Luke 1:35

Shall overshadow thee (episkiasei). A figure of a cloud coming upon her. Common in ancient Greek in the sense of obscuring and with accusative as of Peter's shadow in Acts 5:15 . But we have seen it used of the shining bright cloud at the Transfiguration of Jesus ( Matthew 17:5 ; Mark 9:7 ; Luke 9:34 ). Here it is like the Shekinah glory which suggests it ( Exodus 40:38 ) where the cloud of glory represents the presence and power of God. Holy, the Son of God (Hagion uio qeou). Here again the absence of the article makes it possible for it to mean "Son of God." See Matthew 5:9 . But this title, like the Son of Man (Ho uio tou anqrwpou) was a recognized designation of the Messiah. Jesus did not often call himself Son of God ( Matthew 27:43 ), but it is assumed in his frequent use of the Father, the Son ( Matthew 11:27 ; Luke 10:21 ; John 5:19 ). It is the title used by the Father at the baptism ( Luke 3:22 ) and on the Mount of Transfiguration ( Luke 9:35 ). The wonder of Mary would increase at these words. The Miraculous Conception or Virgin Birth of Jesus is thus plainly set forth in Luke as in Matthew. The fact that Luke was a physician gives added interest to his report.