Ezekiel 2:6

6 And you, son of man, do not be afraid of them or their words. Do not be afraid, though briers and thorns are all around you and you live among scorpions. Do not be afraid of what they say or be terrified by them, though they are a rebellious people.

Read Ezekiel 2:6 Using Other Translations

And thou, son of man, be not afraid of them, neither be afraid of their words, though briers and thorns be with thee, and thou dost dwell among scorpions: be not afraid of their words, nor be dismayed at their looks, though they be a rebellious house.
And you, son of man, be not afraid of them, nor be afraid of their words, though briers and thorns are with you and you sit on scorpions. Be not afraid of their words, nor be dismayed at their looks, for they are a rebellious house.
“Son of man, do not fear them or their words. Don’t be afraid even though their threats surround you like nettles and briers and stinging scorpions. Do not be dismayed by their dark scowls, even though they are rebels.

What does Ezekiel 2:6 mean?

John Gill's Exposition of the Bible
Ezekiel 2:6

And thou, son of man, be not afraid of them
Of any of them, the greatest among them, their princes and nobles; who, by their grandeur and authority, their stern looks, and big words, might awe and terrify him; wherefore it follows: neither be afraid of their words;
of their calumnies, revilings, and reproaches, their scoffs and jeers, their menaces and threatenings: though briers and thorns [be] with thee;
that is, men comparable to such; wicked men are like to briers and thorns, ( 2 Samuel 23:6 ) ( Isaiah 27:4 ) ; are grieving, pricking, and distressing to good men, and are of no worth and value; are useless and unprofitable, and fit fuel for everlasting burning. The Targum is,

``for they are rebellious, and hard against thee;''
so Jarchi and Kimchi explain the first word, (Mybro) , translated "briers", as signifying rebellious and disobedient; though the former observes, that R. Donesh interprets it of a kind of thorns, of which there are twenty names, and this is one: and thou dost dwell among scorpions;
that is, as the Targum paraphrases it,
``thou dwellest in the midst of a people whose works are like to scorpions.''
Some interpret it, as Kimchi observes, of sharp thorns, of a thorny plant that grows in the form of a scorpion F1; but scorpions here are a kind of serpents, subtle, venomous, and mischievous, which have stings in their tails; which, as Pliny says, they are continually thrusting out, and striking with, that they may lose no opportunity of doing hurt F2; and fitly describe wicked men their subtlety and mischievous nature, be not afraid of their words;
as before; with which they are like briers, thorns, and scorpions, being very grievous, defamatory, and mischievous: nor be dismayed at their looks:
their frowning furious, and angry countenances; forbidding with which, as well as with their words, the prophet from prophesying unto them: though,
or "for", they [be] a rebellious house; (See Gill on Ezekiel 2:5).
FOOTNOTES:

F1 Plin. Nat. Hist. l. 21. c. 15. and l. 22. c. 16.
F2 Plin. Nat. Hist. l. 11. c. 25.
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