Lewis' is a large department store in Birmingham, England. Some years ago, the store wanted to expand, and one of their projected building areas held a Friends Meeting House, a small Quaker chapel. A representative of Lewis' sent a letter to the Quaker congregation, saying, "Dear sirs. We wish to extend our premises. We see that your building is right in the way. We wish therefore to buy your building and demolish it so that we might expand our store. We will pay any price you care to name. If you'll name a price we will settle the matter as quickly as possible."

A letter came back in the return mail: "Dear sirs. We in the Friends' meeting house note the desire of Lewis' to extend. We observe that our building is right in your way. We would point out, however, that we have been on our site somewhat longer than you have been on yours, and we are determined to stay where we are. We are so determined to stay that we will happily buy Lewis'. If therefore you would like to name a suitable price we will settle the matter as quickly as possible."

What a ludicrous response, Lewis' representative must have thought, that a small Quaker congregation could purchase this great department store. At least he might have thought that until he saw the signature at the bottom of the letter: it was signed "Cadbury." The Cadbury company is an enormous chocolate and candy manufacturer in England, and the Cadburys -- who were Quakers -- could buy Lewis' many times over.

It's important to see who signs the letter. When you and I stand for moral and spiritual truth in a depraved culture, we may be mocked as puny foes -- but it is God who has written the letter. The very resources of heaven stand behind us when we stand for Christ.


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Story by:
Donald English