Compare Translations for 1 Samuel 26:13

1 Samuel 26:13 ASV
Then David went over to the other side, and stood on the top of the mountain afar off; a great space being between them;
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1 Samuel 26:13 BBE
Then David went over to the other side, and took his place on the top of a mountain some distance away, with a great space between them;
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1 Samuel 26:13 CEB
David crossed over to the other side and stood on top of a hill with considerable distance between them.
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1 Samuel 26:13 CJB
David crossed to the other side and climbed to the top of the distant ridge, leaving a considerable space between them.
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1 Samuel 26:13 RHE
And when David was gone over to the other side, and stood on the top of the hill afar off, and a good space was between them,
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1 Samuel 26:13 ESV
Then David went over to the other side and stood far off on the top of the hill, with a great space between them.
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1 Samuel 26:13 GW
David went over to the other side and stood on top of the hill some distance away. (There was a wide space between them.)
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1 Samuel 26:13 GNT
Then David crossed over to the other side of the valley to the top of the hill, a safe distance away,
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1 Samuel 26:13 HNV
Then David went over to the other side, and stood on the top of the mountain afar off; a great space being between them;
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1 Samuel 26:13 CSB
David crossed to the other side and stood on top of the mountain at a distance; there was a considerable space between them.
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1 Samuel 26:13 KJV
Then David went over to the other side, and stood on the top of an hill afar off; a great space being between them:
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1 Samuel 26:13 LEB
Then David went to the other side and stood on the top of the hill at a distance; the distance [was] great between them.
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1 Samuel 26:13 NAS
Then David crossed over to the other side and stood on top of the mountain at a distance with a large area between them.
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1 Samuel 26:13 NCV
David crossed over to the other side of the hill and stood on top of the mountain far from Saul's camp. They were a long way away from each other.
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1 Samuel 26:13 NIRV
David went across to the other side of the valley. He stood on top of a hill far away from Saul's camp. There was a wide space between them.
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1 Samuel 26:13 NIV
Then David crossed over to the other side and stood on top of the hill some distance away; there was a wide space between them.
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1 Samuel 26:13 NKJV
Now David went over to the other side, and stood on the top of a hill afar off, a great distance being between them.
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1 Samuel 26:13 NLT
David climbed the hill opposite the camp until he was at a safe distance.
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1 Samuel 26:13 NRS
Then David went over to the other side, and stood on top of a hill far away, with a great distance between them.
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1 Samuel 26:13 RSV
Then David went over to the other side, and stood afar off on the top of the mountain, with a great space between them;
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1 Samuel 26:13 DBY
And David went over to the other side, and stood on the top of a hill afar off; a great space [being] between them.
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1 Samuel 26:13 MSG
Then David went across to the opposite hill and stood far away on the top of the mountain. With this safe distance between them,
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1 Samuel 26:13 WBT
Then David went over to the other side, and stood on the top of a hill afar off; a great space [being] between them:
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1 Samuel 26:13 TMB
Then David went over to the other side and stood on the top of a hill afar off, a great space being between them.
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1 Samuel 26:13 TNIV
Then David crossed over to the other side and stood on top of the hill some distance away; there was a wide space between them.
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1 Samuel 26:13 WEB
Then David went over to the other side, and stood on the top of the mountain afar off; a great space being between them;
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1 Samuel 26:13 WYC
And when David had passed [over] even against, and had stood on the top of the hill afar (off), and a great space was betwixt them,
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1 Samuel 26:13 YLT
And David passeth over to the other side, and standeth on the top of the hill afar off -- great [is] the place between them;
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1 Samuel 26 Commentary - Matthew Henry Commentary on the Whole Bible (Concise)

Chapter 26

Saul goes after David, who again spares Saul's life. (1-12) David exhorts Saul. (13-20) Saul acknowledges his sin. (21-25)

Verses 1-12 How soon do unholy hearts lose the good impressions convictions have made upon them! How helpless were Saul and all his men! All as though disarmed and chained, yet nothing is done to them; they are only asleep. How easily can God weaken the strongest, befool the wisest, and baffle the most watchful! David still resolved to wait till God thought fit to avenge him on Saul. He will by no means force his way to the promised crown by any wrong methods. The temptation was very strong; but if he yielded, he would sin against God, therefore he resisted the temptation, and trusted God with the event.

Verses 13-20 David reasoned seriously and affectionately with Saul. Those who forbid our attendance on God's ordinances, do what they can to estrange us from God, and to make us heathens. We are to reckon that which exposes us to sin the greatest injury that can be done us. If the Lord stirred thee up against me, either in displeasure to me, taking this way to punish me for my sins against him, or in displeasure to thee, if it be the effect of that evil spirit from the Lord which troubles thee; let Him accept an offering from us both. Let us join in seeking peace, and to be reconciled with God by sacrifice.

Verses 21-25 Saul repeated his good words and good wishes. But he showed no evidence of true repentance towards God. David and Saul parted to meet no more. No reconciliation among men is firm, which is not founded in an cemented by peace with God through Jesus Christ. In sinning against God, men play the fool, and err exceedingly. Many obtain a passing view of these truths, who hate and close their eyes against the light. Fair professions do not entitle those to confidence who have long sinned against the light, yet the confessions of obstinate sinners may satisfy us that we are in the right way, and encourage us to persevere, expecting our recompence from the Lord alone.

1 Samuel 26 Commentary - Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

CHAPTER 26

1 Samuel 26:1-4 . SAUL COMES TO THE HILL OF HACHILAH AGAINST DAVID.

1, 2. the Ziphites came unto Saul to Gibeah--This people seem to have thought it impossible for David to escape, and therefore recommended themselves to Saul, by giving him secret information The knowledge of their treachery makes it appear strange that David should return to his former haunt in their neighborhood; but, perhaps he did it to be near Abigail's possessions, and under the impression that Saul had become mollified. But the king had relapsed into his old enmity. Though Gibeah, as its name imports, stood on an elevated position, and the desert of Ziph, which was in the hilly region of Judea, may have been higher than Gibeah, it was still necessary to descend in leaving the latter place; thence Saul "went down to the wilderness of Ziph."

4, 5. David . . . sent out spies . . . and David arose, and came to the place where Saul had pitched--Having obtained certain information of the locality, he seems, accompanied by his nephew ( 1 Samuel 26:6 ), to have hid himself, perhaps disguised, in a neighboring wood, or hill, on the skirts of the royal camp towards night, and waited to approach it under covert of the darkness.

1 Samuel 26:5-25 . DAVID STAYS ABISHAI FROM KILLING SAUL, BUT TAKES HIS SPEAR AND CRUSE.

5. Saul lay in the trench, and the people pitched round about him--Among the nomad people of the East, the encampments are usually made in a circular form. The circumference is lined by the baggage and the men, while the chief's station is in the center, whether he occupy a tent or not. His spear, stuck in the ground, indicates his position. Similar was the disposition of Saul's camp--in this hasty expedition he seems to have carried no tent, but to have slept on the ground. The whole troop was sunk in sleep around him.

8-12. Then said Abishai to David, God hath delivered thine enemy into thine hand--This midnight stratagem shows the activity and heroic enterprise of David's mind, and it was in unison with the style of warfare in ancient times.
let me smite him . . . even to the earth at once--The ferocious vehemence of the speaker is sufficiently apparent from his language, but David's magnanimity soared far above the notions of his followers. Though Saul's cruelty and perfidy and general want of right principle had sunk him to a low pitch of degradation, yet that was no reason for David's imitating him in doing wrong. Besides, he was the sovereign; David was a subject. Though God had rejected him from the kingdom, it was in every way the best and most dutiful course, instead of precipitating his fall by imbruing their hands in his blood and thereby contracting the guilt of a great crime, to wait the awards of that retributive providence which sooner or later would take him off by some sudden and mortal blow. He who, with impetuous haste was going to exterminate Nabal, meekly spared Saul. But Nabal refused to give a tribute to which justice and gratitude, no less than custom, entitled David. Saul was under the judicial infatuation of heaven. Thus David withheld the hand of Abishai; but, at the same time, he directed him to carry off some things which would show where they had been, and what they had done. Thus he obtained the best of victories over him, by heaping coals of fire on his head.

11. the spear that is at his bolster, and the cruse of water--The Oriental spear had, and still has, a spike at the lower extremity, intended for the purpose of sticking the spear into the ground when the warrior is at rest. This common custom of Arab sheiks was also the practice of the Hebrew chiefs.
at his bolster--literally, "at his head"; perhaps, Saul as a sovereign had the distinguished luxury of a bolster carried for him. A "cruse of water" is usually, in warm climates, kept near a person's couch, as a drink in the night time is found very refreshing. Saul's cruse would probably be of superior materials, or more richly ornamented than common ones, and therefore by its size or form be easily distinguished.

13-20. Then David . . . stood on the top of an hill afar off . . . and cried to the The extraordinary purity and elasticity of the air in Palestine enable words to be distinctly heard that are addressed by a speaker from the top of one hill to people on that of another, from which it is separated by a deep intervening ravine. Hostile parties can thus speak to each other, while completely beyond the reach of each other's attack. It results from the peculiar features of the country in many of the mountain districts.

15. David said to Abner, Art not thou a valiant man: . . . wherefore then hast thou not kept thy lord the king?--The circumstance of David having penetrated to the center of the encampment, through the circular rows of the sleeping soldiers, constituted the point of this sarcastic taunt. This new evidence of David's moderation and magnanimous forbearance, together with his earnest and kindly expostulation, softened the obduracy of Saul's heart.

19. If the Lord have stirred thee up against me--By the evil spirit He had sent, or by any spiritual offenses by which we have mutually displeased Him.
let him accept an offering--that is, let us conjointly offer a sacrifice for appeasing His wrath against us.
if they be the children of men--The prudence, meekness, and address of David in ascribing the king's enmity to the instigations of some malicious traducers, and not to the jealousy of Saul himself, is worthy of notice.
saying, Go, serve other gods--This was the drift of their conduct. By driving him from the land and ordinances of the true worship, into foreign and heathen countries, they were exposing him to all the seductions of idolatry.

20. as when one doth hunt a partridge--People in the East, in hunting the partridge and other game birds, pursue them, till observing them becoming languid and fatigued after they have been put up two or three times, they rush upon the birds stealthily and knock them down with bludgeons [SHAW, Travels]. It was exactly in this manner that Saul was pursuing David. He drove him from time to time from his hiding-place, hoping to render him weary of his life, or obtain an opportunity of accomplishing his destruction.

25. So David went on his way--Notwithstanding this sudden relenting of Saul, David placed no confidence in his professions or promises, but wisely kept at a distance and awaited the course of Providence.