Jeremiah 36:22

22 Since it was the ninth month, the king was sitting in his winter quarters[a] with a fire burning in front of him.

Jeremiah 36:22 Meaning and Commentary

Jeremiah 36:22

Now the king sat in the winter house, in the ninth month
The month Cisleu, which answers to part of November, and part of December; and so was the midst of winter, and a proper time for the king to be in his winter house; though, as this was a fast day, it would have been more proper for him to have been at the worship of God in the temple, ( Jeremiah 36:9 ) . This winter house probably was a winter parlour, as distinguished from a summer parlour, ( Judges 3:20 ) ; and both might be under the same roof, or parts of the same house; only the one might be more airy and cool, and the other more close and warm. Kings had their summer and winter houses; see ( Amos 3:15 ) ; this circumstance is mentioned for the sake of what follows, the burning of the roll; and accounts for there being a fire at hand to do it: and [there was a fire] on the hearth burning before him;
there was a stove, or some such vessel or instrument, in which a large fire of wood was made, at which the king sat to keep himself warm while the roll was reading, and about which the princes stood.

Jeremiah 36:22 In-Context

20 Then they came to the king at the courtyard, having deposited the scroll in the chamber of Elishama the scribe, and reported everything in the hearing of the king.
21 The king sent Jehudi to get the scroll, and he took it from the chamber of Elishama the scribe. Jehudi then read it in the hearing of the king and all the officials who were standing by the king.
22 Since it was the ninth month, the king was sitting in his winter quarters with a fire burning in front of him.
23 As soon as Jehudi would read three or four columns, Jehoiakim would cut the scroll with a scribe's knife and throw the columns into the blazing fire until the entire scroll was consumed by the fire in the brazier.
24 As they heard all these words, the king and all of his servants did not become terrified or tear their garments.

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