IX. Bildad’s Third Speech and Job’s Response (Job 25:1–31:40)

25:1–27:23 Job 25 is the shortest chapter of the book. (I think Bildad ran out of arguments and just punted.)

Then, Job was reminded of the respect he had earned for his godly reputation (29:7-11). When he went out to the city gate and took his seat in the town square, young and old took notice (29:7-9). Young men stepped aside when Mr. Job showed up. The older men said, “Quiet! Job has something to say.” City officials and noblemen blessed Job and spoke well of him (29:9-11). Job didn’t demand this respect by puffing out his chest; he earned it by his conduct and character. He influenced his neighborhood for the better. When a kingdom man shows up, a higher standard enters the scene.

Next, we catch a glimpse of specific actions that earned Job such high praise: he was well-known for practicing mercy and justice (29:12-17). Job was a successful businessman who was also compassionate. There was no category of people in need that he neglected. He cared for the poor . . . the fatherless . . . the dying . . . the widow . . . the blind . . . the lame . . . the needy, and the stranger (29:12-13, 15-16). When the unjust attempted to sink fangs into the innocent, Job busted their chops (29:17). A kingdom man hurts with people who hurt and helps those who need help. He is an advocate for the weak because his God is the same (see Ps 68:5).

Finally, Job blessed those around him with his wisdom (29:21-25). It’s clear from Chapter 28 that Job understood wisdom—what it is, where it comes from, and how you get it. When he opened his mouth, men listened to [him] with expectation (29:21). Just as the dew and rain bring refreshment and life, so Job’s advice and counsel gave people hope and turned their lives around (29:22-23). Wisdom is the ability to apply God’s truth to the practical issues of day-to-day life. The only way to do that is to regularly spend time with God and know his mind on matters. Many today are drinking from the wrong fountain. The counsel of a kingdom man is like fresh water to the thirsty.

But now, Job said sadly, they mock me (30:1). Those who’d formerly respected and listened to him made fun of him because of the calamities that had come upon him. This group included not only his friends but the rabble of society (30:1-15). In the past, Job himself grieved for the needy (30:25). But, in his time of distress, no one came to his aid (20:26).

In 31:1-34, Job presented a long list of sins that he denied committing. In the integrity of his heart, Job declared himself innocent of these vices. Importantly, Job still wasn’t claiming perfection. He knew he was a sinner. But, he also knew his suffering hadn’t come upon him because of his wickedness. Chapter 31, in fact, is Job’s evidence that supports the truth of God’s testimony: “No one else on earth is like him, a man of perfect integrity, who fears God and turns away from evil” (1:8).

Job’s righteousness wasn’t merely concerned with externals. He knew that righteousness begins in the heart and mind. Therefore, he had made a covenant with [his] eyes, so that he might not look at a young woman (31:1). Similarly, if you want to be a godly man, few things are more impor-tant—especially in today’s culture—than guarding your eyes. Pornography exists in many forms and is easily accessible. That’s why you have to be prepared for battle. Job didn’t have to face the temptation of pornography. But, he certainly knew what lust was and was confronted with that temptation. So, he made a covenant, a sacred agreement with his eyes, to honor God and the women around him.

Job continued to list the sins that he had avoided: lying, adultery, mistreatment of his servants, oppressing the poor and needy, greed, gloating over an enemy’s misfortune, and hiding his sins (31:2-34). And, because Job had not committed them, he entered one final plea of innocence. If he was guilty of wickedness, he summoned God to indict him (31:35-40). Then, Job rested his case.

California - Do Not Sell My Personal Information  California - CCPA Notice