translations

Jerusalem remembered in the days of her affliction and of her miseries all her pleasant things that she had in the days of old, when her people fell into the hand of the enemy, and none did help her: the adversaries saw her, and did mock at her sabbaths.
Jerusalem remembers in the days of her affliction and wandering all the precious things that were hers from days of old. When her people fell into the hand of the foe, and there was none to help her, her foes gloated over her; they mocked at her downfall.
In the midst of her sadness and wandering, Jerusalem remembers her ancient splendor. But now she has fallen to her enemy, and there is no one to help her. Her enemy struck her down and laughed as she fell.

What does Lamentations 1:7 mean?

John Gill's Exposition of the Bible
Lamentations 1:7

Jerusalem remembered in the days of her affliction and of her
miseries
When carried captive, and in exile in a foreign land; when surrounded with distresses and calamities of various kinds; which are a means sometimes of rubbing up and refreshing the memories of persons with those good things they take little notice of in the times of prosperity; the worth of such things being best known and prized by the want of them: even all her pleasant things that she had in the days of old;
her civil and religious liberties; the word, worship, and ordinances of God; the temple, altars, and courts of the Lord; the ark of the testimony, the symbol of the divine Presence; and the revelation of the will of God by the prophets; their peace, prosperity, and enjoyment of all good things: these were remembered when her people fell into the hand of the enemy;
the Chaldeans. The Targum is,

``into the hand of Nebuchadnezzar the wicked, and he oppressed them:''
and none did help her;
not the Egyptians, her allies and confederates, in whom she trusted: her adversaries saw her, [and] did mock at her sabbaths;
as the Heathens used to do; calling the Jews Sabbatarians F15; by way of derision; representing them as an idle lazy people, who observed a seventh day merely out of sloth, and so lost a seventh part of time {p}; or they mocked at them for keeping them in vain; since, notwithstanding their religious observance of them, they were suffered to be carried captive out of their land; or, as Jarchi thinks, the Chaldeans mocked at them for keeping their sabbaths strictly, now they were in other lands, when they neglected them in their own country; or they jeered them with their weekly and yearly sabbaths; suggesting to them that now they had leisure enough to observe them; and that their land ceased from tillage with a witness now: some think, that because of the observance of a sabbath, they were obliged to by their law, therefore the Heathens made them work the harder, and imposed greater tasks upon them on that day than on others, like the Egyptians of old; though the words may be rendered, "they mocked at her cessations" F17; from joy and pleasure, peace and comfort, and the enjoyment of all good things; so the Targum,
``the enemies saw her when she went into captivity; and they mocked at the good things which ceased out of the midst of her.''

FOOTNOTES:

F15 "Quod jejunia sabbatariorum". Martial. l. 4. Epigr. 4.
F16 "----Cui septima quaeque fuit lux Ignava, et partem vitae non attigit ullam". Juvenal. Satyr. 5.
F17 (hytbvm le wqxv) "irrident cessationes ejus", Junius & Tremellius; "rident propter cesstiones", Piscator.
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