Fable

Fable. [N] [E]

A fable is a narrative in which being irrational, and sometimes inanimate, are, for the purpose of moral instruction, feigned to act and speak with human interests and passions. --Encyc. Brit. The fable differs from the parable in that --

  1. The parable always relates what actually takes place, and is true to fact, which the fable is not; and
  2. The parable teaches the higher heavenly and spiritual truths, but the fable only earthly moralities. Of the fable, as distinguished from the parable [PARABLE], we have but two examples in the Bible:
  3. That of the trees choosing their king, addressed by Jotham to the men of Shechem, ( Judges 9:8-15 )
  4. That of the cedar of Lebanon and the thistle, as the answer of Jehoash to the challenge of Amaziah. ( 2 Kings 14:9 ) The fables of false teachers claiming to belong to the Christian Church, alluded to by writers of the New Testament, ( 1 Timothy 1:4 ; 4:7 ; Titus 1:14 ; 2 Peter 1:16 ) do not appear to have had the character of fables, properly so called.

[N] indicates this entry was also found in Nave's Topical Bible
[E] indicates this entry was also found in Easton's Bible Dictionary

Bibliography Information

Smith, William, Dr. "Entry for 'Fable'". "Smith's Bible Dictionary". . 1901.
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