Compare Translations for 2 Samuel 12:15

2 Samuel 12:15 ASV
And Nathan departed unto his house. And Jehovah struck the child that Uriah's wife bare unto David, and it was very sick.
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2 Samuel 12:15 BBE
Then Nathan went back to his house. And the hand of the Lord was on David's son, the child of Uriah's wife, and it became very ill.
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2 Samuel 12:15 CEB
Then Nathan went home. The LORD struck the child that Uriah's wife had borne for David, and he became very sick.
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2 Samuel 12:15 CJB
Then Natan returned to his house. ADONAI struck the child that Uriyah's wife had borne to David, and it became very ill.
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2 Samuel 12:15 RHE
And Nathan returned to his house. The Lord also struck the child which the wife of Urias had borne to David, and his life was despaired of.
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2 Samuel 12:15 ESV
Then Nathan went to his house. And the LORD afflicted the child that Uriah's wife bore to David, and he became sick.
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2 Samuel 12:15 GW
Then Nathan went home. The LORD struck the child that Uriah's wife had given birth to for David so that the child became sick.
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2 Samuel 12:15 GNT
Then Nathan went home. The Lord caused the child that Uriah's wife had borne to David to become very sick.
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2 Samuel 12:15 HNV
Natan departed to his house. The LORD struck the child that Uriyah's wife bore to David, and it was very sick.
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2 Samuel 12:15 CSB
Then Nathan went home. The Lord struck the baby that Uriah's wife had borne to David, and he became ill.
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2 Samuel 12:15 KJV
And Nathan departed unto his house. And the LORD struck the child that Uriah's wife bare unto David, and it was very sick .
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2 Samuel 12:15 LEB
Then Nathan went to his house, and Yahweh struck the child that the wife of Uriah bore for David, and he became ill.
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2 Samuel 12:15 NCV
Then Nathan went home. And the Lord caused the son of David and Bathsheba, Uriah's widow, to be very sick.
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2 Samuel 12:15 NIRV
Nathan went home. Then the LORD made the child that had been born to Uriah's wife by David very sick.
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2 Samuel 12:15 NIV
After Nathan had gone home, the LORD struck the child that Uriah's wife had borne to David, and he became ill.
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2 Samuel 12:15 NKJV
Then Nathan departed to his house.And the Lord struck the child that Uriah's wife bore to David, and it became ill.
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2 Samuel 12:15 NLT
After Nathan returned to his home, the LORD made Bathsheba's baby deathly ill.
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2 Samuel 12:15 NRS
Then Nathan went to his house. The Lord struck the child that Uriah's wife bore to David, and it became very ill.
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2 Samuel 12:15 RSV
Then Nathan went to his house. And the LORD struck the child that Uri'ah's wife bore to David, and it became sick.
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2 Samuel 12:15 DBY
And Nathan departed to his house. And Jehovah smote the child that Urijah's wife bore to David, and it became very sick.
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2 Samuel 12:15 MSG
After Nathan went home, God afflicted the child that Uriah's wife bore to David, and he came down sick.
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2 Samuel 12:15 WBT
And Nathan departed to his house. And the LORD struck the child that Uriah's wife bore to David, and it was very sick.
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2 Samuel 12:15 TMB
And Nathan departed unto his house. And the LORD struck the child that Uriah's wife bore unto David, and it was very sick.
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2 Samuel 12:15 TNIV
After Nathan had gone home, the LORD struck the child that Uriah's wife had borne to David, and he became ill.
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2 Samuel 12:15 WEB
Nathan departed to his house. Yahweh struck the child that Uriah's wife bore to David, and it was very sick.
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2 Samuel 12:15 WYC
And Nathan turned again into his house. And the Lord smote the little child, whom the wife of Uriah childed to David, and he despaired. (And Nathan returned to his house. And the Lord struck the young child, whom Uriah's wife had borne to David, and he became very ill.)
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2 Samuel 12:15 YLT
And Nathan goeth unto his house, and Jehovah smiteth the lad, whom the wife of Uriah hath born to David, and it is incurable;
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2 Samuel 12 Commentary - Matthew Henry Commentary on the Whole Bible (Concise)

Chapter 12

Nathan's parable-David confesses his sin. (1-14) The birth of Solomon. (15-25) David's severity to the Ammonites. (26-31)

Verses 1-14 God will not suffer his people to lie still in sin. By this parable Nathan drew from David a sentence against himself. Great need there is of prudence in giving reproofs. In his application, he was faithful. He says in plain terms, Thou art the man. God shows how much he hates sin, even in his own people; and wherever he finds it, he will not let it go unpunished. David says not a word to excuse himself or make light of his sin, but freely owns it. When David said, I have sinned, and Nathan perceived that he was a true penitent, he assured him his sin was forgiven. Thou shalt not die: that is, not die eternally, nor be for ever put away from God, as thou wouldest have been, if thou hadst not put away the sin. Though thou shalt all thy days be chastened of the Lord, yet thou shalt not be condemned with the world. There is this great evil in the sins of those who profess religion and relation to God, that they furnish the enemies of God and religion with matter for reproach and blasphemy. And it appears from David's case, that even where pardon is obtained, the Lord will visit the transgression of his people with the rod, and their iniquity with stripes. For one momentary gratification of a vile lust, David had to endure many days and years of extreme distress.

Verses 15-25 David now penned the 51st Psalm, in which, though he had been assured that his sin was pardoned, he prays earnestly for pardon, and greatly laments his sin. He was willing to bear the shame of it, to have it ever before him, to be continually upbraided with it. God gives us leave to be earnest with him in prayer for particular blessings, from trust in his power and general mercy, though we have no particular promise to build upon. David patiently submitted to the will of God in the death of one child, and God made up the loss to his advantage, in the birth of another. The way to have creature comforts continued or restored, or the loss made up some other way, is cheerfully to resign them to God. God, by his grace, particularly owned and favoured that son, and ordered him to be called Jedidiah, Beloved of the Lord. Our prayers for our children are graciously and as fully answered when some of them die in their infancy, for they are well taken care of, and when others live, "beloved of the Lord."

Verses 26-31 To be thus severe in putting the children of Ammon to slavery was a sign that David's heart was not yet made soft by repentance, at the time when this took place. We shall be most compassionate, kind, and forgiving to others, when we most feel our need of the Lord's forgiving love, and taste the sweetness of it in our own souls.

2 Samuel 12 Commentary - Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

CHAPTER 12

2 Samuel 12:1-6 . NATHAN'S PARABLE.

1. the Lord sent Nathan unto David--The use of parables is a favorite style of speaking among Oriental people, especially in the conveyance of unwelcome truth. This exquisitely pathetic parable was founded on a common custom of pastoral people who have pet lambs, which they bring up with their children, and which they address in terms of endearment. The atrocity of the real, however, far exceeded that of the fictitious offense.

5. the man that hath done this thing shall surely die--This punishment was more severe than the case deserved, or than was warranted by the divine statute ( Exodus 22:1 ). The sympathies of the king had been deeply enlisted, his indignation aroused, but his conscience was still asleep; and at the time when he was most fatally indulgent to his own sins, he was most ready to condemn the delinquencies and errors of others.

2 Samuel 12:7-23 . HE APPLIES IT TO DAVID, WHO CONFESSES HIS SIN, AND IS PARDONED.

7. Nathan said to David, Thou art the man--These awful words pierced his heart, aroused his conscience, and brought him to his knees. The sincerity and depth of his penitent sorrow are evinced by the Psalms he composed ( Psalms 32:1-11 , 51:1-19 , 103:1-22 ). He was pardoned, so far as related to the restoration of the divine favor. But as from his high character for piety, and his eminent rank in society, his deplorable fall was calculated to do great injury to the cause of religion, it was necessary that God should testify His abhorrence of sin by leaving even His own servant to reap the bitter temporal fruits. David was not himself doomed, according to his own view of what justice demanded ( 2 Samuel 12:5 ); but he had to suffer a quadruple expiation in the successive deaths of four sons, besides a lengthened train of other evils.

8. I gave thee thy master's house, and thy master's wives--The phraseology means nothing more than that God in His providence had given David, as king of Israel, everything that was Saul's. The history furnishes conclusive evidence that he never actually married any of the wives of Saul. But the harem of the preceding king belongs, according to Oriental notions, as a part of the regalia to his successor.

11. I will raise up evil against thee out of thine own house, &c.--The prophet speaks of God threatening to do what He only permitted to be done. The fact is, that David's loss of character by the discovery of his crimes, tended, in the natural course of things, to diminish the respect of his family, to weaken the authority of his government, and to encourage the prevalence of many disorders throughout his kingdom.

15-23. the Lord struck the child . . . and it was very sick--The first visible chastisement inflicted on David appeared on the person of that child which was the evidence and monument of his guilt. His domestics were surprised at his conduct, and in explanation of its singularity, it is necessary to remark that the custom in the East is to leave the nearest relative of a deceased person to the full and undisturbed indulgence of his grief, till on the third or fourth day at farthest ( John 11:17 ). Then the other relatives and friends visit him, invite him to eat, lead him to a bath, and bring him a change of dress, which is necessary from his having sat or lain on the ground. The surprise of David's servants, then, who had seen his bitter anguish while the child was sick, arose apparently from this, that when he found it was dead, he who had so deeply lamented arose of himself from the earth, without waiting for their coming to him, immediately bathed and anointed himself, instead of appearing as a mourner, and after worshiping God with solemnity, returned to his wonted repast, without any interposition of others.

2 Samuel 12:24 2 Samuel 12:25 . SOLOMON IS BORN.

24, 25. Bath-sheba . . . bare a son, and he called his name Solomon--that is, "peaceable." But Nathan gave him the name of Jedediah, by command of God, or perhaps only as an expression of God's love. This love and the noble gifts with which he was endowed, considering the criminality of the marriage from which he sprang, is a remarkable instance of divine goodness and grace.

2 Samuel 12:26-31 . RABBAH IS TAKEN.

26. Joab fought against Rabbah--The time during which this siege lasted, since the intercourse with Bath-sheba, and the birth of at least one child, if not two, occurred during the progress of it, probably extended over two years.

27. the city of waters--Rabbah, like Aroer, was divided into two parts--one the lower town, insulated by the winding course of the Jabbok, which flowed almost round it, and the upper and stronger town, called the royal city. "The first was taken by Joab, but the honor of capturing so strongly a fortified place as the other was an honor reserved for the king himself."

28. encamp against the city, and take it--It has always been characteristic of Oriental despots to monopolize military honors; and as the ancient world knew nothing of the modern refinement of kings gaining victories by their generals, so Joab sent for David to command the final assault in person. A large force was levied for the purpose. David without much difficulty captured the royal city and obtained possession of its immense wealth.
lest I take the city, and it be called after my name--The circumstance of a city receiving a new name after some great person, as Alexandria, Constantinople, Hyderabad, is of frequent occurrence in the ancient and modern history of the East.

30. he took their king's crown from off his head--While the treasures of the city were given as plunder to his soldiers, David reserved to himself the crown, which was of rarest value. Its great weight makes it probable that it was like many ancient crowns, not worn, but suspended over the head, or fixed on a canopy on the top of the throne.
the precious stones--Hebrew, "stone"; was a round ball composed of pearls and other jewels, which was in the crown, and probably taken out of it to be inserted in David's own crown.

31. he brought forth the people . . . and put them under saws, &c.--This excessive severity and employment of tortures, which the Hebrews on no other occasion are recorded to have practised, was an act of retributive justice on a people who were infamous for their cruelties ( 1 Samuel 11:2 , Amos 1:13 ).