Psalms 18:29

29 With your help I can advance against a troop[a] ; with my God I can scale a wall.

Psalms 18:29 in Other Translations

KJV
29 For by thee I have run through a troop; and by my God have I leaped over a wall.
ESV
29 For by you I can run against a troop, and by my God I can leap over a wall.
NLT
29 In your strength I can crush an army; with my God I can scale any wall.
MSG
29 I smash the bands of marauders, I vault the highest fences.
CSB
29 With You I can attack a barrier, and with my God I can leap over a wall.

Psalms 18:29 Meaning and Commentary

Psalms 18:29

For by thee I have run through a troop
Or, "I have run to a troop": to meet one F6 with courage and intrepidity, as some interpret it F7; or, as others F8, "I have run after a troop": that is, pursued after one, as David pursued after the troops of the Amalekites who burnt Ziklag, ( 1 Samuel 30:8 ) ; to which Jarchi refers this passage; or rather, "I have broke a troop", or "through one" F9; for the word, as some Jewish writers F11 observe, comes from a root which signifies to "break" in pieces, and is fitly used for the destroying or cutting in pieces a troop of the enemy; and is true of Christ, when he engaged with the troops of hell, and broke the squadrons of the infernal fiends, and spoiled or disarmed principalities and powers, and triumphed over them on the cross, and made a show of them openly, when he dragged them at his chariot wheels, and led captivity captive;

and by my God have I leaped over a wall;
which refers to the scaling of walls, and taking of fortified places; and so the Targum, "By the word of my God I will subdue fortified towns"; so Apollinarius has it, passed over a tower, or took it; which was literally true of David, in many instances. Jarchi applies this to his taking the fortress of Zion from the Jebusites: a learned writer F12 thinks this refers to his leaping over the city wall, and slipping through the city watch, when Michal let him down through a window: it may be applied to Christ, who broke down the middle wail of partition, the ceremonial law, which stood between Jew and Gentile; or rather it may design the many difficulties which were in the way of the salvation of his people, which he surmounted and got over with great strength and swiftness; such as fulfilling the law, satisfying justice, bearing sin, and making atonement for it, undergoing a shameful and an accursed death, and grappling with numerous enemies, whom he conquered; and he is said to do all this by his God; because, as man and Mediator, he was strengthened and assisted by him.


FOOTNOTES:

F6 (dwdg Uwra) "occurram turmae", so some in Vatablus.
F7 Apud Kimchi in loc.
F8 Apud Aben Ezra in loc.
F9 "Conteram", Pagninus; "perfregi", Vatablus; "perrupi", Musculus; "perrumpo", Tigurine version, Castalio; so Ainsworth.
F11 Kimchi & Ben Melech.
F12 Delaney's Life of King David, vol. 1. p. 62.

Psalms 18:29 In-Context

27 You save the humble but bring low those whose eyes are haughty.
28 You, LORD, keep my lamp burning; my God turns my darkness into light.
29 With your help I can advance against a troop ; with my God I can scale a wall.
30 As for God, his way is perfect: The LORD’s word is flawless; he shields all who take refuge in him.
31 For who is God besides the LORD? And who is the Rock except our God?

Cross References 1

  • 1. ver 32,39; Isaiah 45:5; Hebrews 11:34

Footnotes 1

  • [a]. Or "can run through a barricade"