In the Old Testament the word rendered chamberlain, caric, is more properly "eunuch," an officer which oriental monarchs placed over their harems (Esther 1:10,12,15; 2:3,14,21; 4:4; 6:2,14; 7:9; 2 Kings 23:11). This officer seems also to have had other duties. See under \EUNUCH\. In the New Testament:

(1) oikonomos, literally manager of the household, apparently the "treasurer" as in the Revised Version (British and American) "Erastus the treasurer of the city saluteth you" (Romans 16:23). Compare adapted use as applied to Christian apostles and teachers, bishops, and even to individual members; in which cases, rendered "stewards" (1 Corinthians 4:1; Titus 1:7; 1 Peter 4:10).

(2) In Acts 12:20, "Blastus the king's chamberlain" (ho epi toa koitonos tou basileos, "he who is over the king's bed-chamber"), not treasure-chamber, as above; here praefectus cubiculo, or chief valet de chambre to the royal person, a position involving much honor and intimacy.

Edward Bagby Pollard

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Bibliography Information
Orr, James, M.A., D.D. General Editor. "Entry for 'CHAMBERLAIN'". "International Standard Bible Encyclopedia". 1915.