Ono.

"Ono was distant three miles from Lydda. R. Jacob Ben Dositheus said, From Lydda to Ono are three miles; and I, on a certain time, went thither before daybreak, up to the ankles in honey of figs." R. Simai and R. Zadok went to intercalate the year in Lydda, and kept the Sabbath in Ono.

The Talmudists suppose this city was walled down from the days of Joshua; but fired in the war of Gibeah: because it is said, "All the cities also, to which they came, they set on fire," Judges 20:48; but that it was rebuilt by Elpaal, a Benjamite, 1 Chronicles 8:12; "R. Lazar Ben R. Josah saith, It was destroyed in the days of the concubine in Gibeah; but Elpaal stood forth and repaired it."

With Lod and Ono is also joined "The valley of craftsmen," Nehemiah 11:35; which some of the Jews suppose to be a particular city; and that it was walled from the days of Joshua. "But saith R. Chananiah, in the name of R. Phineas, Lod and Ono themselves are the valley of craftsmen." That R. Chananiah was a citizen of the city of Ono, eminent among the Rabbins, "one of the five learned who judged before the wise men. These were Ben Azzai, Ben Zuma, Chanan, and Chananiah, and Ben Nanas."

Why the maps placed Lod and Ono near Jordan, not far from Jericho, I can meet with no other reason than that in Josephus is found the town Adida, not far from thence, and Hadid is reckoned with Lod and Ono in Ezra 2:33; and Lod and Hadid are framed into one word Lodadi, Ezra 2:33, and Lodadid, Nehemiah 7:37, by the Seventy interpreters. But there were more places called by the name of Adida; so that that reason fails, if that were the reason. For there was 'Adida in Sephel,' ('Adida in the valley'); and "The city Adida in the mountain; under which lie the plains of Judea." And "Adida in Galilee before the great plain," if it were not the same with "Adida in Sephel."

Of Lydda, which we are now near when we are speaking of Ono, let that be considered, for the sake of young students, which the Gloss adviseth, That Lydda is called also Lodicea: and frequent mention is made of "the martyrs in Lydda," which is sometimes also pronounced "the martyrs in Lodicea"; as in that story among other places; "When the tyrant [or Trajan] endeavoured to kill Lolienus [perhaps Julianus] and Papus his brother in Lodicea, &c." [the Gloss, Lodicea, that is, Lydda] "he said to them, If you are of the people of Ananias, Michael, and Azarias, let your God come, and deliver you out of my hand."

The martyrdom of these brethren is much celebrated, which they underwent for the king's daughter, who was found slain; and the enemies of the Jews said that the Jews had slain her; and these brethren, to deliver Israel, said, 'We slew her'; therefore those alone the king slew. So the Gloss...